4285

What is the most concise and efficient way to find out if a JavaScript array contains a value?

This is the only way I know to do it:

function contains(a, obj) {
    for (var i = 0; i < a.length; i++) {
        if (a[i] === obj) {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

Is there a better and more concise way to accomplish this?

9
  • 52
    just tested: your way is actually the fastest for across browsers: jsperf.com/find-element-in-obj-vs-array/2 (apart from pre-saving a.length in a variable) while using indexOf (as in $.inArray) is much slower – Jörn Berkefeld Jul 2 '12 at 11:56
  • 18
    many have replied that the Array#indexOf is your best choice here. But if you want something that can be correctly cast to Boolean, use this: ~[1,2,3].indexOf(4) will return 0 which will evaluate as false, whereas ~[1,2,3].indexOf(3) will return -3 which will evaluate as true. – lordvlad Oct 2 '13 at 7:59
  • 8
    ~ is not what you want to use to convert to a boolean, for that you need !. But in this case you want to check equality with -1, s o the function might endreturn [1,2,3].indexOf(3) === -1; ~ is a binary not, it will invert each bit of the value individually. – mcfedr Jun 20 '14 at 12:49
  • 16
    @Iordvlad [1,2,3].indexOf(4) will actually return -1. As @mcfedr pointed out, ~ is the bitwise-NOT operator, see ES5 11.4.8. Thing is, since the binary representation of -1 consists of only 1's, it's complement is 0, which evaluates as false. The complement of any other number will be non-zero, hence true. So, ~ works just fine and is often used in conjunction with indexOf. – mknecht Mar 14 '15 at 5:35
  • 5
    The title is misleading. Where is the [[1,2],[3,4]].includes([3,4]) ? – mplungjan Apr 2 '17 at 9:20

54 Answers 54

1
2
5

Here's how Prototype does it:

/**
 *  Array#indexOf(item[, offset = 0]) -> Number
 *  - item (?): A value that may or may not be in the array.
 *  - offset (Number): The number of initial items to skip before beginning the
 *      search.
 *
 *  Returns the position of the first occurrence of `item` within the array &mdash; or
 *  `-1` if `item` doesn't exist in the array.
**/
function indexOf(item, i) {
  i || (i = 0);
  var length = this.length;
  if (i < 0) i = length + i;
  for (; i < length; i++)
    if (this[i] === item) return i;
  return -1;
}

Also see here for how they hook it up.

5

You can also use this trick:

var arrayContains = function(object) {
  return (serverList.filter(function(currentObject) {
    if (currentObject === object) {
      return currentObject
    }
    else {
      return false;
    }
  }).length > 0) ? true : false
}
1
  • this seems convoluted. 'object' is a poor name, 'item' might be better. the filter function logic should just be return currentObject === item; and the ternary operator is uncessary.. – TygerKrash Aug 5 '16 at 11:15
5
  1. Either use Array.indexOf(Object).
  2. With ECMA 7 one can use the Array.includes(Object).
  3. With ECMA 6 you can use Array.find(FunctionName) where FunctionName is a user defined function to search for the object in the array.

    Hope this helps!

5

It has one parameter: an array numbers of objects. Each object in the array has two integer properties denoted by x and y. The function must return a count of all such objects in the array that satisfy numbers.x == numbers.y

var numbers = [ { x: 1, y: 1 },
                { x: 2, y: 3 },
                { x: 3, y: 3 },
                { x: 3, y: 4 },
                { x: 4, y: 5 } ];
var count = 0; 
var n = numbers.length;
for (var i =0;i<n;i++)
{
  if(numbers[i].x==numbers[i].y)
    {count+=1;}
}

alert(count);

1
  • How would you compare the value of x to the next items x value? This isnt working: for (var i = 0; i < n; i++) { if (numbers[i].x == (numbers[i] + 1).x) { count += 1; } } – armand Jun 13 '18 at 13:32
4

Use:

Array.prototype.contains = function(x){
  var retVal = -1;

  // x is a primitive type
  if(["string","number"].indexOf(typeof x)>=0 ){ retVal = this.indexOf(x);}

  // x is a function
  else if(typeof x =="function") for(var ix in this){
    if((this[ix]+"")==(x+"")) retVal = ix;
  }

  //x is an object...
  else {
    var sx=JSON.stringify(x);
    for(var ix in this){
      if(typeof this[ix] =="object" && JSON.stringify(this[ix])==sx) retVal = ix;
    }
  }

  //Return False if -1 else number if numeric otherwise string
  return (retVal === -1)?false : ( isNaN(+retVal) ? retVal : +retVal);
}

I know it's not the best way to go, but since there is no native IComparable way to interact between objects, I guess this is as close as you can get to compare two entities in an array. Also, extending Array object might not be a wise thing to do, but sometimes it's OK (if you are aware of it and the trade-off).

