113

I am using Microsoft Asp.net WebApi2 hosted on IIS. I very simply would like to log the request body (XML or JSON) and the response body for each post.

There is nothing special about this project or the controller processing the post. I am not interested in using logging frameworks like nLog, elmah, log4net, or the built-in tracing features of web API unless it is necessary to do so.

I am simply wanting to know where to put my logging code and how to get the actual JSON or XML from the incoming and outgoing request and response.

My controller post method:

public HttpResponseMessage Post([FromBody])Employee employee)
{
   if (ModelState.IsValid)
   {
      // insert employee into to the database
   }

}
5
  • Are you looking to log Request/Response for a particular action, a set, or all of your actions in a particular controller?
    – LB2
    May 14, 2014 at 16:50
  • Only interested in logging Post. (a) Time of Post (b) body of xml or json posted (c) response (the xml or json content) along with the Http Status Code May 14, 2014 at 16:59
  • The reason I was asking is to suggest if to put code directly into action, or generic solution to all actions. See my answer below.
    – LB2
    May 14, 2014 at 17:04
  • FYI I removed asp.net as it has not bearing on this question
    – Dalorzo
    May 14, 2014 at 17:25
  • is creating a filer not an option?
    – Prerak K
    May 14, 2014 at 17:29

6 Answers 6

210

I would recommend using a DelegatingHandler. Then you will not need to worry about any logging code in your controllers.

public class LogRequestAndResponseHandler : DelegatingHandler
{
    protected override async Task<HttpResponseMessage> SendAsync(
        HttpRequestMessage request, CancellationToken cancellationToken)
    {
        if (request.Content != null)
        {
            // log request body
            string requestBody = await request.Content.ReadAsStringAsync();
            Trace.WriteLine(requestBody);
        }
        // let other handlers process the request
        var result = await base.SendAsync(request, cancellationToken);

        if (result.Content != null)
        {
            // once response body is ready, log it
            var responseBody = await result.Content.ReadAsStringAsync();
            Trace.WriteLine(responseBody);
        }

        return result;
    }
}

Just replace Trace.WriteLine with your logging code and register the handler in WebApiConfig like this:

config.MessageHandlers.Add(new LogRequestAndResponseHandler());

Here is the full Microsoft documentation for Message Handlers.

14
  • 4
    task.Result.Content returns System.Net.Http.ObjectContent. Is there a way to obtain the raw xml/json instead?
    – PC.
    Mar 30, 2015 at 7:25
  • 5
    @SoftwareFactor: ContinueWith and Result are dangerous APIs. It would be far better to use await instead, i.e., var result = await base.SendAsync(request, cancellationToken); var resposeBody = await response.Content.ReadAsStringAsync(); Trace.WriteLine(responseBody); return response; Nov 13, 2015 at 1:05
  • 9
    This is a very cool solution, however it will throw an error when the response contains no body. But thats easy enough to check and fix :) Dec 17, 2015 at 11:00
  • 7
    Does the call to await request.Content.ReadAsStringAsync(); not result in an error saying that the request stream has already been read in certain cirumstances?
    – Gavin
    Dec 7, 2016 at 16:21
  • 6
    If delegating handler reads the body of the request, would it not make it unavailable to the actual terminal handler (i.e. mvc/webapi)?
    – LB2
    Feb 21, 2017 at 17:05
17

There are multiple approaches to generically handle Request/Response logging for every WebAPI method calls:

  1. ActionFilterAttribute: One can write custom ActionFilterAttribute and decorate the controller/action methods to enable logging.

    Con: You need to decorate every controller/methods (still you can do it on base controller, but still it doesn't address cross cutting concerns.

  2. Override BaseController and handle logging there.

    Con: We are expecting/forcing the controllers to inherit from a custom base controller.

  3. Using DelegatingHandler.

    Advantage: We are not touching controller/method here with this approach. Delegating handler sits in isolation and gracefully handles the request/response logging.

For more indepth article, refer this http://weblogs.asp.net/fredriknormen/log-message-request-and-response-in-asp-net-webapi.

