6

Almost embarrassed to ask, because I have never had a need to use tables much before...

Now I have a project that will require massive organized tables, go figure.

Suppose I have a table like this:

<table border="1px" style="width:300px">
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>First Name</th>
      <th>Last Name</th>
      <th>Age</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td>Jill</td>
      <td>Smith</td>        
      <td>50</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Eve</td>
      <td>Jackson</td>      
      <td>94</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>John</td>
      <td>Doe</td>      
      <td>80</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

First of all, from what I have read, <thead> and <tbody> seem to be optional for grouping purposes, but is this basic set up correct?

It looks fine when displayed in a browser, but I wonder if my code actually structures elements correctly in the DOM? I.E. does the DOM correctly associate the <th>First Name</th> with the <td>'s that contain the first name data? I ask because I am going to need to rely on that to sort the tables later with javascript.

I apologize if this is really simple question. If there is a reference to a "proper table structure" article, i will accept that as well.

3
  • <tfoot> tag can be included if you want the last column not be sort and having somethng. This is when using plugins like tablesorter May 16, 2014 at 19:32
  • 2
    Your structure is fine, although I believe the border attribute was deprecated a while ago and you should use CSS (ex: style="border:1px solid black") instead. I'm unsure as to what type of association you're referring to between nodes though.
    – j08691
    May 16, 2014 at 19:32
  • interesting tidbit: a table may contain only one of each thead or tfoot tags but may contain any number of tbody children. May 16, 2014 at 19:37

2 Answers 2

5

Your HTML markup is fine, except you should favor CSS classes rather than inline styles, and the border attribute is usually better as a style.

If you are ever curious if you have valid markup, you can use a validator tool to check. There is one available here, provided by W3C: http://validator.w3.org/

HTML is a presentational markup. There is no data association implicit in any given element -- that is to say, the td which you know contains the first name does not in any way associate itself with the heading which labels it visually. As far as HTML is concerned, you don't have data, just a bunch of words which it shapes and boxes and moves around on the screen.

This extends to javascript -- there is no association between the heading and table cells in DOM.

That said, sorting tables are a very common UI pattern, and you can find a large number of examples as well as existing plugins. I highly recommend that you consider an established plugin if you are going to use this for anything other than a learning experience. The plugin author has, presumably, already considered all the many ins and outs, gotchyas, and cross-browser considerations that you would have to take in to account if you tried to craft your own.

Documentation

10
  • 2
    aw... you're no fun. Using a plugin is too easy. May 16, 2014 at 19:35
  • 2
    @JosephMarikle I say this as someone who is diametrically opposed to using plugins for the sake of plugins; there is simply no reason to reinvent the wheel. Your client or employer is paying for results, not for you to demonstrate how much of a purist you can be: to that end, well-established UI enhancements on public-facing interfaces are not the place to experiment with your ability to identify and handle edge cases when that work has already been done for you, for free, and you probably have more important things to focus on. May 16, 2014 at 19:39
  • That said, I won't pretend that I have not made my own sorting table plugin. It is worth noting that it is not reliable enough for production code. May 16, 2014 at 19:41
  • 1
    of course. You're not wrong and you have an excellently formatted answer. It's just not a fun answer. It's good to use plugins and frameworks where needed. The only advantage I can point out for developing your own (even if you don't end up using it in production) is so that you can become familiar with those nuances. Then, when a plugin fails, you're capable of figuring out why and correcting it if necessary. May 16, 2014 at 19:45
  • @JosephMarikle And I think that's the best attitude to have. Before reaching for a plugin, which is a shortcut, you ought to know what you're cutting. Otherwise, that so-called shortcut could actually be the long way, and you'd never know! May 16, 2014 at 19:46
1

Best html table structure and css concept :

<table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%" class="table">
<thead>
<tr>
 <th>Header1</th>
 <th>Header2</th>
 <th>Header3</th>
</tr>
</thead>
<tfoot>
<tr>
 <th>Footer1</th>
 <th>Footer2</th>
 <th>Footer3</th>
</tr>
</tfoot>
<tbody>
<tr>
 <td>data1</td>
 <td>data2</td>
 <td>data3</td>
</tr>
<tr>
 <td>data1</td>
 <td>data2</td>
 <td>data3</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td>data1</td>
<td>data2</td>
<td>data3</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td>data1</td>
<td>data2</td>
<td>data3</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td>data1</td>
<td>data2</td>
<td>data3</td>
</tr>
</tbody>

</table>

css code and structure

<style>
html, body{font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size:12px;}
.table{border-collapse:collapse; width:100%}
.table thead th, .table tfoot th{text-align:center; background:#999; color:#FFFFFF;}
.table th, .table td{padding:5px; border:1px solid #ddd;}
.table tr:nth-child(even){background:#eee;}

</style>

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