19

I have a dictionary as

Samples = {5.207403005022627: 0.69973543384229719, 6.8970222167794759: 0.080782939731898179, 7.8338517407140973: 0.10308033284258854, 8.5301143255505334: 0.018640838362318335, 10.418899728838058: 0.14427355015329846, 5.3983946820220501: 0.51319796560976771}

I want to separate the keys and values into 2 numpy arrays. I tried np.array(Samples.keys(),dtype=np.float) but i get an error TypeError: float() argument must be a string or a number

31

You can use np.fromiter to directly create numpy arrays from the dictionary key and values views:

In python 3:

keys = np.fromiter(Samples.keys(), dtype=float)
vals = np.fromiter(Samples.values(), dtype=float)

In python 2:

keys = np.fromiter(Samples.iterkeys(), dtype=float)
vals = np.fromiter(Samples.itervalues(), dtype=float)
14

On python 3.4, the following simply works:

Samples = {5.207403005022627: 0.69973543384229719, 6.8970222167794759: 0.080782939731898179, 7.8338517407140973: 0.10308033284258854, 8.5301143255505334: 0.018640838362318335, 10.418899728838058: 0.14427355015329846, 5.3983946820220501: 0.51319796560976771}

keys = np.array(list(Samples.keys()))
values = np.array(list(Samples.values()))

The reason np.array(Samples.values()) doesn't give what you expect in Python 3 is that in Python 3, the values() method of a dict returns an iterable view, whereas in Python 2, it returns an actual list of the keys.

keys = np.array(list(Samples.keys())) will actually work in Python 2.7 as well, and will make your code more version agnostic. But the extra call to list() will slow it down marginally.

  • list() may not be the good option as it may suffle the values as the index of data is quite important. – Shekhar Koirala Oct 3 '18 at 12:05
2

Just assign all of the values to a list, and then convert to a np.array().

import numpy as np

Samples = {5.207403005022627: 0.69973543384229719, 6.8970222167794759: 0.080782939731898179, 7.8338517407140973: 0.10308033284258854, 8.5301143255505334: 0.018640838362318335, 10.418899728838058: 0.14427355015329846, 5.3983946820220501: 0.51319796560976771}

keys = np.array(Samples.keys())
vals = np.array(Samples.values())

Or, if you want to iterate over it:

import numpy as np

Samples = {5.207403005022627: 0.69973543384229719, 6.8970222167794759: 0.080782939731898179, 7.8338517407140973: 0.10308033284258854, 8.5301143255505334: 0.018640838362318335, 10.418899728838058: 0.14427355015329846, 5.3983946820220501: 0.51319796560976771}

keys = vals = []

for k, v in Samples.items():
    keys.append(k)
    vals.append(v)

keys = np.array(keys)
vals = np.array(vals)
  • Could u iterate over this array? – VeilEclipse May 15 '14 at 3:06
  • Do you want to iterate over it? If so, then yes. – A.J. Uppal May 15 '14 at 3:08
  • When u do keys = np.array(Samples.keys()), could u iterate? – VeilEclipse May 15 '14 at 3:12
2

In Python 3.7:

import numpy as np

Samples = {5.207403005022627: 0.69973543384229719, 6.8970222167794759: 0.080782939731898179, 7.8338517407140973: 0.10308033284258854, 8.5301143255505334: 0.018640838362318335, 10.418899728838058: 0.14427355015329846, 5.3983946820220501: 0.51319796560976771}

keys = np.array(list(Samples.keys()))
vals = np.array(list(Samples.values()))

Note: It's important to say that in this Python version dict.keys() and dict.values() return objects of type dict_keys and dict_values, respectively.

0
keys = np.array(dictionary.keys())
values = np.array(dictionary.values())
  • 4
    No it won't work (at least in python 3.4): >> np.array(Samples.keys()) Out[15]: array(dict_keys([5.207403005022627, 6.897022216779476, 7.833851740714097, 8.530114325550533, 10.418899728838058, 5.39839468202205]), dtype=object) Which is not what you want! – ankostis Jul 22 '14 at 10:43

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