19

I'm fairly new to the using ViewModels and I wonder, is it acceptable for a ViewModel to contain instances of domain models as properties, or should the properties of those domain models be properties of the ViewModel itself? For example, if I have a class Album.cs

public class Album
{
    public int AlbumId { get; set; }
    public string Title { get; set; }
    public string Price { get; set; }
    public virtual Genre Genre { get; set; }
    public virtual Artist Artist { get; set; }
}

Would you typically have the ViewModel hold an instance of the Album.cs class, or would you have the ViewModel have properties for each of the Album.cs class' properties.

public class AlbumViewModel
{
    public Album Album { get; set; }
    public IEnumerable<SelectListItem> Genres { get; set; }
    public IEnumerable<SelectListItem> Artists { get; set; }
    public int Rating { get; set; }
    // other properties specific to the View
}


public class AlbumViewModel
{
    public int AlbumId { get; set; }
    public string Title { get; set; }
    public string Price { get; set; }
    public IEnumerable<SelectListItem> Genres { get; set; }
    public IEnumerable<SelectListItem> Artists { get; set; }
    public int Rating { get; set; }
    // other properties specific to the View
}
  • It might be dangerous to give full access to model object like in your first approach. The better option would be having your model in private field and expose only properties that are needed for view. e.g. public string Title { get { return this.album.Title; } set{ this.album.Title = value;} } – Vladimir Sachek May 14 '14 at 8:05
27

The fun part: this is not limited to viewmodels in MVC, it's actually a matter of seperation of the "good old data/business/ui layers" i.e. separation of concerns. I'll illustrate this later, but for now; keep in mind it applies to MVVM or any other design pattern as well.

Is it acceptable for a ViewModel to contain instances of domain models?

Basically not, although I see it happen a lot. It depends a bit on the quick-win level of your project.

Let me give an example. Imagine the following view model:

public class FooViewModel
{
    public string Name {get; set;} 
    public DomainClass Genre {get;set;} 
}

and the following DomainClass

//also applies to database data/POCO classes
public class DomainClass
{
    public int Id {get; set;}      
    public string Name {get;set;} 
}

So, somewhere in your controller you populate the FooViewModel and pass it on to your view.

Now, consider the following scenarios:

1) The domain model changes.

In this case you'll probably need to adjust the view as well, this is bad practice in context of separation of concerns.

If you have separated the ViewModel from the DomainModel, a minor adjustment in the mappings (ViewModel => DomainModel (and back)) would be sufficient.

2) The DomainClass has nested properties and your view just displays the GenreName.

I have seen this go wrong in real live scenarios.

In this case a common problem is that the use of @Html.EdittorFor will lead to inputs for the nested object. This might include Ids and other sensitive information. Following this course, you'll find yourself creating hidden inputs. If you combine this with a server side modelbinding or automapper it's really hard to block the manipulation of hidden Id's with tools like firebug.

Although it's possible, maybe easy, to block some of those fields, the more nested Domain/Data objects you have, the more trickier it will become to secure this part. And bear in mind, that you might want to change your DomainModel for a reason that's not necessarily targetting the view. So with every change in your DomainModel you should be aware that it might affect the view and the security aspects of the controller.

3) In asp.net-MVC it is common to use validation attributes.

Do you really want your domain to contain metadata about your views? Or apply view-logic to your data-layer? Is your view-validation always the same as the domain-validation? Does it have the same validation logic? Are you are using your domain-models cross application? etc.

I think it's clear this is not the route to take.

4) More

I can give you more scenario's but it's just a matter of taste to what's more appealing. I'll just hope at this point you'll get the point :) Nevertheless, I promised an illustration:

Scematic

Now, for really dirty and quick-wins it will work, but I don't think you should want it.

It's just a little more effort to build a view-model, which usually is for 80+% similar to the domain model. This might feel like doing unnecessary mappings, but when the first conceptual difference arises, you'll find that it was worth the effort :)

So as an alternative, I propose the following setup for a general case:

  • create a viewmodel
  • create a domainmodel
  • create a datamodel
  • use a library like automapper to create mapping from one to the other (this will help to map Foo.FooProp to OtherFoo.FooProp)

The benefits are, e.g.; if you create an extra field in one of your database tables, it won't affect your view. It might hit your business layer or mappings, but there it will stop. Of course, most of the time you want to change your view as well, but in this case you don't need to. It therefore keeps the problem isolated in one part of your code.

web api / data-layer

Yet another concrete example of how this will work in a Web-API / EF scenario:

Web Api Datalayer EF

note

As @mrjoltcola stated: there is also a an over-enginering component to keep in mind. If non of the above applies, and the users/programmers can be trusted, your good to go. But keep in mind that maintainability and re-usability will decrease due to the DomainModel/ViewModel mixing.

15

Opinions vary, from a mix of technical best practices and personal preferences.

There is nothing wrong with using domain objects in your view models, or even using domain objects as your model, and many people do. Some feel strongly about creating view models for every single view, but personally, I feel many apps are over-engineered by developers who learn and repeat one approach that they are comfortable with. The truth is there are several ways to accomplish the goal using newer versions of ASP.NET MVC.

The biggest risk, when you use a common domain class for your view model and your business and persistence layer, is that of model injection. Adding new properties to a model class can expose those properties outside the boundary of the server. An attacker can potentially see properties he should not see (serialization) and alter values he should not alter (model binders).

To guard against injection, use secure practices that are relevant to your overall approach. If you plan to use domain objects, then make sure to use white lists or black lists (inclusion / exclusion) in the controller or via model binder annotations. Black lists are more convenient, but lazy developers writing future revisions may forget about them or not be aware of them. White lists ([Bind(Include=...)] are obligatory, requiring attention when new fields are added, so they act as an inline view model.

Example:

[Bind(Exclude="CompanyId,TenantId")]
public class CustomerModel
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public int CompanyId { get; set; } // user cannot inject
    public int TenantId { get; set; }  // ..
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Phone { get; set; }
    // ...
}

or

public ActionResult Edit([Bind(Include = "Id,Name,Phone")] CustomerModel customer)
{
    // ...
}

The first sample is a good way to enforce multitenant safety across the application. The second sample allows customizing each action.

Be consistent in your approach and clearly document the approach used in your project for other developers.

I recommend you always use view models for login / profile related features to force yourself to "marshall" the fields between the web constroller and the data access layer as a security exercise.

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