1
  • Late note: this doesn't work with, say, contains([{ a: 1, b: 2 }], { b: 2, a: 1 }) because the stringified objects maintain the order of the properties. – Heretic Monkey Oct 10 '19 at 15:13
4

Or this solution:

Array.prototype.includes = function (object) {
  return !!+~this.indexOf(object);
};
4

If you're working with ES6 You can use a set:

function arrayHas( array, element ) {
    const s = new Set(array);
    return s.has(element)
}

This should be more performant than just about any other method

1
  • 3
    How is it more performant? At the very least you have to construct the set, which is O(n) (you have to iterate over the array). Just doing linear search (like indexOf does) is also O(n), but only in the worst case. The average case complexity is more like n/2, since if the array includes the element, you'll likely stop somewhere in the middle. Therefore, this method is, on average, slower than Array#includes and Array#indexOf. – Konstantin Mar 30 '18 at 7:43
4

I recommended to use underscore library because its return the value and its supported for all browsers.

underscorejs

 var findValue = _.find(array, function(item) {
    return item.id == obj.id;
 });
4

Use includes javascript in-build function, but not work in Internet Explorer

var optval = [];

optval.push('A');    
optval.push('B');    
optval.push('C');

We can search string A in javascript array as:

optval.includes('A') // =====> return true
4

Use indexOf()

You can use the indexOf() method to check whether a given value or element exists in an array or not. The indexOf() method returns the index of the element inside the array if it is found, and returns -1 if it not found. Let's take a look at the following example:

var fruits = ["Apple", "Banana", "Mango", "Orange", "Papaya"];
var a = "Mango";
checkArray(a, fruits);


function checkArray(a, fruits) {
  // Check if a value exists in the fruits array
  if (fruits.indexOf(a) !== -1) {
    return document.write("true");
  } else {
    return document.write("false");
  }
}

Use include() Method

ES6 has introduced the includes() method to perform this task very easily. But, this method returns only true or false instead of index number:

var fruits = ["Apple", "Banana", "Mango", "Orange", "Papaya"];
alert(fruits.includes("Banana")); // Outputs: true
alert(fruits.includes("Coconut")); // Outputs: false
alert(fruits.includes("Orange")); // Outputs: true
alert(fruits.includes("Cherry")); // Outputs: false

For further reference checkout here

3

Similar thing: Finds the first element by a "search lambda":

Array.prototype.find = function(search_lambda) {
  return this[this.map(search_lambda).indexOf(true)];
};

Usage:

[1,3,4,5,8,3,5].find(function(item) { return item % 2 == 0 })
=> 4

Same in coffeescript:

Array.prototype.find = (search_lambda) -> @[@map(search_lambda).indexOf(true)]
2
  • This certainly is much more flexible than many of the other approaches. If one is uncomfortable with the prototype one might consider something like var positionIf = function (predicate,sequence) {return sequence.map(predicate).indexOf(true);}; – dat Jun 5 '13 at 21:28
  • 3
    A more efficient way to implement this method would be to use a loop and stop applying search_lambda once something is found. – Casey Chu Oct 10 '13 at 4:49
3

As others have mentioned you can use Array.indexOf, but it isn't available in all browsers. Here's the code from https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Array/indexOf to make it work the same in older browsers.

indexOf is a recent addition to the ECMA-262 standard; as such it may not be present in all browsers. You can work around this by inserting the following code at the beginning of your scripts, allowing use of indexOf in implementations which do not natively support it. This algorithm is exactly the one specified in ECMA-262, 5th edition, assuming Object, TypeError, Number, Math.floor, Math.abs, and Math.max have their original value.

if (!Array.prototype.indexOf) {
    Array.prototype.indexOf = function (searchElement /*, fromIndex */ ) {
        "use strict";
        if (this == null) {
            throw new TypeError();
        }
        var t = Object(this);
        var len = t.length >>> 0;
        if (len === 0) {
            return -1;
        }
        var n = 0;
        if (arguments.length > 1) {
            n = Number(arguments[1]);
            if (n != n) { // shortcut for verifying if it's NaN
                n = 0;
            } else if (n != 0 && n != Infinity && n != -Infinity) {
                n = (n > 0 || -1) * Math.floor(Math.abs(n));
            }
        }
        if (n >= len) {
            return -1;
        }
        var k = n >= 0 ? n : Math.max(len - Math.abs(n), 0);
        for (; k < len; k++) {
            if (k in t && t[k] === searchElement) {
                return k;
            }
        }
        return -1;
    }
}
3

