20

Suppose I have a container:

 <div id="container"> This is a red apple </div>

How to color a word "red" with red color? Something like (pseudocode)

#container:[word="red"]{
   color:red;
}

Is it possible to do this in pure CSS without introducing JavaScript or modifying the existing HTML?

  • 6
    you must use javascript to look it and, break the sentence and have the word you want inside it's own tag. see - stackoverflow.com/q/119441/104380 – vsync May 19 '14 at 12:31
  • 2
    @Daniele94 It was actually me, since not a single one of the questions actually addresses the OP's problem. He is wanting some sort of search-and-replace function to replace words with a coloured replacement. While this isn't possible with CSS alone, it's very easy with javascript. The first comment by vsync should help the OP. – Ben Fortune May 19 '14 at 12:36
  • 6
    with just CSS it's not possible. – shyammakwana.me May 19 '14 at 12:37
  • 1
    @Daniele94 because I know how to do it with js. I am searching for better and simpler solution – nicael May 19 '14 at 12:43
  • 3
    A solution for this with pure CSS is only limited possible. Have a look at the article 10 jQuery text highlighter plugins for a few jQuery plugins which can handle this task better, e.g. mark.js. – dude May 24 '16 at 6:41

13 Answers 13

12

Not to prove a point, but to answer your question - this is possible in CSS without JS: Example

In short: we set a black background color for text color and a red background image for the specific red string. We remove the original text fill using -webkit-text-fill-color. The background is clipped to the text outline using -webkit-background-clip: text; and the red image is sized and positioned over whatever text string we want to color.

Please note: I would never recommend using this for any live website. This works in webkit only as it's based on non-standard wekbit-specific CSS rules. And the color is not really bound to the colored text string - it's completely static.

Edit: Here's the CSS:

#container {
    -webkit-text-fill-color: transparent;
    -webkit-background-clip: text;
    background-size: 1.5em 1em;
    background-repeat: no-repeat;
    background-position: 3.4em 0;
    background-color: #000;
    background-image: url(data:image/jpeg;base64,/9j/4AAQSkZJRgABAQEAYABgAAD/2wBDAAIBAQIBAQICAgICAgICAwUDAwMDAwYEBAMFBwYHBwcGBwcICQsJCAgKCAcHCg0KCgsMDAwMBwkODw0MDgsMDAz/2wBDAQICAgMDAwYDAwYMCAcIDAwMDAwMDAwMDAwMDAwMDAwMDAwMDAwMDAwMDAwMDAwMDAwMDAwMDAwMDAwMDAwMDAz/wAARCAABAAEDASIAAhEBAxEB/8QAHwAAAQUBAQEBAQEAAAAAAAAAAAECAwQFBgcICQoL/8QAtRAAAgEDAwIEAwUFBAQAAAF9AQIDAAQRBRIhMUEGE1FhByJxFDKBkaEII0KxwRVS0fAkM2JyggkKFhcYGRolJicoKSo0NTY3ODk6Q0RFRkdISUpTVFVWV1hZWmNkZWZnaGlqc3R1dnd4eXqDhIWGh4iJipKTlJWWl5iZmqKjpKWmp6ipqrKztLW2t7i5usLDxMXGx8jJytLT1NXW19jZ2uHi4+Tl5ufo6erx8vP09fb3+Pn6/8QAHwEAAwEBAQEBAQEBAQAAAAAAAAECAwQFBgcICQoL/8QAtREAAgECBAQDBAcFBAQAAQJ3AAECAxEEBSExBhJBUQdhcRMiMoEIFEKRobHBCSMzUvAVYnLRChYkNOEl8RcYGRomJygpKjU2Nzg5OkNERUZHSElKU1RVVldYWVpjZGVmZ2hpanN0dXZ3eHl6goOEhYaHiImKkpOUlZaXmJmaoqOkpaanqKmqsrO0tba3uLm6wsPExcbHyMnK0tPU1dbX2Nna4uPk5ebn6Onq8vP09fb3+Pn6/9oADAMBAAIRAxEAPwD5rooor8DP9oD/2Q==);
}
  • 2
    As I mentioned the color is not bound to the text - it have to be positioned manually. You can move it around by adjusting the background-position. This is one of the reasons I wouldn't use this for any live projects. I just felt compelled to answer as I love experimental CSS. – agrm May 24 '14 at 19:41
  • 1
    Isn't it too moved to the left? change background-position: 3.2em 0; to background-position: 3.4em 0;? – nicael May 24 '14 at 19:46
  • 1
    @AliGajani You can chain/comma-separate CSS background values to set more backgrounds and color more words. – agrm May 24 '14 at 20:53
  • 2
    Yes, I enjoyed reading your solution. A very clever hack Anders – Ali Gajani May 24 '14 at 21:25
  • 1
    As you correctly stated, I can agree with "I would never recommend using this for any live website.". This answer is not useful. Just change the text and you will see: jsfiddle.net/5qDLs/1 – TMS May 27 '14 at 9:35
23

Background

This is a Vanilla JavaScript solution because it ain't possible with CSS. Not joking, read the specification. You can match on an element, the name of an attribute in the element, and the value of a named attribute in an element. I don't see anything for matching content within an element though.

