76

While investigating for a little debate w.r.t. using "" + n and Integer.toString(int) to convert an integer primitive to a string I wrote this JMH microbenchmark:

@Fork(1)
@OutputTimeUnit(TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS)
@State(Scope.Benchmark)
public class IntStr {
    protected int counter;


    @GenerateMicroBenchmark
    public String integerToString() {
        return Integer.toString(this.counter++);
    }

    @GenerateMicroBenchmark
    public String stringBuilder0() {
        return new StringBuilder().append(this.counter++).toString();
    }

    @GenerateMicroBenchmark
    public String stringBuilder1() {
        return new StringBuilder().append("").append(this.counter++).toString();
    }

    @GenerateMicroBenchmark
    public String stringBuilder2() {
        return new StringBuilder().append("").append(Integer.toString(this.counter++)).toString();
    }

    @GenerateMicroBenchmark
    public String stringFormat() {
        return String.format("%d", this.counter++);
    }

    @Setup(Level.Iteration)
    public void prepareIteration() {
        this.counter = 0;
    }
}

I ran it with the default JMH options with both Java VMs that exist on my Linux machine (up-to-date Mageia 4 64-bit, Intel i7-3770 CPU, 32GB RAM). The first JVM was the one supplied with Oracle JDK 8u5 64-bit:

java version "1.8.0_05"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.8.0_05-b13)
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 25.5-b02, mixed mode)

With this JVM I got pretty much what I expected:

Benchmark                    Mode   Samples         Mean   Mean error    Units
b.IntStr.integerToString    thrpt        20    32317.048      698.703   ops/ms
b.IntStr.stringBuilder0     thrpt        20    28129.499      421.520   ops/ms
b.IntStr.stringBuilder1     thrpt        20    28106.692     1117.958   ops/ms
b.IntStr.stringBuilder2     thrpt        20    20066.939     1052.937   ops/ms
b.IntStr.stringFormat       thrpt        20     2346.452       37.422   ops/ms

I.e. using the StringBuilder class is slower due to the additional overhead of creating the StringBuilder object and appending an empty string. Using String.format(String, ...) is even slower, by an order of magnitude or so.

The distribution-provided compiler, on the other hand, is based on OpenJDK 1.7:

java version "1.7.0_55"
OpenJDK Runtime Environment (mageia-2.4.7.1.mga4-x86_64 u55-b13)
OpenJDK 64-Bit Server VM (build 24.51-b03, mixed mode)

The results here were interesting:

Benchmark                    Mode   Samples         Mean   Mean error    Units
b.IntStr.integerToString    thrpt        20    31249.306      881.125   ops/ms
b.IntStr.stringBuilder0     thrpt        20    39486.857      663.766   ops/ms
b.IntStr.stringBuilder1     thrpt        20    41072.058      484.353   ops/ms
b.IntStr.stringBuilder2     thrpt        20    20513.913      466.130   ops/ms
b.IntStr.stringFormat       thrpt        20     2068.471       44.964   ops/ms

Why does StringBuilder.append(int) appear so much faster with this JVM? Looking at the StringBuilder class source code revealed nothing particularly interesting - the method in question is almost identical to Integer#toString(int). Interestingly enough, appending the result of Integer.toString(int) (the stringBuilder2 microbenchmark) does not appear to be faster.

Is this performance discrepancy an issue with the testing harness? Or does my OpenJDK JVM contain optimizations that would affect this particular code (anti)-pattern?

EDIT:

For a more straight-forward comparison, I installed Oracle JDK 1.7u55:

java version "1.7.0_55"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.7.0_55-b13)
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 24.55-b03, mixed mode)

The results are similar to those of OpenJDK:

Benchmark                    Mode   Samples         Mean   Mean error    Units
b.IntStr.integerToString    thrpt        20    32502.493      501.928   ops/ms
b.IntStr.stringBuilder0     thrpt        20    39592.174      428.967   ops/ms
b.IntStr.stringBuilder1     thrpt        20    40978.633      544.236   ops/ms

It seems that this is a more general Java 7 vs Java 8 issue. Perhaps Java 7 had more aggressive string optimizations?