Using idnexOf() it is a good solution, but you should hide embedded implementation indexOf() function which returns -1 with ~ operator:

function include(arr,obj) { 
    return !!(~arr.indexOf(obj)); 
} 
3

I was working on a project that I needed a functionality like python set which removes all duplicates values and returns a new list, so I wrote this function maybe useful to someone

function set(arr) {
    var res = [];
    for (var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
        if (res.indexOf(arr[i]) === -1) {
            res.push(arr[i]);
        }
    }
    return res;
}
3

In Addition to what others said, if you don't have a reference of the object which you want to search in the array, then you can do something like this.

let array = [1, 2, 3, 4, {"key": "value"}];

array.some((element) => JSON.stringify(element) === JSON.stringify({"key": "value"})) // true

array.some((element) => JSON.stringify(element) === JSON.stringify({})) // true

Array.some returns true if any element matches the given condition and returns false if none of the elements matches the given condition.

1
  • 1
    Late note: this doesn't work with, say, contains([{ a: 1, b: 2 }], { b: 2, a: 1 }) because the stringified objects maintain the order of the properties. – Heretic Monkey Oct 10 '19 at 15:12
3

Adding a unique item to a another list

searchResults: [
                {
                    name: 'Hello',
                    artist: 'Selana',
                    album: 'Riga',
                    id: 1,
                },
                {
                    name: 'Hello;s',
                    artist: 'Selana G',
                    album: 'Riga1',
                    id: 2,
                },
                {
                    name: 'Hello2',
                    artist: 'Selana',
                    album: 'Riga11',
                    id: 3,
                }
            ],
            playlistTracks: [
              {
                name: 'Hello',
                artist: 'Mamunuus',
                album: 'Riga',
                id: 4,
              },
              {
                name: 'Hello;s',
                artist: 'Mamunuus G',
                album: 'Riga1',
                id: 2,
              },
              {
                name: 'Hello2',
                artist: 'Mamunuus New',
                album: 'Riga11',
                id: 3,
              }
            ],
            playlistName: "New PlayListTrack",
        };
    }

    // Adding an unique track in the playList
    addTrack = track => {
      if(playlistTracks.find(savedTrack => savedTrack.id === track.id)) {
        return;
      }
      playlistTracks.push(track);

      this.setState({
        playlistTracks
      })
    };
1
  • 6
    What does it have to do with the question asked? – stefanowiczp Feb 6 '20 at 14:30
3

use Array.prototype.includes for example:

const fruits = ['coconut', 'banana', 'apple']

const doesFruitsHaveCoconut = fruits.includes('coconut')// true

console.log(doesFruitsHaveCoconut)

maybe read this documentation from MDN: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Array/includes

2

I looked through submitted answers and got that they only apply if you search for the object via reference. A simple linear search with reference object comparison.

But lets say you don't have the reference to an object, how will you find the correct object in the array? You will have to go linearly and deep compare with each object. Imagine if the list is too large, and the objects in it are very big containing big pieces of text. The performance drops drastically with the number and size of the elements in the array.

You can stringify objects and put them in the native hash table, but then you will have data redundancy remembering these keys cause JavaScript keeps them for 'for i in obj', and you only want to check if the object exists or not, that is, you have the key.

I thought about this for some time constructing a JSON Schema validator, and I devised a simple wrapper for the native hash table, similar to the sole hash table implementation, with some optimization exceptions which I left to the native hash table to deal with. It only needs performance benchmarking... All the details and code can be found on my blog: http://stamat.wordpress.com/javascript-quickly-find-very-large-objects-in-a-large-array/ I will soon post benchmark results.

The complete solution works like this:

var a = {'a':1,
 'b':{'c':[1,2,[3,45],4,5],
 'd':{'q':1, 'b':{'q':1, 'b':8},'c':4},
 'u':'lol'},
 'e':2};

 var b = {'a':1, 
 'b':{'c':[2,3,[1]],
 'd':{'q':3,'b':{'b':3}}},
 'e':2};

 var c = "Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged. It was popularised in the 1960s with the release of Letraset sheets containing Lorem Ipsum passages, and more recently with desktop publishing software like Aldus PageMaker including versions of Lorem Ipsum.";

 var hc = new HashCache([{a:3, b:2, c:5}, {a:15, b:2, c:'foo'}]); //init

 hc.put({a:1, b:1});
 hc.put({b:1, a:1});
 hc.put(true);
 hc.put('true');
 hc.put(a);
 hc.put(c);
 hc.put(d);
 console.log(hc.exists('true'));
 console.log(hc.exists(a));
 console.log(hc.exists(c));
 console.log(hc.exists({b:1, a:1}));
 hc.remove(a);
 console.log(hc.exists(c));
0
1

Simple solution : ES6 Features "includes" method

let arr = [1, 2, 3, 2, 3, 2, 3, 4];

  arr.includes(2) // true

  arr.includes(93) // false
1

This may be a detailed and easy solution.

