4

This question already has an answer here:

I'm coding up a responsive website (let's say one breakpoint to keep things simple), and it'll end up looking like this:

Wide screens:

=================
     HEADER 
=================

      HERO

=================
  NAV  | SEARCH
-----------------

Narrow screens:

=================
     HEADER 
=================
  NAV  | SEARCH
-----------------

      HERO

=================

As you can see, this involves more than just CSS and media queries. There is some DOM restructuring going on. Obviously this is a simplified example and it might make sense to serve completely different HTML files depending on the viewport size.

But... what if the code is 90% identical between the wide-screen and narrow-screen versions? Surely it isn't a good idea to duplicate all that code when there are just a few elements being moved around in the DOM tree.

My approach right now is:

<header>...</header>
<section class="hero">...</section>
<section class="controls">
  <nav>...</nav>
  <form class="search">...</form>
</section>

<script>
  if(viewport.width < 768){
    $('.controls').insertAfter('header');
  }
</script>

However, this solution will clutter up my files with jQuery, rewriting page elements after they have all been loaded. It's not too good for performance either.

Do you have any ideas for a better way forward?


Edit: In response to duplicate flags, yes the display:table solution would work for this specific example. So it's technically a duplicate. But the flexbox solution I accepted here is a more powerful and appropriate tool for the task.

marked as duplicate by levi, Benjamin Gruenbaum javascript May 20 '14 at 3:32

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 1
    Hate to say "throw another library at it", but IntentionJS might be of interest to you. – SteamDev May 19 '14 at 21:19
  • IntentionJS is impressive, but for the purposes of "Placement Manipualtion" (the only feature I need for this example), it doesn't look like much less markup to write. – Sam Nabi May 19 '14 at 21:48
  • Although IntentionJS looks like it could execute faster than jQuery. – Sam Nabi May 19 '14 at 21:54
5

You could go with a media query, and use the CSS flexible box model, with its ordering rules. Something like this would do the trick (including browser prefixes):

#container {
   display: -webkit-box;
   display: -webkit-flex;
   display: -ms-flexbox;
   display: flex;
    }

#div-1 {
  -webkit-box-ordinal-group: 3;
  -webkit-order: 2;
  -ms-flex-order: 2;
  order: 2;
}

#div-2 {
  -webkit-box-ordinal-group: 2;
  -webkit-order: 1;
  -ms-flex-order: 1;
  order: 1
}

Hope this helps.

  • 1
    Flexbox is designed specifically for this purpose. +1 :) – Terry May 19 '14 at 21:22
  • Aha, I forgot about this feature of flexbox. Too bad there isn't a polyfill for the new syntax yet... This may be the most correct answer though. – Sam Nabi May 19 '14 at 21:26
  • This is really interesting to think about. Is it an acceptable graceful degradation for old browsers to get the "un-optimized" DOM order? I'm leaning toward yes. – Sam Nabi May 19 '14 at 21:56
  • @SamNabi There is almost 2/3 support for modern flexbox specifications, but if you take into account partial support, you will have >82% support. IE8 and 9 bites the dust, though :/ – Terry May 20 '14 at 8:30
1

Here's an option using CSS: http://cdpn.io/Gqfad

Essentially, use a CSS table and a media query to swap table values as the viewport changes.

CSS

.header{ 
  display:table-header-group;
}
.nsWrap{
   display: table-footer-group;
}
.nav{
  width:50%;
  float: left;

}
.search{
  width:50%;
  float: right;
}
.hero{
   display: table-row-group;
}

 .tableWrap{
   display:table; 
   width:100%;
 }


@media (max-width: 767px){
  .nsWrap{
      display: table-row-group;
  }

}    

HTML

<div class="tableWrap">
  <div class="header">HEADER</div>

  <div class="nsWrap">
    <div class="nav">NAV</div>
    <div class="search">SEARCH</div>
  </div>

 <div class="hero">HERO </div> 

</div>  

http://css-tricks.com/almanac/properties/d/display/ has a summary of the different CSS table options.

Good luck with the interesting answers!

0

Use CSS!

<style>
@media screen and (min-width: 768px){
    .nav-search {
        position: absolute;
        bottom: 0px; 
    }
}
</style>

Assuming that the nav/search container has the class "nav-search". You can apply this little piece of css and use the exact same html for both small/large screens. No Javascript!

Check out this to learn about the @media logic: http://css-tricks.com/css-media-queries/.

  • What if the hero and nav-bar are variable height? How do you ensure that the absolutely positioned footer does not overlap the hero? – levi May 19 '14 at 21:18
  • 2
    Relying on absolute positioning is a fast track to layout hell. I'm actually trying this approach as well, but as @levi mentions it really gets out of control when you don't know the size of your content. – Sam Nabi May 19 '14 at 21:21
  • I made a fiddle: jsfiddle.net/c4e84/2. Essentially, give the container a padding-bottom equal to the height of the nav-search. – KJ Price May 19 '14 at 21:25

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