Introduction

Here's my shot at it. I am sure there is a sleeker way, but this is the gist of how it would start off as. Also, since there are a finite number of colors that you will want to colorify, it's nice to use a bunch of if statements like I have.

A better technique of course would be to do it more programmatically by building a color dictionary and hence make the code organized. But this works, and it's Vanilla JS. Apparently, I didn't have expertise in Regex, so I am sure a few lines are unnecessary.

Features

  • Works for multiple color occurrences
  • Works for multiple colors as visible

http://jsfiddle.net/TB62H/5/

var text = document.getElementById("content");
var str = text.innerHTML,
    reg = /red|blue|green|orange/ig; //g is to replace all occurances

//fixing a bit
var toStr = String(reg);
var color = (toStr.replace('\/g', '|')).substring(1);

//split it baby
var colors = color.split("|");

if (colors.indexOf("red") > -1) {
    str = str.replace(/red/g, '<span style="color:red;">red</span>');
}

if (colors.indexOf("blue") > -1) {
    str = str.replace(/blue/g, '<span style="color:blue;">blue</span>');
}

if (colors.indexOf("green") > -1) {
    str = str.replace(/green/g, '<span style="color:green;">green</span>');
}

if (colors.indexOf("orange") > -1) {
    str = str.replace(/orange/g, '<span style="color:orange;">orange</span>');
}


document.getElementById("updated").innerHTML = str;

Results

enter image description here

  • 3
    A suggestion: To make it scalable I'd go for storing the values using an array and then do a loop perhaps. Something like jsfiddle.net/mfirdaus/TB62H/7 – mfirdaus May 26 '14 at 0:51
  • Sorry, but using innerHTML (VanillaJS) or .html() (jQuery) is evil! It will destroy all events of the element and trigger generation of the DOM again and again. If definitely advise against this solution! Instead, have a look at mark.js, which was built exactly for this task with dozens of cross-browser unit tests. – dude May 24 '16 at 6:39
  • 1
    @julmot nice library there. Saved. – Ali Gajani May 24 '16 at 12:16
7

Sadly CSS does not have any selector right now to achieve what you need. You have to use JavaScript or Server Side Scripting to achieve what you want.

  • @TMS: No, we clearly say it isn't possible with CSS, but we do give JS based solutions, so the other answers should NOT be down-voted. – Ali Gajani May 27 '14 at 8:01
  • @AliGajani I concur – codefreaK May 31 '14 at 4:02
3
+50

Now if you allow me to use just a bit of javascript, and perhaps the caveat that I have no idea how well this will scale, might break a lot of CSS, and the implementation is a bit shoddy. That said, I think we can simply give css a bit of a hand by rewriting the HTML.

As you know we can add spans around the words and we can select that. But instead of just selecting the chosen one and attaching the style information, we span all the words. And attach the word as an value to the attribute "word". With the help of a way to get all the textNodes, it might look something like

//adapted from https://stackoverflow.com/a/10730777/1480215
function makeHighlightable(){
  var n, a=[], walk=document.createTreeWalker(document.body,NodeFilter.SHOW_TEXT,null,false);
  while(n=walk.nextNode()) a.push(n);
    for(var i=0;i<a.length;i++){
      var newSpan=document.createElement("span")
      var words=a[i].nodeValue.replace(/[\r\n]/g,"").split(' ');
        for(var j=0;j<words.length;j++){
            var escapedWord=words[j].replace(/[^a-zA-Z0-9-']/g,'').toLowerCase()
            words[j]='<span word="'+escapedWord+'">'+words[j]+'</span>'
        }
        words=words.join(" ")
        newSpan.innerHTML=words
        a[i].parentNode.replaceChild(newSpan,a[i])
    }
}

makeHighlightable()

With that in place, you can now do

#container [word=red]{ /* space instead of : */
    color:#F00;
}

Demo

and it might possibly work.

  • Why is it down voted? – nicael May 27 '14 at 11:56
  • @nicael I.. don't know? And thanks for the +1 – mfirdaus May 27 '14 at 12:04
  • 2
    Adding a span to every word? I don't really like it. – miguel-svq May 29 '14 at 22:16
  • 3
    word isn't a valid HTML attribute. You should use data-word instead. – James Donnelly May 30 '14 at 19:52
3

Simple but anyway RIGHT answer: NO.

