1

How does one write a function to split a list and then merge it back together such that the resulting list represents the shuffle of a deck?

The list (1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10) should end up as (1 6 2 7 3 8 4 9 5 10)

Is there a way to use split-at or reduce or some other function to achieve this?

So far I'm here:

(defn shuffle [cards] 
  (split-at (/ (count cards) 2) cards)
)
3
  • What I think you want is to zip the two lists together in this case. But if you're talking about shuffling, then shouldn't it be more random? There's no guarantee of a one-to-one zipping during card shuffling. May 15, 2014 at 1:18
  • What you describe is a perfect riffle shuffle. Perhaps you could edit the question accordingly.
    – Thumbnail
    May 15, 2014 at 9:29
  • You should probably use quot rather than / to get the integer quotient: for example, (split-at 3.5 cards) isn't entirely clear. In fact, split-at always rounds down.
    – Thumbnail
    May 15, 2014 at 11:44

4 Answers 4

6
(apply interleave (split-at 5 (range 1 11)))

(1 6 2 7 3 8 4 9 5 10)

1
  • Works perfectly. This is the cleanest answer
    – user3594595
    May 15, 2014 at 5:57
3

Clojure has an excellent selection of sequence functions.

user> (range 1 11)
(1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10)
user> (apply mapcat list (split-at 5 (range 1 11)))
(1 6 2 7 3 8 4 9 5 10)

You can get an overview at the clojure cheatsheet, it's a little out of date but mostly still relevant, and gives a good overview of the Clojure basics.

2
  • Ah mapcat, I always forget about you… (+1). May 15, 2014 at 1:40
  • Don't forget interleave!
    – grdvnl
    May 15, 2014 at 1:53
1

Split like you already have, then zip the two halves together and flatten:

(defn shuffle [cards]
  (->> cards
    (split-at (/ (count cards) 2))
    (apply map list)
    (flatten)))

(shuffle '(1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10)) ;=> (1 6 2 7 3 8 4 9 5 10)

Of course if you want a “truly” random shuffle, use clojure.core/shuffle.

2
  • 1
    flatten is almost always the wrong thing, if the input has any structure, flatten is likely to denature that structure, and to render the output irrelevant.
    – noisesmith
    May 15, 2014 at 1:40
  • @noisesmith Yea, of course here it could’ve been just apply concat, or mapcat as you have. May 15, 2014 at 1:41
0

A general solution is

(defn riffle [s]
  (let [v (vec s), c (quot (count v) 2)]
    (interleave (subvec v 0 c) (subvec v c))))

In this case

(riffle '(1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10))
; (1 6 2 7 3 8 4 9 5 10)

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