3
  • You are able to assign any actionfilter as follows: public static class WebApiConfig { public static void Register(HttpConfiguration config) { // Web API configuration and services config.Filters.Add( new MyFilter() ) // Web API routes config.MapHttpAttributeRoutes(); config.Routes.MapHttpRoute( name: "DefaultApi", routeTemplate: "api/{controller}/{id}", defaults: new { id = RouteParameter.Optional } ); } } Aug 22, 2018 at 7:14
  • You can add the action filter to all methods in your API with something like this in your global.asax: GlobalConfiguration.Configure(config => { config.Filters.Add(new LoggingAttribute())}; // log all actions Jan 13, 2021 at 11:44
  • If you want to log the most information about the action being invoked, I found the actionFilterAttribute provided the most information via the action properties on the actionContext parameter to the overridden method. Jan 13, 2021 at 11:45
15

One of the option you have is using creating a action filter and decorating your WebApiController/ApiMethod with it.

Filter Attribute

public class MyFilterAttribute : System.Web.Http.Filters.ActionFilterAttribute
    {
        public override void OnActionExecuting(HttpActionContext actionContext)
        {
            if (actionContext.Request.Method == HttpMethod.Post)
            {
                var postData = actionContext.ActionArguments;
                //do logging here
            }
        }
    }

WebApi controller

[MyFilterAttribute]
public class ValuesController : ApiController{..}

or

[MyFilterAttribute]
public void Post([FromBody]string value){..}

Hope this helps.

7
  • I like this approach but to get the response I have to override OnActionExecuted instead. The problem is the request at that point has already been converted to my POCO instead of being the xml or json. Any thoughts? May 15, 2014 at 12:00
  • Originally i meant,log data in OnActionExecuting and then simple let the post do its work. Wht i understood from your question was that you just want to log the data for each post thats done.
    – Prerak K
    May 15, 2014 at 12:04
  • 3
    I want to log both the request and the response data each time someone posts. May 15, 2014 at 12:22
  • 2
    you can use OnActionExecuted and try "(actionExecutedContext.ActionContext.Response.Content as ObjectContent).Value.ToString()" to get the response and log it.
    – Prerak K
    May 15, 2014 at 18:50
  • 1
    I don't know about earlier versions, but WebApi 2.1 exposes the original request on actionExecutedContext.Response.RequestMessage - just cast the Content property to ObjectContent and read the Value as per Prerak's comment above. Nov 4, 2014 at 21:46
4

Getting access to request message is easy. Your base class, ApiController contains .Request property, which, as name suggests, contains the request in parsed form. You simply examine it for whatever you're looking to log and pass it to your logging facility, whichever it may be. This code you can put in the beginning of your action, if you need to do it for just one or a handful.

If you need to do it on all actions (all meaning more than a manageable handful), then what you can do is override .ExecuteAsync method to capture every action call for your controller.

public override Task<HttpResponseMessage> ExecuteAsync(
    HttpControllerContext controllerContext,
    CancellationToken cancellationToken
)
{
    // Do logging here using controllerContext.Request
    return base.ExecuteAsync(controllerContext, cancellationToken);
}
4
  • I am doing this, and I haven´t benchmarked it yet, just my intuition tells me that this can be very slow?
    – Marcus
    Feb 21, 2017 at 12:31
  • Why do you think it would be slow? ExecuteAsync is what gets called by framework, and the base controller class' implementation is what actually gets the action executed. This is just calling into your logging as part of already happening execution. They only penalty here is the time to do the actual logging.
    – LB2
    Feb 21, 2017 at 17:06
  • No, I mean, 'very slow' as in logging every request.
    – Marcus
    Feb 21, 2017 at 18:01
  • 2
    Well, that's a question of requirements, and that's the requirement stated by OP. It's a question of volume the site handles, the performance of logging facility, etc. That's beyond OPs post.
    – LB2
    Feb 22, 2017 at 0:05
0

This seems to be a pretty old thread but worh sharing another solution.

