57

This is Python 2.5, and it's GAE too, not that it matters.

I have the following code. I'm decorating the foo() method in bar, using the dec_check class as a decorator.

class dec_check(object):

  def __init__(self, f):
    self.func = f

  def __call__(self):
    print 'In dec_check.__init__()'
    self.func()

class bar(object):

  @dec_check
  def foo(self):
    print 'In bar.foo()'

b = bar()
b.foo()

When executing this I was hoping to see:

In dec_check.__init__()
In bar.foo()

But I'm getting "TypeError: foo() takes exactly 1 argument (0 given)" as .foo(), being an object method, takes self as an argument. I'm guessing problem is that the instance of bar doesn't actually exist when I'm executing the decorator code.

So how do I pass an instance of bar to the decorator class?

78

You need to make the decorator into a descriptor -- either by ensuring its (meta)class has a __get__ method, or, way simpler, by using a decorator function instead of a decorator class (since functions are already descriptors). E.g.:

def dec_check(f):
  def deco(self):
    print 'In deco'
    f(self)
  return deco

class bar(object):
  @dec_check
  def foo(self):
    print 'in bar.foo'

b = bar()
b.foo()

this prints

In deco
in bar.foo

as desired.

  • 2
    Change the f(self) line to return f(self) to pass the return of foo back to the caller. – j6m8 Jul 29 '17 at 15:32
  • 2
    Broken link to the descriptor page. – Apteryx Aug 11 '17 at 15:56
  • @Apteryx: I linked the Python docs on descriptors; dry, but covers them well enough. – ShadowRanger Sep 5 at 19:55
44

Alex's answer suffices when a function is sufficient. However, when you need a class you can make it work by adding the following method to the decorator class.

def __get__(self, obj, objtype):
    """Support instance methods."""
    import functools
    return functools.partial(self.__call__, obj)

To understand this you need to understand the descriptor protocol. The descriptor protocol is the mechanism for binding a thing to an instance. It consists of __ get __, __ set __ and __ delete __, which are called when the thing is got, set or deleted from the instances dictionary.

In this case when the thing is got from the instance we are binding the first argument of its __ call __ method to the instance, using partial. This is done automatically for member functions when the class is constructed, but for a synthetic member function like this we need to do it explicitly.

  • 4
    This seems to work.Would you mind explaining how this works? – Gilbert Feb 1 '11 at 20:10
  • 6
    @Gilbert The descriptor protocol is the mechanism for binding a thing to an instance. It consists of __ get __, __ set __ and __ delete __, which are called when the thing is got, set or deleted from the instances dictionary. In this case when the thing is got from the instance we are binding the first argument of it's __ call __ method to the instance, using partial. This is done automatically for member functions when the class is constructed, but for a synthetic member function like this we need to do it explicitly. – Gordon Wrigley Feb 3 '11 at 23:35
  • 4
    So what about if the decorator takes arguments? – Adam Parkin Feb 23 '12 at 0:44
  • python docs have a Descriptor HowTo Guide section – n611x007 Apr 16 '14 at 19:10
  • 1
    A better way to implement __get__ is to use types.MethodType to make an actual bound (or in some cases on Py2, unbound) method object. On Py2, you'd make the __get__ body return types.MethodType(self, instance, instancetype); on Py3, you'd first test for None on instance to avoid binding (if instance is None: return self), and otherwise, you'd return types.MethodType(self, instance). Full example here. Put the import outside the __get__ though; import (even cached) is relatively expensive for simple attribute lookup. – ShadowRanger Sep 5 at 19:53
1

Decorators can be a little tricky in Python. Here's an example of one I got to work sometime back. You might be able to infer from it what you're trying to do.

Django authentication and Ajax - URLs that require login

0

If you want to write the decorator as a class you can do:

from functools import update_wrapper, partial

class MyDecorator(object):
    def __init__(self, func):
        update_wrapper(self, func)
        self.func = func

    def __get__(self, obj, objtype):
        """Support instance methods."""
        return functools.partial(self.__call__, obj)

    def __call__(self, obj, *args, **kwargs):
        print('Logic here')
        return self.func(obj, *args, **kwargs)

my_decorator = MyDecorator

class MyClass(object):
     @my_decorator
     def my_method(self):
         pass

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