58

I'm using Java 8 for my new project.

I'm trying to use new date and time api in java 8 however I don't know if JPA 2.1 fully supports this new Date and Time API or not.

Please share your experience/opinion in JPA`s supports for new date and time API in Java 8.

Can I use new date and time api in Java 8 safely with JPA 2.1?

UPDATE:

I'm using Hibernate (4.3.5.Final) as JPA implementation.

2
  • Have a look at this : javajeedevelopment.blogspot.fr/2016/11/… Nov 21, 2016 at 13:13
  • This is the principal reason -not- to use Java reference types for temporal data in the database layer. If the database format for date-times is a numeric format, such as a Modified Julian Day number (can hold a date-time to millisecond precision in a double), there is never a problem with ORM support. Moreover, the Converter facility that is part of JPA 2.1 makes interconversion between numeric formats and objects in the time library of your choosing super easy.
    – scottb
    Oct 10, 2017 at 16:59

8 Answers 8

73

For Hibernate 5.X just add

    <dependency>
        <groupId>org.hibernate</groupId>
        <artifactId>hibernate-java8</artifactId>
        <version>${hibernate.version}</version>
    </dependency>

and

@NotNull
@Column(name = "date_time", nullable = false)
protected LocalDateTime dateTime;

will work without any additional effort. See https://hibernate.atlassian.net/browse/HHH-8844

UPDATE:

Please have a look at Jeff Morin comment: since Hibernate 5.2.x it is enough

 <dependency>
     <groupId>org.hibernate</groupId>
     <artifactId>hibernate-core</artifactId>
     <version>5.2.1.Final</version>
 </dependency>
 <dependency>
     <groupId>org.springframework</groupId>
     <artifactId>spring-...</artifactId>
     <version>4.3.1.RELEASE</version>
 </dependency>

See https://github.com/hibernate/hibernate-orm/wiki/Migration-Guide---5.2 and Integrate Hibernate 5.2 with Spring framework 4.x

3
  • 8
    Starting with Hibernate 5.2.x this addition is not necessary anymore since these Java 8 features were merged into Hibernate Core.
    – Jeff Morin
    Jul 15, 2016 at 14:26
  • 1
    Thanks! Together with migration to Spring 4.3.x (stackoverflow.com/questions/37651837/…) works! Jul 15, 2016 at 16:26
  • While I don't understand, what would happen if hibernate does not support new date api? Now for LocalDateTime columns they are stored as blob type in mysql, do you think this is the right behavior?
    – Tiina
    Jun 17, 2017 at 6:21
21

JPA 2.1 is a spec that came out before Java 1.8, so doesn't mandate any support for it. Obviously some implementations may support some Java 1.8 features. Some have problems with Java 1.8 bytecode (e.g EclipseLink). I know DataNucleus supports java.time and Java 1.8 since that's the one I use. You'd have to check your implementation for what its support level is.

It has been requested that JPA 2.2 support the java.time types, see this issue https://java.net/jira/browse/JPA_SPEC-63

7
  • Thanks. I'm using Hibernate as JPA implementation as in updated question. May 18, 2014 at 6:10
  • 1
    Anyone can search for Hibernate support for such things. You find this hibernate.atlassian.net/browse/HHH-8844 so no, your selected JPA implementation doesn't support it May 18, 2014 at 10:07
  • EclipseLink has no longer any problem with Java 8 bytecode.
    – eskatos
    Jun 6, 2014 at 19:11
  • 2
    Oh, my bad, EclipseLink 2.5.1 fails if a lambda expression is present in an entity class. Not the case for me, that's why everything work has expected. See bugs.eclipse.org/bugs/show_bug.cgi?id=429992
    – eskatos
    Jun 7, 2014 at 9:42
  • 2
    The link is broken.
    – thatsIch
    Oct 17, 2017 at 6:21
13

JPA 2.2 supports java.time

JPA 2.2 now supports LocalDate, LocalTime, LocalDateTime, OffsetTime and OffsetDateTime.

<dependency>
  <groupId>javax.persistence</groupId>
  <artifactId>javax.persistence-api</artifactId>
  <version>2.2</version>
</dependency>

For JPA 2.2 implementation, Hibernate 5.2 or EclipseLink 2.7 can be used.

Hibernate 5 supports more java types than JPA 2.2 like Duration, Instant and ZonedDateTime.

More Info:

9

org.jadira.usertype can be used to persist JSR 310 Date and Time API.

Check out this example project.

