17

I am using entity framework. There is one particular situation in my application where I have to use a stored procedure. Since there are a lot of SQL statements written in the SP, I don't want to re-write it in my C# code. I only need to get the result back in the form of a datatable. I have written a little bit of code but I am stuck at one point. Can someone complete the code below?

using (dbContext.Database.Connection)
{
dbContext.Database.Connection.Open();
DbCommand cmdItems= dbContext.Database.Connection.CreateCommand();
cmdItems.CommandText = "GetAvailableItems";
cmdItems.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
cmdItems.Parameters.Add(new SqlParameter("jobCardId", 100525));
//Need to write code below to populate a DataTable.
}
4
  • use mentioned link entityframeworktutorial.net/EntityFramework4.3/… May 16, 2014 at 14:16
  • I am using code first and I don't have an entity for the returned dataset. I need the result set as DataTable. That's where I have to perform operation on the dynamic data(data with different column names for the parameter passed). May 16, 2014 at 14:22
  • @user1640256 I see from the code that you are 'getting' something from the database. I infer that you are doing a SELECT query. So you know fairly well what columns you are fetching from the DB. Can you just create an entity and map the stored procedure results to the entity. That should make your work quite simple. May 16, 2014 at 14:29
  • Column names are generated dynamically for the result set. That is the logic I don't have to write in the code behind. May 16, 2014 at 14:41

6 Answers 6

22

Thanks a lot guys. I solved it. Here is the solution:

using (var context = new DataBaseContext())
{
    var dt = new DataTable();
    var conn = context.Database.Connection;
    var connectionState = conn.State;
    try
    {
        if (connectionState != ConnectionState.Open) conn.Open();
        using (var cmd = conn.CreateCommand())
        {
            cmd.CommandText = "GetAvailableItems";
            cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
            cmd.Parameters.Add(new SqlParameter("jobCardId", 100525));
            using (var reader = cmd.ExecuteReader())
            {
                dt.Load(reader);
            }
        }
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        // error handling
        throw;
    }
    finally
    {
        if (connectionState != ConnectionState.Closed) conn.Close();
    }
    return dt;
}
9
  • 8
    Here is why I downvoted this: This does not use entity in fact goes around entity using traditional sql. This fly's in the face of entity which is supposed to maintain the state between the database and local data.
    – John Smith
    Jul 8, 2015 at 18:00
  • 7
    There are use cases for it though... Think about a legacy app where the db needs to be reused, but new code is being written (what I'm doing now actually). EF can be worked into many places, making life a LOT easier, but there are some legacy sprocs that return different columns (Pivoted tables). No way that I know of to map that to a Entity when your column names are dynamic. So sure. Not "EF-friendly"... but sometimes a necessity of real life
    – BLSully
    Sep 3, 2015 at 14:17
  • 4
    Re: There are use cases for it though. Sure enough. But addressing the question which was "Returning datatable using entity framework" this is a bad answer. Also In general unless your are in a exception such as you mentioned this is not good code for people to work off of. See my answer below.
    – John Smith
    Sep 16, 2015 at 17:17
  • 3
    John, I too am a string believer in ORMs but this is absolutely not a bad answer, indeed it is better in multiple ways than yours below. There are numerous very valid reasons for getting a DataTable directly or in general circumventing the EF entity layer whilst also conveniently using EF connection configuration. Upvoted Nov 5, 2015 at 12:55
  • 1
    I was searching for the exact title of this question. I know In a some cases this answer may be a better fit, but John has a better answer for people that are trying to use Entity framework (which are the people that will most likely land here).
    – Dave Kelly
    Dec 10, 2016 at 1:26
11

This example will return a datatable object selecting data from EntityFramework.

I believe this is the best solution to the goal. However the problem with this solution is that each record is enumerated. You might want to filter the list first then run this from the list to avoid that.

DataTable dt = new DataTable();
(from rec in database.Table.AsEnumerable()
                     select new
                     {
                         id = rec.id,
                         name = rec.Name
                         //etc
                     }).Aggregate(table, (dt, r) =>
                     {
                         dt.Rows.Add(r.id, r.Name);
                         return dt;
                     });
2
  • 3
    Thanks John, I was looking for a way that actually uses Entity Framework.
    – Dave Kelly
    Dec 10, 2016 at 1:20
  • 2
    This is fine, but it doesn't at all answer this specific question. In your answer here, you have datbase.Table. You are working with an Entity in your case whereas the question is related to a datatable where the properties are unknown. With a DataTable, you can observe the returned dataset including its column count and names. And, of course, the data. If you are using E.F. and Entities, mostly LinqToSQL or LinqToEntities, amongst thousands of lines of code, but have ONE instances where you need a DataTable to observe an unknown dataset, your answer doesn't work at all.
    – Suamere
    Nov 20, 2017 at 23:19
9

This solution is simple, very fast and easy to use.