//plain array
var arr = ['a', 'b', 'c'];
var check = arr.includes('a');
console.log(check); //returns true
if (check)
{
   // value exists in array
   //write some codes
}

// array with objects
var arr = [
      {x:'a', y:'b'},
      {x:'p', y:'q'}
  ];

// if you want to check if x:'p' exists in arr
var check = arr.filter(function (elm){
    if (elm.x == 'p')
    {
       return elm; // returns length = 1 (object exists in array)
    }
});

// or y:'q' exists in arr
var check = arr.filter(function (elm){
    if (elm.y == 'q')
    {
       return elm; // returns length = 1 (object exists in array)
    }
});

// if you want to check, if the entire object {x:'p', y:'q'} exists in arr
var check = arr.filter(function (elm){
    if (elm.x == 'p' && elm.y == 'q')
    {
       return elm; // returns length = 1 (object exists in array)
    }
});

// in all cases
console.log(check.length); // returns 1

if (check.length > 0)
{
   // returns true
   // object exists in array
   //write some codes
}
1

Object.keys for getting all property names of the object and filter all values that exact or partial match with specified string.

function filterByValue(array, string) {
  return array.filter(o =>
    Object.keys(o).some(k => o[k].toLowerCase().includes(string.toLowerCase())));
}

const arrayOfObject = [{
  name: 'Paul',
  country: 'Canada',
}, {
  name: 'Lea',
  country: 'Italy',
}, {
  name: 'John',
  country: 'Italy'
}];

console.log(filterByValue(arrayOfObject, 'lea')); // [{name: 'Lea', country: 'Italy'}]
console.log(filterByValue(arrayOfObject, 'ita')); // [{name: 'Lea', country: 'Italy'}, {name: 'John', country: 'Italy'}]

You can also filter by specific key such as.

Object.keys(o).some(k => o.country.toLowerCase().includes(string.toLowerCase())));

Now you can just check array count after filtered to check value contains or not.

Hope it's helpful.

0

You can use findIndex function to check if an array has a specific value.

arrObj.findIndex(obj => obj === comparedValue) !== -1;

Returns true if arrObj contains comparedValue, false otherwise.

-4

Literally:

(using Firefox v3.6, with for-in caveats as previously noted (HOWEVER the use below might endorse for-in for this very purpose! That is, enumerating array elements that ACTUALLY exist via a property index (HOWEVER, in particular, the array length property is NOT enumerated in the for-in property list!).).)

(Drag & drop the following complete URI's for immediate mode browser testing.)

JavaScript:

  function ObjInRA(ra){var has=false; for(i in ra){has=true; break;} return has;}

  function check(ra){
      return ['There is ',ObjInRA(ra)?'an':'NO',' object in [',ra,'].'].join('')
  }
  alert([
            check([{}]), check([]), check([,2,3]),
            check(['']), '\t (a null string)', check([,,,])
        ].join('\n'));

which displays:

There is an object in [[object Object]].
There is NO object in [].
There is an object in [,2,3].
There is an object in [].
     (a null string)
There is NO object in [,,].

Wrinkles: if looking for a "specific" object consider:

JavaScript: alert({}!={}); alert({}!=={});

And thus:

JavaScript:

 obj = {prop:"value"}; 
 ra1 = [obj]; 
 ra2 = [{prop:"value"}];
 alert(ra1[0] == obj); 
 alert(ra2[0] == obj);

Often ra2 is considered to "contain" obj as the literal entity {prop:"value"}.

A very coarse, rudimentary, naive (as in code needs qualification enhancing) solution:

JavaScript:

  obj={prop:"value"};   ra2=[{prop:"value"}];
  alert(
    ra2 . toSource() . indexOf( obj.toSource().match(/^.(.*).$/)[1] ) != -1 ?
      'found' :
      'missing' );

See ref: Searching for objects in JavaScript arrays.

0
-9

Just another option

// usage: if ( ['a','b','c','d'].contains('b') ) { ... }
Array.prototype.contains = function(value){
    for (var key in this)
        if (this[key] === value) return true;
    return false;
}

Be careful because overloading javascript array objects with custom methods can disrupt the behavior of other javascripts, causing unexpected behavior.

4
1
2

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