From Example Project,

@MappedSuperclass
public class AbstractEntity {

    @Id @GeneratedValue Long id;

    @CreatedDate//
    @Type(type = "org.jadira.usertype.dateandtime.threeten.PersistentZonedDateTime")//
    ZonedDateTime createdDate;

    @LastModifiedDate//
    @Type(type = "org.jadira.usertype.dateandtime.threeten.PersistentZonedDateTime")//
    ZonedDateTime modifiedDate;
}
2
9

I am using Java 8, EclipseLink(JPA 2.1), PostgreSQL 9.3 and PostgreSQL Driver -Postgresql-9.2-1002.jdbc4.jar in my project and I can use LocalDateTime variables from the new API with no error, but the data type of the column will be bytea in the database. You can only read it from a Java application as far i know.

However, you can use AttributeConverter to convert these classes to java.sql.Date. I found this code from Java.net

@Converter(autoApply = true)
public class LocalDatePersistenceConverter implements
AttributeConverter {
@Override
public java.sql.Date convertToDatabaseColumn(LocalDate entityValue) {
    return java.sql.Date.valueOf(entityValue);
}

@Override
public LocalDate convertToEntityAttribute(java.sql.Date databaseValue) {
    return databaseValue.toLocalDate();
}
3
3

I know that this is an old question but I thought of an alternative solution which might be helpful.

Instead of trying to map the new java.time.* classes to an existing database types, you can leverage @Transient:

@Entity
public class Person {
    private Long id;        
    private Timestamp createdTimestamp;

    @Id
    @GeneratedValue
    public Long getId() { return id; }

    private Timestamp getCreatedTimestamp() {
        return createdTime;
    }

    private void setCreatedTimestamp(final Timestamp ts) {
        this.createdTimestamp = ts;
    }

    @Transient
    public LocalDateTime getCreatedDateTime() {
        return createdTime.getLocalDateTime();
    }

    public void setCreatedDateTime(final LocalDateTime dt) {
        this.createdTime = Timestamp.valueOf(dt);
    }
}

You work with the public getter/setter methods that use the new Java 8 date/time classes, but behind the scenes the getter/setters work with the legacy date/time classes. When you persist the entity, the legacy date/time property will be persisted but not the new Java 8 property since it's annotated with @Transient.

2
  • 2
    you forgot to declare the LocalDateTime createdTime variable in the code. Dec 23, 2014 at 18:36
  • 3
    and also private getter/setter for persistent fields (the Timestamp) are not allowed in JPA specification it must be at least Protected but some JPA implementations ignore it and it works but not the standard Dec 23, 2014 at 18:45
1

For type TIMESTAMP you can use this converter:

@Converter(autoApply = true)
public class LocalDateTimeAttributeConverter implements AttributeConverter<LocalDateTime, Timestamp> {

    @Override
    public Timestamp convertToDatabaseColumn(LocalDateTime datetime) {
        return datetime == null ? null : Timestamp.valueOf(datetime);
    }

    @Override
    public LocalDateTime convertToEntityAttribute(Timestamp timestamp) {
        return timestamp == null ? null : timestamp.toLocalDateTime();
    }

}

For type DATE you can use this converter:

@Converter(autoApply = true)
public class LocalDateAttributeConverter implements AttributeConverter<LocalDate, Date> {

    @Override
    public Date convertToDatabaseColumn(LocalDate date) {
        return date == null ? null : Date.valueOf(date);
    }

    @Override
    public LocalDate convertToEntityAttribute(Date date) {
        return date == null ? null : date.toLocalDate();
    }

}

For type TIME you can use this converter:

@Converter(autoApply = true)
public class LocalTimeAttributeConverter implements AttributeConverter<LocalTime, Time> {

    @Override
    public Time convertToDatabaseColumn(LocalTime time) {
        return time == null ? null : Time.valueOf(time);
    }

    @Override
    public LocalTime convertToEntityAttribute(Time time) {
        return time == null ? null : time.toLocalTime();
    }

}
0

There are Many approach to do , Also It depends to your frame work : If your frame work has on field Converter such spring do such: 1-

@DateTimeFormat(pattern = "dd.MM.yyyy - HH:mm")
private Long createdDate;

here I am using legacy epoch format https://www.epochconverter.com/ epoch is very flexible and accepted format

2- The other ways is to use jpa @PostLoad @PreUpdate @PrePersist

@PostLoad
      public void convert() {
        this.jva8Date= LocalDate.now().plusDays(1);
      }

or use temp one such

@Transient
public LocalDateTime getCreatedDateTime() {
    return createdTime.getLocalDateTime();
}

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