Create a DbContext extension:

using System.Data;
using System.Data.Common;
using System.Data.Entity;
..
..
public static class DbContextExtensions
{
    public static DataTable DataTable(this DbContext context, string sqlQuery)
    {
        DbProviderFactory dbFactory = DbProviderFactories.GetFactory(context.Database.Connection);

        using (var cmd = dbFactory.CreateCommand())
        {
            cmd.Connection = context.Database.Connection;
            cmd.CommandType = CommandType.Text;
            cmd.CommandText = sqlQuery;
            using (DbDataAdapter adapter = dbFactory.CreateDataAdapter())
            {
                adapter.SelectCommand = cmd;

                DataTable dt = new DataTable();
                adapter.Fill(dt);

                return dt;
            }
        }
    }
}

Examples:

using (MyDbContext db = new MyDbContext())
{
    string query = db.Students.Where(o => o.Age > 20).ToString();

    DataTable dataTable = db.DataTable(query);

    ..

    DataTable dt = db.DataTable(
                         (  from o in db.Studets
                            where o.Age > 20
                            select o
                         ).ToString()
                    );
}
1
  • 2
    This looks like it bypasses Entity Framework entirely. Jul 13, 2020 at 8:59
3

Just improving the previous solution, now including generic parameters (not SQL Server specific) and mutiple resultsets support:

    DataSet GetDataSet(string sql, CommandType commandType, Dictionary<string, Object> parameters)
    {
        // creates resulting dataset
        var result = new DataSet();

        // creates a data access context (DbContext descendant)
        using (var context = new MyDbContext())
        {
            // creates a Command 
            var cmd = context.Database.Connection.CreateCommand();
            cmd.CommandType = commandType;
            cmd.CommandText = sql;

            // adds all parameters
            foreach (var pr in parameters)
            {
                var p = cmd.CreateParameter();
                p.ParameterName = pr.Key;
                p.Value = pr.Value;
                cmd.Parameters.Add(p);
            }

            try
            {
                // executes
                context.Database.Connection.Open();
                var reader = cmd.ExecuteReader();

                // loop through all resultsets (considering that it's possible to have more than one)
                do
                {
                    // loads the DataTable (schema will be fetch automatically)
                    var tb = new DataTable();
                    tb.Load(reader);
                    result.Tables.Add(tb);

                } while (!reader.IsClosed);
            }
            finally
            {
                // closes the connection
                context.Database.Connection.Close();
            }
        }

        // returns the DataSet
        return result;
    }
1
  • 7
    You are copying and pasting this answer to multiple questions(1, 2). Please stop. Answers aren't for dumping the same block of text over and over. Instead, focus on the question and answer what is being asked. A long block of text doesn't do that.
    – Andy
    Feb 24, 2016 at 17:24
0

I added the following method into my DataContext class:

public async Task<DataTable> ExecReturnQuery(string query)
    {
        using (var command = this.Database.GetDbConnection().CreateCommand())
        {
            command.CommandText = query;

            this.Database.OpenConnection();

            using (var result = await command.ExecuteReaderAsync())
            {
                var table = new DataTable();
                table.Load(result);

                // returning DataTable (instead of DbDataReader), cause can't use DbDataReader after CloseConnection().
                this.Database.CloseConnection();

                return table;
            }
        }
    }

Then I call it from any class (where I'm injecting DataContext class) like so:

DataTable myTableRecords = await _dataContext.ExecReturnQuery("SELECT * FROM MyTable");

-2

I just mixed the answers. this code run a dynamic query and convert result to dictionary list.

public List < Dictionary < string,object >> DataTableToDictionaryList(DataTable table) {
    List < Dictionary < string,
    object >> parentRow = new List < Dictionary < string,
    object >> ();
    Dictionary < string,
    object > childRow;
    foreach(DataRow row in table.Rows) {
        childRow = new Dictionary < string,
        object > ();
        foreach(DataColumn col in table.Columns) {
            childRow.Add(col.ColumnName, row[col]);
        }
        parentRow.Add(childRow);
    }
    return (parentRow);
}

List < Dictionary < string,object >> RunDynamicQuery(string sql, Dictionary < string, Object > parameters = null, int resultSet = 0, CommandType commandType = CommandType.Text) {
    // creates resulting dataset
    var resultDataSet = new DataSet();

    // creates a data access context (DbContext descendant)
    using(var context = new DataDbContext()) {
        // creates a Command 
        var conn = context.Database.Connection;
        var cmd = conn.CreateCommand();
        cmd.CommandType = commandType;
        cmd.CommandText = sql;

        if (parameters != null) {
            // adds all parameters
            foreach(var pr in parameters) {
                var p = cmd.CreateParameter();
                p.ParameterName = pr.Key;
                p.Value = pr.Value;
                cmd.Parameters.Add(p);
            }
        }

        try {
            // executes
            if (conn.State != ConnectionState.Open) {
                conn.Open();
            }

            var reader = cmd.ExecuteReader();

            // loop through all resultsets (considering that it's possible to have more than one)
            int currentResultSet = -1;
            do {
                currentResultSet++;
                //skip lower resultsets
                if (resultSet > currentResultSet) {
                    continue;
                }

                // loads the DataTable (schema will be fetch automatically)
                var tb = new DataTable();
                tb.Load(reader);
                resultDataSet.Tables.Add(tb);
                //make sure to get only one result set
                break;
            } while (! reader . IsClosed );

        }
        finally {
            // closes the connection
            context.Database.Connection.Close();
        }
    }

    return DataTableToDictionaryList(resultDataSet.Tables[0]);
}

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