EDIT 2:

For completeness, here are the string-related VM options for both of these JVMs:

For Oracle JDK 8u5:

$ /usr/java/default/bin/java -XX:+PrintFlagsFinal 2>/dev/null | grep String
     bool OptimizeStringConcat                      = true            {C2 product}
     intx PerfMaxStringConstLength                  = 1024            {product}
     bool PrintStringTableStatistics                = false           {product}
    uintx StringTableSize                           = 60013           {product}

For OpenJDK 1.7:

$ java -XX:+PrintFlagsFinal 2>/dev/null | grep String
     bool OptimizeStringConcat                      = true            {C2 product}        
     intx PerfMaxStringConstLength                  = 1024            {product}           
     bool PrintStringTableStatistics                = false           {product}           
    uintx StringTableSize                           = 60013           {product}           
     bool UseStringCache                            = false           {product}   

The UseStringCache option was removed in Java 8 with no replacement, so I doubt that makes any difference. The rest of the options appear to have the same settings.

EDIT 3:

A side-by-side comparison of the source code of the AbstractStringBuilder, StringBuilder and Integer classes from the src.zip file of reveals nothing noteworty. Apart from a whole lot of cosmetic and documentation changes, Integer now has some support for unsigned integers and StringBuilder has been slightly refactored to share more code with StringBuffer. None of these changes seem to affect the code paths used by StringBuilder#append(int), although I may have missed something.

A comparison of the assembly code generated for IntStr#integerToString() and IntStr#stringBuilder0() is far more interesting. The basic layout of the code generated for IntStr#integerToString() was similar for both JVMs, although Oracle JDK 8u5 seemed to be more aggressive w.r.t. inlining some calls within the Integer#toString(int) code. There was a clear correspondence with the Java source code, even for someone with minimal assembly experience.

The assembly code for IntStr#stringBuilder0(), however, was radically different. The code generated by Oracle JDK 8u5 was once again directly related to the Java source code - I could easily recognise the same layout. On the contrary, the code generated by OpenJDK 7 was almost unrecognisable to the untrained eye (like mine). The new StringBuilder() call was seemingly removed, as was the creation of the array in the StringBuilder constructor. Additionaly, the disassembler plugin was not able to provide as many references to the source code as it did in JDK 8.

I assume that this is either the result of a much more aggressive optimization pass in OpenJDK 7, or more probably the result of inserting hand-written low-level code for certain StringBuilder operations. I am unsure why this optimization does not happen in my JVM 8 implementation or why the same optimizations were not implemented for Integer#toString(int) in JVM 7. I guess someone familiar with the related parts of the JRE source code would have to answer these questions...

  • Didn't you mean: new StringBuilder().append(this.counter++).toString(); and a third test with return "" + this.counter++; ? – assylias May 20 '14 at 10:19
  • 4
    @assylias: The stringBuilder method translates into exactly the same bytecode as return "" + this.counter++;. I'll see about adding a third test without appending the empty string... – thkala May 20 '14 at 10:24
  • @assylias: there you go. No real difference that I can see... – thkala May 20 '14 at 10:35
  • can you add a test for String.format("%d",n); as well – user177800 May 20 '14 at 17:19
  • 1
    @JarrodRoberson: how about this? String.format("%d",n) is about an order of magnitude slower than everything... – thkala May 20 '14 at 18:09
94

TL;DR: Side effects in append apparently break StringConcat optimizations.

Very good analysis in the original question and updates!

