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I have a bug that would lead to wrong view results when mutating keys after emitting them in view functions. The bug disappears when doing a key.slice() on emitting, however the view function becomes very slow this way. I'd like to avoid doing any unnecessary cloning in there. Do you have any insight in whether it's possible to mutate keys after emitting them? (The mutations only affect local state, not the documents).

Edit: Better code sample. The following leads to unexpected results (although I haven't yet found any consistency in them, it might just do some random memory corruption).

 'map' : "function(doc) {
    key = [doc.foo];
    emit(key, null);
    key[0] = doc.bar;
    emit(key, null);
 }

While this works (doing a clone on emitting the key):

 'map' : "function(doc) {
    key = [doc.foo];
    emit(key.slice(), null);
    key[0] = doc.bar;
    emit(key.slice(), null);
 }

I can't find any documentation on what emit is actually doing - is it storing only a reference to an object in memory or is it cloning or serializing the objects passed to it? The former would somewhat explain the behavior I've noticed while the latter means I'm doing unnecessary cloning now and there is something else wrong with my code. So my question is: Do you know how emit is implemented and how it affects this code?

  • 1
    Not sure what you are asking. Are you saying you create a view and in the map function you have something like emit(doc.id.slice(x), doc.something); and this is not working? A slightly extended code example would be helpful. – Hans May 14 '14 at 9:54
  • I just extended my question, thanks for your message. The version with slice() is working but I'd like to avoid it and I'd like some clarification on what emit does. – Michel Müller May 14 '14 at 12:01
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What emit does

Emit returns a keyed set of data (in your case null.) as well as the details of the document this data was taken from.

Imagine you have documents that show weather data from a set of locations at a set of times, then you might want to return keys in this format:

emit([ location, measure, year, month, day, hour ], relevant_data)

You can set the relevant_data to null and use the include_docs=true option in your query to get the document as part of the response. This is bad practice though and may cause a race condition where the document was updated since you retrieved the view.

The alternative is that you return actually relevant data. So if you have multiple weather observations at a location you might want to emit them for each observation.

Where you are wrong

If your map function causes an exception, nothing is returned. I believe the slice function requires a parameter for which element you are meant to return. This would hit an exception and not return any data.

If you want to return a key per element in the array, you'd have to iterate over the length of the elements in the key and have an emit per element.

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