12

I have an application to deal with a file and fragment it to multiple segments, then save the result into sql server database. There are many duplicated file (maybe with different file path), so first I go through all these files and compute the Md5 hash for each file, and mark duplicated file by using the [Duplicated] column.

Then everyday, I'll run this application and save the results into the [Result] table. The db schema is as below:

    CREATE TABLE [dbo].[FilePath]
    (
        [FilePath] NVARCHAR(256) NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY,
        [FileMd5Hash] binay(16) NOT NULL,
        [Duplicated] BIT NOT NULL DEFAULT 0, 
        [LastRunBuild] NVARCHAR(30) NOT NULL DEFAULT 0
    )

    CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Result]
    (
        [Build] NVARCHAR(30) NOT NULL,
        [FileMd5Hash] binay(16) NOT NULL , 
        [SegmentId] INT NOT NULL,
        [SegmentContent] text NOT NULL 
        PRIMARY KEY ([FileMd5Hash], [Build], [SegmentId])
    )

And I have a requirement to join these 2 table on FileMd5Hash.

Since the number of rows of [Result] is very large, I'd like to add an int Identity column to join these to tables as below:

    CREATE TABLE [dbo].[FilePath]
    (
        [FilePath] NVARCHAR(256) NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY,
        [FileMd5Hash] binay(16) NOT NULL,
        **[Id] INT NOT NULL IDENTITY,**
        [Duplicated] BIT NOT NULL DEFAULT 0, 
        [LastRunBuild] NVARCHAR(30) NOT NULL DEFAULT 0
    )

    CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Result]
    (
        [Build] NVARCHAR(30) NOT NULL,
        **[Id] INT NOT NULL,**  
        [SegmentId] INT NOT NULL,
        [SegmentContent] text NOT NULL 
        PRIMARY KEY ([FileMd5Hash], [Build], [SegmentId])
    )

So What's the Pros and cons of these 2 ways?

  • 2
    Please note that MD5 algorithm can produce duplicate values for completely different data. Check wikipedia, it has more details. I think using int id is better, as it will be indexed more efficiently – cha May 20 '14 at 4:22
  • Not enough information here to understand what you are trying to do and why you might need an identity column. – usr Jun 22 '14 at 15:35
13

An int key is simpler to implement and easier to use and understand. It's also smaller (4 bytes vs 16 bytes), so indexes will fit about double the number of entries per IO page, meaning better performance. The table rows too will be smaller (OK, not much smaller), so again you'll fit more rows per page = less IO.

Hash can always produce collisions. Although exceedingly rare, nevertheless, as the birthday problem shows, collisions become more and more likely as record count increases. The number of items needed for a 50% chance of a collision with various bit-length hashes is as follows:

Hash length (bits)   Item count for 50% chance of collision
                32   77000
                64   5.1 billion
               128   22 billion billion
               256   400 billion billion billion billion

There's also the issue of having to pass around non-ascii bytes - harder to debug, send over wire, etc.

Use int sequential primary keys for your tables. Everybody else does.

  • +1 just for the last phrase -) – trailmax Jun 12 '14 at 23:04
  • 1
    Calculation verified. Probability ~ 0.44 with 32 bits and 70,000 items. With 140,000, it's almost 90%. Does that mean, it's practically useless for that order of items if uniqueness is critical. – user Jun 22 '14 at 6:19
  • @usr what are you talking about? I am saying to use an int sequential (surrogate) key and not to use hashes as keys. This is a practical matter unrelated to cryptography or security. – Bohemian Jun 22 '14 at 15:46
  • This is such an awesomely pragmatic solution! Upvote this! – wle8300 Jun 15 '16 at 19:47
4

Use ints for primary keys, not hashes. Everyone warns about hash collisions, but in practice they are not a big problem; it's easy to check for collisions and re-hash. Sequential IDs can collide as well if you merge databases.

The big problem with hashes as keys is that you cannot change your data. If you try, your hash will change and all foreign keys become invalid. You have to create a “no, this is the real hash” column in your database and your old hash just becomes a big nonsequential integer.

I bet your business analyst will say “we implement WORM so our records will never change”. They will be proven wrong.

1

Here is a very nice article explaining Pros and Cons of using both:

https://web.archive.org/web/20140618031501/http://databases.aspfaq.com/database/what-should-i-choose-for-my-primary-key.html

Using MD5 hash will be like using a GUID for your primary key. Hash collisions are rare but do happen, you may want to handle it.

I will personally go with INT IDENTITY but it may differ based on your implementation.

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