129

You're probably familiar with the following Ruby shorthand (a is an array):

a.map(&:method)

For example, try the following in irb:

>> a=[:a, 'a', 1, 1.0]
=> [:a, "a", 1, 1.0]
>> a.map(&:class)
=> [Symbol, String, Fixnum, Float]

The syntax a.map(&:class) is a shorthand for a.map {|x| x.class}.

Read more about this syntax in "What does map(&:name) mean in Ruby?".

Through the syntax &:class, you're making a method call class for each array element.

My question is: can you supply arguments to the method call? And if so, how?

For example, how do you convert the following syntax

a = [1,3,5,7,9]
a.map {|x| x + 2}

to the &: syntax?

I'm not suggesting that the &: syntax is better. I'm merely interested in the mechanics of using the &: syntax with arguments.

I assume you know that + is a method on Integer class. You can try the following in irb:

>> a=1
=> 1
>> a+(1)
=> 2
>> a.send(:+, 1)
=> 2
0
150

You can create a simple patch on Symbol like this:

class Symbol
  def with(*args, &block)
    ->(caller, *rest) { caller.send(self, *rest, *args, &block) }
  end
end

Which will enable you to do not only this:

a = [1,3,5,7,9]
a.map(&:+.with(2))
# => [3, 5, 7, 9, 11] 

But also a lot of other cool stuff, like passing multiple parameters:

arr = ["abc", "babc", "great", "fruit"]
arr.map(&:center.with(20, '*'))
# => ["********abc*********", "********babc********", "*******great********", "*******fruit********"]
arr.map(&:[].with(1, 3))
# => ["bc", "abc", "rea", "rui"]
arr.map(&:[].with(/a(.*)/))
# => ["abc", "abc", "at", nil] 
arr.map(&:[].with(/a(.*)/, 1))
# => ["bc", "bc", "t", nil] 

And even work with inject, which passes two arguments to the block:

%w(abecd ab cd).inject(&:gsub.with('cde'))
# => "cdeeecde" 

Or something super cool as passing [shorthand] blocks to the shorthand block:

[['0', '1'], ['2', '3']].map(&:map.with(&:to_i))
# => [[0, 1], [2, 3]]
[%w(a b), %w(c d)].map(&:inject.with(&:+))
# => ["ab", "cd"] 
[(1..5), (6..10)].map(&:map.with(&:*.with(2)))
# => [[2, 4, 6, 8, 10], [12, 14, 16, 18, 20]] 

Here is a conversation I had with @ArupRakshit explaining it further:
Can you supply arguments to the map(&:method) syntax in Ruby?


As @amcaplan suggested in the comment below, you could create a shorter syntax, if you rename the with method to call. In this case, ruby has a built in shortcut for this special method .().

So you could use the above like this:

class Symbol
  def call(*args, &block)
    ->(caller, *rest) { caller.send(self, *rest, *args, &block) }
  end
end

a = [1,3,5,7,9]
a.map(&:+.(2))
# => [3, 5, 7, 9, 11] 

[(1..5), (6..10)].map(&:map.(&:*.(2)))
# => [[2, 4, 6, 8, 10], [12, 14, 16, 18, 20]] 
23
  • 6
    Great, wish this was part of Ruby core!
    – Jikku Jose
    Jan 2 '15 at 11:05
  • 8
    @UriAgassi Just because a lot of libraries do this does not make it a good practice. While Symbol#with may not exist in the core library and defining that method is less destructive than redefining an existing method it is still changing (i.e. overwriting) the implementation of core class of the ruby library. The practice should be done very sparingly and with great caution. \n\n Please consider inheriting from the existing class and modifying the newly created class. This generally achieves comparable results without the negative side effects of changing core ruby classes.
    – rudolph9
    May 6 '15 at 13:27
  • 3
    @rudolph9 - I beg to differ - the definition of "overwrite" is to write over something, which means that a code that was written is not longer available, and this is clearly not the case. Regarding your suggestion to inherit Symbol class - it is not trivial (if even possible), since it is such a core class (it has no new method, for example), and its usage will be cumbersome (if even possible), which will defeat the purpose of the enhancement... if you can show an implementation which uses that, and achieves comparable results - please share!
    – Uri Agassi
    May 6 '15 at 13:39
  • 3
    I like this solution, but I think you can have even more fun with it. Instead of defining a with method, define call. Then you can do things like a.map(&:+.(2)) since object.() uses the #call method. And while you're at it, you can write fun things like :+.(2).(3) #=> 5 - feels sort of LISPy, no?
    – amcaplan
    Aug 13 '15 at 9:27
  • 2
    Would love to see this in core - its a common pattern that could use some sugar ala .map(&:foo)
    – Stephen
    Feb 7 '17 at 22:07
53

For your example can be done a.map(&2.method(:+)).

