10

Can somebody explain this code ?

l3 = [ {'from': 55, 'till': 55, 'interest': 15}, ]
l4 = list( {'from': 55, 'till': 55, 'interest': 15}, )

print l3, type(l3)
print l4, type(l4)

OUTPUT:

[{'till': 55, 'from': 55, 'interest': 15}] <type 'list'>
['till', 'from', 'interest'] <type 'list'>
  • I guess list uses dict.keys() and the first one is a list of dicts. – bozdoz May 16 '14 at 19:25
  • 4
    dict is an iterable (by keys), the list() takes an iterable and returns the list. – cmd May 16 '14 at 19:26
21

When you convert a dict object to a list, it only takes the keys.

However, if you surround it with square brackets, it keeps everything the same, it just makes it a list of dicts, with only one item in it.

>>> obj = {1: 2, 3: 4, 5: 6, 7: 8}
>>> list(obj)
[1, 3, 5, 7]
>>> [obj]
[{1: 2, 3: 4, 5: 6, 7: 8}]
>>> 

This is because, when you loop over with a for loop, it only takes the keys as well:

>>> for k in obj:
...     print k
... 
1
3
5
7
>>> 

But if you want to get the keys and the values, use .items():

>>> list(obj.items())
[(1, 2), (3, 4), (5, 6), (7, 8)]
>>> 

Using a for loop:

>>> for k, v in obj.items():
...     print k, v
... 
1 2
3 4
5 6
7 8
>>> 

However, when you type in list.__doc__, it gives you the same as [].__doc__:

>>> print list.__doc__
list() -> new list
list(sequence) -> new list initialized from sequence's items
>>> 
>>> print [].__doc__
list() -> new list
list(sequence) -> new list initialized from sequence's items
>>> 

Kind of misleading :)

  • 2
    __doc__ is class(list) attribute, no wonder its instances([]) have that too. – Ashwini Chaudhary May 16 '14 at 19:42
7
  • The former just wraps the entire item in square brackets [], making it a one-item list:

    >>> [{'foo': 1, 'bar': 2}]
    [{'foo': 1, 'bar': 2}]
    
  • The latter iterates over the dictionary (getting keys) and produces a list out of them:

    >>> list({'foo': 1, 'bar': 2})
    ['foo', 'bar']
    
  • One more thing worth to be mentioned: if you want to create only one element in the list. list() might cause error such as, list(3). Only [3] can work. – Alston Feb 8 '18 at 7:05
3
>>> help(list)

Help on class list in module __builtin__:

class list(object)
 |  list() -> new empty list
 |  list(iterable) -> new list initialized from iterable's items

In the first case the notation indicates you're creating a list with a dictionary as its object. The list is created empty and the dictionary is appended as an object.

In the second case you're calling the second form of the list constructor - "initialized from iterable's items". In a dictionary it's the keys that are iterable, so you get a list of the dictionary keys.

3

The list is a constructor that will take any basic sequence (so tuples, dictionaries, other lists, etc.) and can turn them into lists. Alternatively, you could make the lists with [] and it will make a list with all the things you put inside the brackets. You can actually accomplish the same things with list comprehension.

 13 = [item for item in {'from': 55, 'till': 55, 'interest': 15}]
 14 = list({'from': 55, 'till': 55, 'interest': 15})

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