For completeness, below are a few missing steps:

  • See through the -XX:+PrintInlining for both 7u55 and 8u5. In 7u55, you will see something like this:

     @ 16   org.sample.IntStr::inlineSideEffect (25 bytes)   force inline by CompilerOracle
       @ 4   java.lang.StringBuilder::<init> (7 bytes)   inline (hot)
       @ 18   java.lang.StringBuilder::append (8 bytes)   already compiled into a big method
       @ 21   java.lang.StringBuilder::toString (17 bytes)   inline (hot)
    

    ...and in 8u5:

     @ 16   org.sample.IntStr::inlineSideEffect (25 bytes)   force inline by CompilerOracle
       @ 4   java.lang.StringBuilder::<init> (7 bytes)   inline (hot)
         @ 3   java.lang.AbstractStringBuilder::<init> (12 bytes)   inline (hot)
           @ 1   java.lang.Object::<init> (1 bytes)   inline (hot)
       @ 18   java.lang.StringBuilder::append (8 bytes)   inline (hot)
         @ 2   java.lang.AbstractStringBuilder::append (62 bytes)   already compiled into a big method
       @ 21   java.lang.StringBuilder::toString (17 bytes)   inline (hot)
         @ 13   java.lang.String::<init> (62 bytes)   inline (hot)
           @ 1   java.lang.Object::<init> (1 bytes)   inline (hot)
           @ 55   java.util.Arrays::copyOfRange (63 bytes)   inline (hot)
             @ 54   java.lang.Math::min (11 bytes)   (intrinsic)
             @ 57   java.lang.System::arraycopy (0 bytes)   (intrinsic)
    

    You might notice that 7u55 version is shallower, and it looks like nothing is called after StringBuilder methods -- this is a good indication the string optimizations are in effect. Indeed, if you run 7u55 with -XX:-OptimizeStringConcat, the subcalls will reappear, and performance drops to 8u5 levels.

  • OK, so we need to figure out why 8u5 does not do the same optimization. Grep http://hg.openjdk.java.net/jdk9/jdk9/hotspot for "StringBuilder" to figure out where VM handles the StringConcat optimization; this will get you into src/share/vm/opto/stringopts.cpp

  • hg log src/share/vm/opto/stringopts.cpp to figure out the latest changes there. One of the candidates would be:

    changeset:   5493:90abdd727e64
    user:        iveresov
    date:        Wed Oct 16 11:13:15 2013 -0700
    summary:     8009303: Tiered: incorrect results in VM tests stringconcat...
    
  • Look for the review threads on OpenJDK mailing lists (easy enough to google for changeset summary): http://mail.openjdk.java.net/pipermail/hotspot-compiler-dev/2013-October/012084.html

  • Spot "String concat optimization optimization collapses the pattern [...] into a single allocation of a string and forming the result directly. All possible deopts that may happen in the optimized code restart this pattern from the beginning (starting from the StringBuffer allocation). That means that the whole pattern must me side-effect free." Eureka?

  • Write out the contrasting benchmark:

    @Fork(5)
    @Warmup(iterations = 5)
    @Measurement(iterations = 5)
    @BenchmarkMode(Mode.AverageTime)
    @OutputTimeUnit(TimeUnit.NANOSECONDS)
    @State(Scope.Benchmark)
    public class IntStr {
        private int counter;
    
        @GenerateMicroBenchmark
        public String inlineSideEffect() {
            return new StringBuilder().append(counter++).toString();
        }
    
        @GenerateMicroBenchmark
        public String spliceSideEffect() {
            int cnt = counter++;
            return new StringBuilder().append(cnt).toString();
        }
    }
    
  • Measure it on JDK 7u55, seeing the same performance for inlined/spliced side effects:

    Benchmark                       Mode   Samples         Mean   Mean error    Units
    o.s.IntStr.inlineSideEffect     avgt        25       65.460        1.747    ns/op
    o.s.IntStr.spliceSideEffect     avgt        25       64.414        1.323    ns/op
    
  • Measure it on JDK 8u5, seeing the performance degradation with the inlined effect:

    Benchmark                       Mode   Samples         Mean   Mean error    Units
    o.s.IntStr.inlineSideEffect     avgt        25       84.953        2.274    ns/op
    o.s.IntStr.spliceSideEffect     avgt        25       65.386        1.194    ns/op
    
  • Submit the bug report (https://bugs.openjdk.java.net/browse/JDK-8043677) to discuss this behavior with VM guys. The rationale for original fix is rock solid, it is interesting however if we can/should get back this optimization in some trivial cases like these.

