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While wrestling with how to subclass a tkinter Frame and LabelFrame so they sat on the correct parent, I found a lot of answers suggested that super().__init__ was better than BaseClass.__init()__ when subclassing.

So I tried it, to see what the fuss was about, and it doesn't seem to work at all. In python 2.7, it complains about the types of the arguments. In 3.4, it says there are multiple definitions for master. With super commented out as below, it works as expected. What am I doing wrong?

# import Tkinter as tki   # py 2.7
import tkinter as tki   # py 3.4

class App(tki.LabelFrame):
    def __init__(self, parent):
        tki.LabelFrame.__init__(self, master=parent, text='inner')
        # super().__init__(self, master=parent, text='inner')          #py 3.4
        # super(App, self).__init__(self, master=parent, text='inner') #py 2.7
        # super(App, self).__init__(master=parent, text='inner') #py 2.7

        self.quit = tki.Button(self, text='quit', command=exit)
        self.quit.grid()      

if __name__ == '__main__':    
    root = tki.Tk()
    root.title('nesting testing')

    outer = tki.LabelFrame(root, text='outer level')
    outer.pack()

    app = App(outer)
    app.pack()

    root.mainloop()

Dropping self in the call to super().__init__() was one of the first things I tried, but in py2.7 I still got the same error message, whether it was in there or not.

Without self:

Traceback (most recent call last):  
    File "C:\Python\TESTS\test_super.py", line 21, in <module>  
        app = App(outer)  
    File "C:\Python\TESTS\test_super.py", line 9, in __init__  
        super(App, self).__init__(master=parent, text='inner') #py 2.7  
TypeError: must be type, not classobj

With self:

Traceback (most recent call last):  
  File "C:\Python\TESTS\test_super.py", line 21, in <module>  
    app = App(outer)  
  File "C:\Python\TESTS\test_super.py", line 8, in __init__  
    super(App, self).__init__(self, master=parent, text='inner') #py 2.7  
TypeError: must be type, not classobj  

The fact that the error message stays the same as I drop self suggests that it's not the problem, but the fact it works OK with the BaseClass call is confusing me as to what could be wrong with the other arguments.

  • 1
  • To summarize that very useful link from @Veedrac: You can't use super with that class in Python 2.7 because it is an "old style" class (it does not inherit from object). In Python 3, all classes are "new style" and so super will work (including the new no-argument version). – Blckknght May 20 '14 at 7:31
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If I remember correct then

super().__init__(self, master=parent, text='inner')          #py 3.4
super(App, self).__init__(self, master=parent, text='inner') #py 2.7

should have been -

super().__init__(master=parent, text='inner')          #py 3.4
super(App, self).__init__(master=parent, text='inner') #py 2.7

Because you should not pass self as paramter to __init__ of super.

In fact when using instance methods, you should not pass self explicitly to any method, self is automatically provided when the call is made by the interpreter

BTW,

    tki.LabelFrame.__init__(self, master=parent, text='inner')
    super().__init__(self, master=parent, text='inner')          #py 3.4
    super(App, self).__init__(self, master=parent, text='inner') #py 2.7
    super(App, self).__init__(master=parent, text='inner') #py 2.7

All these calls are redundant. You should use only one of them. I would prefer -

    super().__init__(master=parent, text='inner')          #py 3.4

or

    super(App, self).__init__(master=parent, text='inner') #py 2.7

but if you prefer to use the first one -

    tki.LabelFrame.__init__(self, master=parent, text='inner')

make sure you remove the self and make it -

    tki.LabelFrame.__init__(master=parent, text='inner')
  • I've editted the question to show the results of that test, I must be doing something else wrong? – Neil_UK May 20 '14 at 5:23
  • Updated my answer please check. – brainless coder May 20 '14 at 7:22
  • If I try super() without the self, it tells me that there is a missing positional argument self, at least in 3.4 anyway. Perhaps I should stop beating on the tkinter classes, which do not appear to be behaving as they should, and just use what works. – Neil_UK May 20 '14 at 18:53
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When using super in this way, you don't pass self explicitly. Just do super(App, self).__init__(master=parent, text='inner') (or super().__init__(master=parent, text='inner') for Python 3).

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