8

I have created a custom exception:

class MyIOException : public std::exception
{
public:
  virtual const char* what() const throw()
  {
    return "IO Exception";
  } 
};

and

class MyEmptyImageException : public MyIOException
{
private:
  std::string m_bucketName;
  std::string m_objectName;

public:

  MyEmptyImageException(const std::string& bn, const std::string& on) : m_bucketName(bn), m_objectName(on) {}
  virtual const char* what() const throw()
  {
    std::string msg = "Empty Image : " + m_bucketName + m_objectName;
    return msg.c_str();
  }  
};

And I try it like this:

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
  try
  {
    // ... read image
    if (image.empty)
    {
      throw MyEmptyImageException(folderName, imageName);
    }
    // ... remained code
  }
  catch (MyEmptyImageException& meie)
  {
    std::cout << meie.what() << std::endl;
  }
  catch (std::exception& e)
  {
    std::cout << e.what() << std::endl;
  }
  return 0;
}

I am not sure if I have done it right, could you correct me, or suggest a better implementation, because I am a beginner in using derived exceptions?

  • 1
    What's the question here? – Rapptz May 19 '14 at 16:10
  • do you get any error? – Rakib May 19 '14 at 16:10
  • 1
    Note that your throw() specification in the second case is a lie. You may throw std::bad_alloc. – BoBTFish May 19 '14 at 16:12
  • 1
    Perhaps you're looking for a code review. – chris May 19 '14 at 16:12
  • The person just wants to know how to pass parameters to the exception – Nav May 19 '14 at 16:12
13

You have correctly passed the parameters to the constructor of your exception class.

But, the function MyEmptyImageException::what() is incorrect because it returns msg.c_str(), where msg is allocated on the stack. When the function what() returns, them msg object is destroyed, and the char* pointer points to the buffer managed by a deallocated object. To fix that, you can construct the message in the constructor of MyEmptyImageException itself:

class MyEmptyImageException : public MyIOException
{
  std::string m_msg;
public:

  MyEmptyImageException(const std::string& bn, const std::string& on)
    : m_msg(std::string("Empty Image : ") + bn + on)
  {}

  virtual const char* what() const throw()
  {
    return m_msg.c_str();
  }
};
  • 1
    Nope, code isn't right. Undefined behavior in MyEmptyImageException::what(). He's returning a pointer to a temporary buffer (the one managed by std::string msg). – Praetorian May 19 '14 at 16:15
  • @Praetorian Oups! You are right. I have modified the answer. – lrineau May 19 '14 at 16:23
  • 2
    A better solution than just making msg a member variable would be to construct the final message in the constructor itself. MyEmptyImageException(const std::string& bn, const std::string& on) : m_msg("Empty Image : " + bn + on) {}. This allows you to get rid of the other two, and now the throw() guarantee by what() is real. – Praetorian May 19 '14 at 16:28
  • @Praetorian: I suggest you write your own answer. I could modify mine using your suggestion, but I would prefer to upvote an answer of yours. – lrineau May 19 '14 at 16:29
  • No, go ahead and update yours. I haven't written an answer yet because the question is probably a better fit for CodeReview.SE – Praetorian May 19 '14 at 16:34

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