You can add this method in your global.asax file which will be triggered every after HTTP request ends.

void Application_EndRequest(Object Sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        var request = (Sender as HttpApplication).Request;
        var response = (Sender as HttpApplication).Response;

        if (request.HttpMethod == "POST" || request.HttpMethod == "PUT")
        {


            byte[] bytes = request.BinaryRead(request.TotalBytes);
            string body = Encoding.UTF7.GetString(bytes);
            if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(body))
            {


                // Do your logic here (Save in DB, Log in IIS etc.)
            }
        }
    }
0

This is really old topic but I spent much time(search the internet) to do these thing so I will just post my solution here.

Concept

  1. Override ExecuteAsync of APicontroller method for tracking Inbound request,in my solution I create Base_ApiController as a parent of my project's API controllers .
  2. Use System.Web.Http.Filters.ActionFilterAttribute to track Outbound response of api controller
  3. ***(Additional)***Use System.Web.Http.Filters.ExceptionFilterAttribute to log when exception occure.

1. MyController.cs

    [APIExceptionFilter]  // use 3.
    [APIActionFilter]     // use 2.
    public class Base_APIController : ApiController
    {
        public   bool  IsLogInbound
        {
            get
            { return   ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["LogInboundRequest"] =="Y"? true:false ;     }
        }
        /// <summary>
        /// for logging exception
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="controllerContext"></param>
        /// <param name="cancellationToken"></param>
        /// <returns></returns>
        public override Task<HttpResponseMessage> ExecuteAsync(
         HttpControllerContext controllerContext,
         CancellationToken cancellationToken
         )
        {
            // Do logging here using controllerContext.Request
            // I don't know why calling the code below make content not null Kanit P.
            var content = controllerContext.Request.Content.ReadAsStringAsync().Result.ToString(); // keep request json content
             // Do your own logging!
            if (IsLogInbound)
            {
                try
                {
                    ErrLog.Insert(ErrLog.type.InboundRequest, controllerContext.Request,
                         controllerContext.Request.RequestUri.AbsoluteUri
                         , content);
                }
                catch (Exception e) { }
            }

            // will not log err when go to wrong controller's action (error here but not go to APIExceptionFilter)
            var t = base.ExecuteAsync(controllerContext, cancellationToken);
            if (!t.Result.IsSuccessStatusCode)
            { 
            }
            return t;

        }

2. APIActionFilter.cs

    public class APIActionFilter : System.Web.Http.Filters.ActionFilterAttribute
    {
        public bool LogOutboundRequest
        {
            get
            { return ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["LogInboundRequest"] == "Y" ? true : false; }
        }

        public override void OnActionExecuted(HttpActionExecutedContext actionExecutedContext)
        {
            try {

                var returndata = actionExecutedContext.Response.Content.ReadAsStringAsync().Result.ToString(); 
             //keep Json response content
             // Do your own logging!
                if (LogOutboundRequest)
                {
                    ErrLog.Insert(ErrLog.type.OutboundResponse, actionExecutedContext.Response.Headers,
                       actionExecutedContext.ActionContext.ControllerContext.ControllerDescriptor.ControllerName
                      + "/"
                      + actionExecutedContext.ActionContext.ActionDescriptor.ActionName
                      , returndata );
                }
            } catch (Exception e) {

            }
     

        } 
    }
}

3. APIExceptionFilter.cs

    public class APIExceptionFilter : ExceptionFilterAttribute
    {
    public bool IsLogErr
    {
        get
        { return ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["LogExceptionRequest"] == "Y" ? true : false; }
    }


    public override void OnException(HttpActionExecutedContext context)
    {
        try
        { 
            //Do your own logging!
            if (IsLogErr)
            {
                ErrLog.Insert(ErrLog.type.APIFilterException, context.Request,
                    context.ActionContext.ControllerContext.ControllerDescriptor.ControllerName
                    + "/"
                    + context.ActionContext.ActionDescriptor.ActionName
                    , context.Exception.ToString() + context.Exception.StackTrace);
            }
        }catch(Exception e){

        }

        if (context.Exception is NotImplementedException)
        {
            context.Response = new HttpResponseMessage(HttpStatusCode.NotImplemented);
        }
        else {
            context.Response = new HttpResponseMessage(HttpStatusCode.InternalServerError);

        }
    }
}

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