45

I submitted a form via jquery, but I need the ActionResult to return true or false.

this is the code which for the controller method:

    [HttpPost]
    public ActionResult SetSchedule(FormCollection collection)
    {
        try
        {
            // TODO: Add update logic here

            return true; //cannot convert bool to actionresult
        }
        catch
        {
            return false; //cannot convert bool to actionresult
        }
    }

How would I design my JQuery call to pass that form data and also check if the return value is true or false. How do I edit the code above to return true or false?

  • 7
    I LOVE the simple, boiled down example, which expunges all irrelevant code. Wish 95% of other people, including book writers, would do the same. – Nicholas Petersen Sep 18 '12 at 5:23
  • @Eclipsoft Perhaps someone with clout can discuss the idea on meta if it hasn't been covered. – MrBoJangles Jan 31 '13 at 23:18
78

You could return a json result in form of a bool or with a bool property. Something like this:

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult SetSchedule(FormCollection collection)
{
    try
    {
        // TODO: Add update logic here

        return Json(true);
    }
    catch
    {
        return Json(false);
    }
}
5

IMHO you should use JsonResult instead of ActionResult (for code maintainability).

To handle the response in Jquery side:

$.getJSON(
 '/MyDear/Action',
 { 
   MyFormParam: $('MyParamSelector').val(),
   AnotherFormParam: $('AnotherParamSelector').val(),
 },
 function(data) {
   if (data) {
     // Do this please...
   }
 });

Hope it helps : )

  • 1
    How does using a Json result instead of an ActionResult make the code more maintainable? AFAIK the type of result you use will only affect the type of the output the browser is expecting. – JoseMarmolejos Mar 25 '10 at 10:55
  • 1
    @JoseMarmolejos Hi Jose, I recommend you to return the most derived type you can in your methods, because it lets you to use the derived methods and properties of the return type without a checked down cast when required. same applies for events. By the other side due to the covariance rule, both options are the same for delegates use ; ) +1 – SDReyes Mar 25 '10 at 15:08
2

How about this:

[HttpPost]
public bool SetSchedule(FormCollection collection)
{
    try
    {
        // TODO: Add update logic here

        return true;
    }
    catch
    {
        return false;
    }
}
  • 2
    This returns the string "True", so fails a Boolean check, E.g. if (data===true) , unlike the JSON approach. – StuartQ Dec 22 '16 at 12:30

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.