228

I need a shell command or script that converts a Unix timestamp to a date. The input can come either from the first parameter or from stdin, allowing for the following usage patterns:

ts2date 1267619929

and

echo 1267619929 | ts2date

Both commands should output "Wed Mar 3 13:38:49 2010".

13 Answers 13

460

On later versions of common Linux distributions you can use:

date -d @1267619929
  • 4
    One-liner: date -d @$(date -u +%s) – Mike Atlas Jan 5 '16 at 17:30
  • 22
    What is the @ for? I don't see that in the GNU man page at all. – Mark E. Haase Feb 1 '16 at 3:06
  • 11
    @mehaase - the man page notes that the date string is too complex to be documented in the manpage, so it is described in info: info '(coreutils) date invocation' – MByD Mar 23 '16 at 8:48
  • 8
    brew install coreutils; gdate -d @1267619929 – Mark Fox May 23 '17 at 22:21
145
date -r <number>

works for me on Mac OS X.

  • 5
    Yes, but it doesn't handle fractions of a second. – mgold Oct 31 '13 at 22:21
  • 1
    And it's confusing because it's not working in that way on most linux systems, because: freddy@hades ~ % date --help | grep -- -r -r, --reference=FILE display the last modification time of FILE – frank42 Sep 19 '17 at 16:02
27

This version is similar to chiborg's answer, but it eliminates the need for the external tty and cat. It uses date, but could just as easily use gawk. You can change the shebang and replace the double square brackets with single ones and this will also run in sh.

#!/bin/bash
LANG=C
if [[ -z "$1" ]]
then
    if [[ -p /dev/stdin ]]    # input from a pipe
    then
        read -r p
    else
        echo "No timestamp given." >&2
        exit
    fi
else
    p=$1
fi
date -d "@$p" +%c
  • +1: very complete answer and I think date is faster than gawk. – Bruno Brant Mar 3 '10 at 14:19
  • @Bruno, how do you know date is faster than gawk.? – ghostdog74 Mar 3 '10 at 14:23
  • 3
    @Bruno, @ghostdog74: On my system, gawk is (very roughly) 15% faster than date in a timed for loop consisting only of gawk 'BEGIN { print strftime("%c", 1256571985); }' or date -d '@1256571985' +%c with output redirected to /dev/null. – Dennis Williamson Mar 3 '10 at 14:57
  • I chose this as the "best" answer because the script satisfies the "date input via parameter or stdin" better. Thanks for enhancing my shellscripting skills! – chiborg Mar 8 '10 at 21:31
  • 3
    Note that my answer meets the OP's requirements as stated in the question, but the now accepted answer doesn't. – Dennis Williamson Sep 26 '14 at 15:19
17

You can use GNU date, for example,

$ sec=1267619929
$ date -d "UTC 1970-01-01 $sec secs"

or

$ date -ud @1267619929
10

You can use this simple awk script:

#!/bin/gawk -f   
{ print strftime("%c", $0); }

Sample usage:

$ echo '1098181096' | ./a.awk 
Tue 19 Oct 2004 03:18:16 AM PDT
$
  • This doesn't fit the first usage - sometimes I don't want to echo the TS and use a parameter instead. – chiborg Mar 3 '10 at 12:52
  • On some old busybox version, date -s @ doesn't work, and awk still does! An example without a stdin would be helpful too. – Victor Sergienko Jan 31 '17 at 18:07
6

I use this when converting log files or monitoring them:

tail -f <log file> | gawk \
'{ printf strftime("%c", $1); for (i=2; i<NF; i++) printf $i " "; print $NF }'
  • exactly what I was looking for, can be shortened to awk '{ printf strftime("%c: ", $1); $1 = ""; print $0; }' – ChrisWue May 27 at 7:36
5

Since Bash 4.2 you can use printf's %(datefmt)T format:

$ printf '%(%c)T\n' 1267619929
Wed 03 Mar 2010 01:38:49 PM CET

That's nice, because it's a shell builtin. The format for datefmt is a string accepted by strftime(3) (see man 3 strftime). Here %c is:

%c The preferred date and time representation for the current locale.


Now if you want a script that accepts an argument and, if none is provided, reads stdin, you can proceed as:

#!/bin/bash

if (($#)); then
    printf '%(%c)T\n' "$@"
else
    while read -r line; do
        printf '%(%c)T\n' "$line"
    done
fi
3

I have written a script that does this myself:

#!/bin/bash
LANG=C
if [ -z "$1" ]; then
    if [  "$(tty)" = "not a tty" ]; then
            p=`cat`;
    else
            echo "No timestamp given."
            exit
    fi
else
    p=$1
fi
echo $p | gawk '{ print strftime("%c", $0); }'
  • 1
    Your question tags include "bash", but your shebang says "sh". – Dennis Williamson Mar 3 '10 at 13:26
  • Thanks, fixed it. – chiborg Mar 3 '10 at 13:42
3

In this answer I copy Dennis Williamson's answer and modify it slightly to allow a vast speed increase when piping a column of many timestamps to the script. For example, piping 1000 timestamps to the original script with xargs -n1 on my machine took 6.929s as opposed to 0.027s with this modified version:

#!/bin/bash
LANG=C
if [[ -z "$1" ]]
then
    if [[ -p /dev/stdin ]]    # input from a pipe
    then
        cat - | gawk '{ print strftime("%c", $1); }'
    else
        echo "No timestamp given." >&2
        exit
    fi
else
    date -d @$1 +%c
fi
3

In OSX, or BSD, there's an equivalent -r flag which apparently takes a unix timestamp. Here's an example that runs date four times: once for the first date, to show what it is; one for the conversion to unix timestamp with %s, and finally, one which, with -r, converts what %s provides back to a string.

$  date; date +%s; date -r `date +%s`
Tue Oct 24 16:27:42 CDT 2017
1508880462
Tue Oct 24 16:27:42 CDT 2017

At least, seems to work on my machine.

$ uname -a
Darwin XXX-XXXXXXXX 16.7.0 Darwin Kernel Version 16.7.0: Thu Jun 15 17:36:27 PDT 2017; root:xnu-3789.70.16~2/RELEASE_X86_64 x86_64
  • If you already have a timestamp value and you just need to find the equivalent date, in OS X you can just type this at the command line: date -r 1509453417 – Noel Whitemore Oct 31 '17 at 12:21
  • 1
    That's true. If you look at my answer, I'm actually demonstrating that. – Daniel Farrell Nov 14 '17 at 21:41
1

some example:

$ date
Tue Mar 22 16:47:06 CST 2016

$ date -d "Tue Mar 22 16:47:06 CST 2016" "+%s"
1458636426

$ date +%s
1458636453

$ date -d @1458636426
Tue Mar 22 16:47:06 CST 2016

$ date --date='@1458636426'
Tue Mar 22 16:47:06 CST 2016


1

You can get formatted date from timestamp like this

date +'%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S' -d "@timestamp"
-7

In PHP

$unix_time = 1256571985;

echo date("Y-m-d H:i:s",$unix_time)
  • 5
    Nice, but I just wanted to use bash. – chiborg Mar 3 '10 at 12:53

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