8

I'm getting weird results from trying to use qsort on this array of structs.

I have this struct:

struct access_data{
    int sector;
    int arrival_time;
    int checked;
    int processed;
};

I construct an array of access_data pointers from a file such that they are sorted by arrival_time, but I need to sort them by sector later, so I have the following:

int compare_data(const void* a, const void* b){
    if (((access_data*)a)->sector < ((access_data*)b)->sector)
        return 1;
    else if (((access_data*)a)->sector > ((access_data*)b)->sector)
        return -1;
    else
        return 0;
}

void scan(access_data* data[], int len, int sec_to_sec_seek){
    qsort(data, len, sizeof(access_data*), &compare_data);

    show_data(data, len);
}

show_data simply prints the data, but I get the following on a sample input; again, sorted already by arrival time:

data[0]: arrival_time: 7, sector: 3
data[1]: arrival_time: 6, sector: 8
data[2]: arrival_time: 5, sector: 6
data[3]: arrival_time: 4, sector: 5
data[4]: arrival_time: 3, sector: 12
data[5]: arrival_time: 2, sector: 10
data[6]: arrival_time: 1, sector: 1
data[7]: arrival_time: 0, sector: 2

It is simply not sorting by sector, but by reverse arrival time. I'm really at a complete loss at to what could be causing this behavior.

17

Your code suggests that you are actually trying sort an array of pointers to struct.

In this case you are missing a level of indirection. You also have your directions reversed.

Your compare_data routine would be fine for reverse sorting an array of structs, but you wish to sort an array of pointers based on what they point to.

int compare_pointed_to_data(const void* a, const void* b) {
    // a is a pointer into the array of pointers
    struct access_data *ptr_to_left_struct = *(access_data**)a;
    struct access_data *ptr_to_right_struct = *(access_data**)b;

    if ( ptr_to_left_struct->sector < ptr_to_right_struct->sector)
        return -1;
    else if (ptr_to_left_struct->sector > ptr_to_right_struct->sector)
        return 1;
    else
        return 0;
}
  • Thank you so much. This fixed my issue. :-). Ahh that was painful. – FernandoZ Feb 25 '17 at 1:45
0

The problem here is that you are telling QSort to sort an array of pointers, and as a result the parameters in the comparator are pointers to pointers.

int compare_data(const void* _a, const void* _b){
    access_data *a = *(access_data**)_a, *b = *(access_data**)_b;
    if ((a)->sector < (b)->sector)
        return 1;
    else if ((a)->sector > (b)->sector)
        return -1;
    else
        return 0;
}

void scan(access_data* data[], int len, int sec_to_sec_seek){
    qsort(data, len, sizeof(access_data*), &compare_data);

    show_data(data, len);
}

Let me know if you still have any questions

  • my bad, I forgot to add the double pointer cast – ASKASK May 15 '14 at 22:58
  • it should work fine now – ASKASK May 15 '14 at 22:59
0

Mistake 1

printf("size=%d",sizeof(access_data*));

prints 4, expected: 16. This was the biggest problem: sorting 8 times 4 bytes, not 8 times 16.

Weirdness 2

qsort() expects a pointer-to-data but scan() receives a pointer-to-pointer-to data. Recommended fix:

void scan(access_data data[], int len, int sec_to_sec_seek){
    qsort(data, len, sizeof(access_data), &compare_data);
    show_data(data, len);
}

Optimization 3

Your compare_data() is equal to

int compare_data(const void* a, const void* b){
    return ((access_data*)b)->sector - ((access_data*)a)->sector;
}

My full working program:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

struct access_data {
    int sector;
    int arrival_time;
    int checked;
    int processed;
};
typedef struct access_data access_data;
void show_data(access_data*data, int len) {
        printf("Showing size=%d",sizeof(access_data*));
        for(int i=0;i<len;i++) {printf("data[%d]: arrival_time: %d, sector: %d\n",i,data[i].arrival_time,data[i].sector);}
}

int compare_data(const void* a, const void* b){
        return ((access_data*)b)->sector - ((access_data*)a)->sector;
}
int compare_data1(const void* a, const void* b){
    if (((access_data*)a)->sector < ((access_data*)b)->sector)
        return 1;
    else if (((access_data*)a)->sector > ((access_data*)b)->sector)
        return -1;
    else
        return 0;
}

void scan(access_data data[], int len, int sec_to_sec_seek){
    qsort(data, len, sizeof(access_data), &compare_data);

    show_data(data, len);
}

int main() {
        printf("START\n");
        access_data data[8]={
                {3,4,5,6},
                {2,1,5,5},
                {1,1,3,6},
                {4,4,5,4},
                {5,4,3,4},
                {6,2,5,6},
                {7,2,5,4},
                {0,4,5,6}
        };
        scan(data,8,  0);
}
  • OP is passing an array of pointers to the function scan(). It would be incorrect to assume he can easily change parts of the code. – this May 15 '14 at 23:05
  • @self In the text he says "array of structs". That is what I wrote. We don't see his code. – MKaama May 15 '14 at 23:07
  • void scan(access_data* data[] – this May 15 '14 at 23:09

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