480

I've just started playing with Java 8 lambdas and I'm trying to implement some of the things that I'm used to in functional languages.

For example, most functional languages have some kind of find function that operates on sequences, or lists that returns the first element, for which the predicate is true. The only way I can see to achieve this in Java 8 is:

lst.stream()
    .filter(x -> x > 5)
    .findFirst()

However this seems inefficient to me, as the filter will scan the whole list, at least to my understanding (which could be wrong). Is there a better way?

  • 48
    It's not inefficient, Java 8 Stream implementation is lazy evaluated, so filter is applied only to terminal operation. Same question here: stackoverflow.com/questions/21219667/stream-and-lazy-evaluation – Marek Gregor May 16 '14 at 13:35
  • 1
    Cool. That's what I hoped it'd do. It would've been a major design flop otherwise. – siki May 16 '14 at 13:52
  • 2
    If your intention is really to check whether the list contains such an element at all (not single out the first of possibly several), .findAny() can theoretically be more efficient in a parallell setting, and of course communicates that intent more clearly. – Joachim Lous Apr 20 '16 at 9:01
  • Compared to a simple forEach cycle, this would create lots of objects on the heap and dozens of dynamic method calls. While this might not always affect the bottom line in your performance tests, in the hot spots it makes a difference to abstain from the trivial use of Stream and similar heavyweight constructs. – Agoston Horvath Sep 22 '16 at 14:07
681

No, filter does not scan the whole stream. It's an intermediate operation, which returns a lazy stream (actually all intermediate operations return a lazy stream). To convince you, you can simply do the following test:

List<Integer> list = Arrays.asList(1, 10, 3, 7, 5);
int a = list.stream()
            .peek(num -> System.out.println("will filter " + num))
            .filter(x -> x > 5)
            .findFirst()
            .get();
System.out.println(a);

Which outputs:

will filter 1
will filter 10
10

You see that only the two first elements of the stream are actually processed.

So you can go with your approach which is perfectly fine.

  • 36
    As a note, I used get(); here because I know which values I feed to the stream pipeline and hence that there will be a result. In practice, you should not use get();, but orElse() / orElseGet() / orElseThrow() (for a more meaningful error instead of a NSEE) as you might not know if the operations applied to the stream pipeline will result in an element. – Alexis C. Feb 24 '16 at 17:22
  • 30
    .findFirst().orElse(null); for example – Gondy Nov 11 '16 at 9:12
  • 19
    Don't use orElse null. That should be an anti-pattern. It is all included in the Optional so why should you risk a NPE? I think dealing with Optional is the better way. Just test the Optional with isPresent() before you use it. – BeJay Jan 4 '18 at 9:55
  • @BeJay i don't understand. what should I use instead of orElse ? – John Henckel Sep 6 at 14:45
102

However this seems inefficient to me, as the filter will scan the whole list

No it won't - it will "break" as soon as the first element satisfying the predicate is found. You can read more about laziness in the stream package javadoc, in particular (emphasis mine):

Many stream operations, such as filtering, mapping, or duplicate removal, can be implemented lazily, exposing opportunities for optimization. For example, "find the first String with three consecutive vowels" need not examine all the input strings. Stream operations are divided into intermediate (Stream-producing) operations and terminal (value- or side-effect-producing) operations. Intermediate operations are always lazy.

  • 5
    This answer was more informative to me, and explains the why, not only how. I never new intermediate operations are always lazy; Java streams continue to surprise me. – kevinarpe Jul 6 '15 at 7:45
30
return dataSource.getParkingLots().stream().filter(parkingLot -> Objects.equals(parkingLot.getId(), id)).findFirst().orElse(null);

I had to filter out only one object from a list of objects. So i used this, hope it helps.

  • BETTER: since we looking for a boolean return value, we can do it better by adding null check: return dataSource.getParkingLots().stream().filter(parkingLot -> Objects.equals(parkingLot.getId(), id)).findFirst().orElse(null) != null; – shreedhar bhat Apr 3 at 9:48
13

In addition to Alexis C's answer, If you are working with an array list, in which you are not sure whether the element you are searching for exists, use this.

Integer a = list.stream()
                .peek(num -> System.out.println("will filter " + num))
                .filter(x -> x > 5)
                .findFirst()
                .orElse(null);

Then you could simply check whether a is null.

0

If you are looking for a boolean return value, we can do it better by adding null check:

return dataSource.getParkingLots().stream().filter(parkingLot -> Objects.equals(parkingLot.getId(), id)).findFirst().orElse(null) != null;
0

import org.junit.Test;

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.Optional;

// Stream is ~30 times slower for same operation...
public class StreamPerfTest {

    int iterations = 100;
    List<Integer> list = Arrays.asList(1, 10, 3, 7, 5);


    // 55 ms
    @Test
    public void stream() {

        for (int i = 0; i < iterations; i++) {
            Optional<Integer> result = list.stream()
                    .filter(x -> x > 5)
                    .findFirst();

            System.out.println(result.orElse(null));
        }
    }

    // 2 ms
    @Test
    public void loop() {

        for (int i = 0; i < iterations; i++) {
            Integer result = null;
            for (Integer walk : list) {
                if (walk > 5) {
                    result = walk;
                    break;
                }
            }
            System.out.println(result);
        }
    }
}

-19

Unless your list is really huge (thousands of elements), using streams here is just expensive, and even makes the code harder to understand.

Note: java is NOT a functional language (and jvm isn't particularily suited for implementing functional languages efficiently).

Much simpler and more efficiant is (on all Iterable's):

for (MyType walk : lst)
    if (walk > 5) { do_whatever; break; }

Or if you wanna skip the iterator:

for (int x=0; x<list.size(); x++)
    if (list.get(x) > 5 { do_whatever; break; }

Actually, I really wonder why some many people suggest this complex and expensive streams machinery, even for trivial things like getting the first element of an array. (yes: arrays are still supported in Java8).

  • 2
    What if you have a number of intermediate operations before you apply a filter? – ZhekaKozlov Feb 13 '17 at 9:44
  • 16
    "and jvm isn't particularily suited for implementing functional languages efficiently)" :-) Have you heard about Clojure? – Lluis Martinez Mar 16 '17 at 23:47
  • 1
    On what nonsense is your answer based on? – J. Doe Nov 29 '18 at 13:32
  • I completely agree that using streams in such a simple case makes the code less readable. Streams are often slower than standard loops, never faster, and often harder to understand. – John Patterson Mar 27 at 2:17

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