Please, don't be rude with others in your comments, they took time to read your question, think about how they would solve such a problem, write an answer (or a comment) and... help YOU... they don't deserve be treated in a rude way.

Best regards and good look.

Miguel.

BTW: check Wrap certain word with <span> using jquery and http://forum.jquery.com/topic/wrapping-specific-words-inside-span-elements

2

Use <span> for this.

<div id="container"> This is a <span class="red">red</span> apple </div>

CSS:

.red {
color: red;
}

Edit
It isn't possible without any additional Javascript or HTML. According to the CSS3 specification there is no such selector (There were thoughts about a :contains() selector for CSS3). Also see this and this Question.

  • OP doesn't want to change the markup – Phlume May 19 '14 at 12:35
  • 2
    Posted my answer already before the edit, never mind. – Kimmax May 19 '14 at 12:36
2
  1. It cannot be done using only css selectors at present checkout documentation for CSS selectors

It can be easily Done with Jquery with a single line statements

Check Out the Demo

Highlighting and remove highlight on button click

The Simplest Solution when You Select a specific word with mouse that word would be highlighted throughout the Container

Jquery

var text = $('div').text().replace(/Ipsum/g,"<span class='red'>Ipsum</span>");
$('div').html(text);

EDIT:

$('#id1').click(
    function(){
    var text = $('div').text().replace(/Ipsum/g,"<span class='red'>Ipsum</span>");
$('div').html(text);
    }
);

$('#id2').click(
  function(){
      $( "span.red" ).each(function() {
  $( this ).contents().unwrap();

});

    }
);

CSS

.red {
color: red;
}

HTML

<div>Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged. It was popularised in the 1960s with the release of Letraset sheets containing Lorem Ipsum passages, and more recently with desktop publishing software like Aldus PageMaker including versions of Lorem Ipsum.
 </div>

EDIT:

<input type="button" value="Click to highlight" id="id1" />
<input type="button" value="Click to remove highlight" id="id2" />

  • 1
    your point 1 doesn't seem to be in English. – TMS May 27 '14 at 9:36
  • 2
    oh my god, reading from text() and writing to html(). don't let the web security people see this – guest May 29 '14 at 22:31
1

If you don't want to add html/javascript the simpel answer is NO you can't

Take a look at the following specification http://www.w3.org/TR/css3-selectors/#selectors

That are all available selectors for CSS3 and therefor it's simply impossible, and that's your answer.

You have 2 options left without changing the content one is all ready described here:

  • javascript
  • server-side parsing so everything gets wrapped with the span tag
1

Use pseudo elements to add the coloured word and some careful positioning to cover the initial black instance. It's dirty, but it works.

#container
{
    position: relative;
    font-family: monospace;
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
    font-size: 15px;
}

#container:after
{
    content: "red";
    color: red;
    position: absolute;
    left: 90px
}

Demo


EDIT: Also, a variation that works with proportional fonts (but doesn't render quite so cleanly, at least for me, in Chrome):

#container
{
    position: relative;
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
}

#container:before
{
    content: "This is a ";
    position: absolute;
    z-index: 2
}

#container:after
{
    content: "This is a red";
    color: red;
    position: absolute;
    left: 0;
    top: 0;
    z-index: 1
}

Demo 2

0

I don't understand why people say it's impossible to do it without JavaScript. I remember doing that kind of stuff with <span> like so:

<div id="container"> This is a <span style="color:red">red</span> apple </div>
-1

Here's some code that uses jQuery to wrap a class around the word red, which can be colored.

 <div id="container">This is a red apple</div>
 $("#container:contains('red')").each(function(){
     $(this).html($(this).html().replace("red", "<span class='red'>red</span>"));
 });
-1

I was dealing with this same issue. I had my base content wrapped in a

tag and all I did was surround each word I wanted highlighted in a tag and used CSS to change the colour of tags to red. Easy and simple.

e.g

<p>Base text, and then I want <p1>THIS</p1> word highlighted
</p>

p1 {
color: red;
}

Worked so well and did not mess up formatting at all.

  • Added emphasis - is it possible to do this in pure CSS without introducing JavaScript or modifying the existing HTML? – nicael Mar 22 '17 at 18:17
  • This answer is completely ignoring the question. – Mensur Grišević Sep 10 at 8:50
-3

You should use the span tag to surround the word "red"

<div id="container"> This is a <span>red</span> apple </div>    

Then select this span using

#container span {
    color: red;
}

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