Arup-iMac:$ pry
[1] pry(main)> a = [1,3,5,7,9]
=> [1, 3, 5, 7, 9]
[2] pry(main)> a.map(&2.method(:+))
=> [3, 5, 7, 9, 11]
[3] pry(main)> 

Here is how it works :-

[3] pry(main)> 2.method(:+)
=> #<Method: Fixnum#+>
[4] pry(main)> 2.method(:+).to_proc
=> #<Proc:0x000001030cb990 (lambda)>
[5] pry(main)> 2.method(:+).to_proc.call(1)
=> 3

2.method(:+) gives a Method object. Then &, on 2.method(:+), actually a call #to_proc method, which is making it a Proc object. Then follow What do you call the &: operator in Ruby?.

7
  • Clever usage! Does that assume that the method invocation can be applied both ways (i.e. arr[element].method(param) === param.method(arr[element])) or am I confused? May 16 '14 at 13:21
  • @rkon I didn't get your question too. But if you see the Pry outputs above, you can get it, how is it working. May 16 '14 at 13:25
  • 6
    @rkon It doesn't work in both ways. It works in this particular case because + is commutative.
    – sawa
    May 16 '14 at 13:28
  • How can you supply multiple arguments? As in this case: a.map {|x| x.method(1,2,3)}
    – Zack Xu
    May 16 '14 at 13:28
  • 1
    that's my point @sawa :) That it makes sense with + but wouldn't for another method or let's say if you wanted to divide each number by X. May 16 '14 at 13:28
13

As the post you linked to confirms, a.map(&:class) is not a shorthand for a.map {|x| x.class} but for a.map(&:class.to_proc).

This means that to_proc is called on whatever follows the & operator.

So you could give it directly a Proc instead:

a.map(&(Proc.new {|x| x+2}))

I know that most probably this defeats the purpose of your question but I can't see any other way around it - it's not that you specify which method to be called, you just pass it something that responds to to_proc.

1
  • 1
    Also keep in mind you can set procs to local variables and pass them to map. my_proc = Proc.new{|i| i + 1}, [1,2,3,4].map(&my_proc) => [2,3,4,5]
    – rudolph9
    May 6 '15 at 12:48
11

There is another native option for enumerables which is pretty only for two arguments in my opinion. the class Enumerable has the method with_object which then returns another Enumerable.

So you can call the & operator for a method with each item and the object as arguments.

Example:

a = [1,3,5,7,9]
a.to_enum.with_object(2).map(&:+) # => [3, 5, 7, 9, 11]

In the case you want more arguments you should repeat the proccess but it's ugly in my opinion:

a = [1,3,5,7,9]
a.to_enum.with_object(2).map(&:+).to_enum.with_object(5).map(&:+) # => [8, 10, 12, 14, 16]
1
  • 2
    Three things to note with this approach: 1.) it's actually longer (in terms of characters) than just doing a.map { |n| n + 2 }, 2.) it's, arguably, less readable, and 3.) it's 5 times slower than running map() directly on the array (~19 seconds compared to ~ 3.75 seconds when benchmarked using 10_000_000.times {}. That being said, I still upvoted because it's definitely a creative solution to the question at hand. :-)
    – jeffdill2
    Nov 25 '20 at 16:26
10

Short answer: No.

Following @rkon's answer, you could also do this:

a = [1,3,5,7,9]
a.map &->(_) { _ + 2 } # => [3, 5, 7, 9, 11]
4
  • 10
    You are right, but I don't think &->(_){_ + 2} is any shorter than {|x| x + 2}.
    – sawa
    May 16 '14 at 20:46
  • 1
    It isn't, that's what @rkon says in his answer so I didn't repeat it.
    – Agis
    May 19 '14 at 10:13
  • 2
    @Agis though your answer isn't shorter, it looks better.
    – Jikku Jose
    Nov 14 '14 at 2:02
  • 1
    That is an awesome solution. Feb 9 '15 at 21:23
6

Instead of patching core classes yourself, as in the accepted answer, it's shorter and cleaner to use the functionality of the Facets gem:

require 'facets'
a = [1,3,5,7,9]
a.map &:+.(2)
2

if all your method needs as argument is an element from the array, this is probably the simplest way to do it:

def double(x)
  x * 2
end

[1, 2, 3].map(&method(:double))

=> [2, 4, 6]
1

I'm not sure about the Symbol#with already posted, I simplified it quite a bit and it works well:

class Symbol
  def with(*args, &block)
    lambda { |object| object.public_send(self, *args, &block) }
  end
end

(also uses public_send instead of send to prevent calling private methods, also caller is already used by ruby so this was confusing)

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