  • ???

  • PROFIT.

And yeah, I should post the results for the benchmark which moves the increment from the StringBuilder chain, doing it before the entire chain. Also, switched to average time, and ns/op. This is JDK 7u55:

Benchmark                      Mode   Samples         Mean   Mean error    Units
o.s.IntStr.integerToString     avgt        25      153.805        1.093    ns/op
o.s.IntStr.stringBuilder0      avgt        25      128.284        6.797    ns/op
o.s.IntStr.stringBuilder1      avgt        25      131.524        3.116    ns/op
o.s.IntStr.stringBuilder2      avgt        25      254.384        9.204    ns/op
o.s.IntStr.stringFormat        avgt        25     2302.501      103.032    ns/op

And this is 8u5:

Benchmark                      Mode   Samples         Mean   Mean error    Units
o.s.IntStr.integerToString     avgt        25      153.032        3.295    ns/op
o.s.IntStr.stringBuilder0      avgt        25      127.796        1.158    ns/op
o.s.IntStr.stringBuilder1      avgt        25      131.585        1.137    ns/op
o.s.IntStr.stringBuilder2      avgt        25      250.980        2.773    ns/op
o.s.IntStr.stringFormat        avgt        25     2123.706       25.105    ns/op

stringFormat is actually a bit faster in 8u5, and all other tests are the same. This solidifies the hypothesis the side-effect breakage in SB chains in the major culprit in the original question.

  • 1
    Very nicely done! This is one subtle little bi... err... issue - not quite what most Java programmers are used to expect. I had found a couple of references w.r.t. string optimizations having correctness issues, so I had my suspicions, but I did not have the time to pin it down. I also appreciate the bug report, even if it gets nowhere. – thkala May 21 '14 at 21:25
  • 1
    Oh, I also confirmed your findings by moving the counter increment before the StringBuilder calls and benchmarking. I wonder what other little gems of this type there may be... – thkala May 21 '14 at 21:26
5

I think this has to do with the CompileThreshold flag which controls when the byte code is compiled into machine code by JIT.

The Oracle JDK has a default count of 10,000 as document at http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/tech/vmoptions-jsp-140102.html.

Where OpenJDK I couldn't find a latest document on this flag; but some mail threads suggest a much lower threshold: http://mail.openjdk.java.net/pipermail/hotspot-compiler-dev/2010-November/004239.html

Also, try turn on / off the Oracle JDK flags like -XX:+UseCompressedStrings and -XX:+OptimizeStringConcat. I am not sure if those flags are turned on by default on OpenJDK though. Could someone please suggest.

One experiement you can do, is to firstly run the program by a lot of times, say, 30,000 loops, do a System.gc() and then try to look at the performance. I believe they would yield the same.

And I assume your GC setting is the same too. Otherwise you are allocating a lot of objects and the GC might well be the major part of your run time.

  • 6
    JMH performs 20 warm-up iterations by default, each of which contains several million calls for the microbenchmark methods in this case. Theoretically CompileThreshold should not have much of an effect... – thkala May 20 '14 at 10:39
  • @thkala I am wondering what's the result if the OP try with warm-up here. But I agree with you that his code is too simple for a large room of improvement. Also that some JDK substitutes the common core performance code i.e. those with string operations by native code. Not very sure about the implementation for OpenJDK though. – Alex Suo May 20 '14 at 10:44
  • Sorry just realized you are the OP :) – Alex Suo May 20 '14 at 10:44
  • It seems that this is more of a Java7/Java8 issue than a OpenJDK/HotSpot one - I added a benchmark on Oracle JDK 7u55... – thkala May 20 '14 at 10:57
  • 4
    @AlexSuo jmh already does most of what you propose. – assylias May 20 '14 at 11:49

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