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Is it possible to check (in C++), if types are castable (implicitly or explicitly)? Is there something in the std or is it possible write a function like in C# (C# same Question)?

I want to perform this check on types not the instances of the type.

I'm not sure about the type system in C++. Is there something like the Type class in C# or Java? typeid(int) was the nearest I found. Can I store a type to a variable? Closer reading tips will be appreciated.

At example:

bool isCastable(false);
bool withoutLoss(true);
isCastable = isCastableFromTo(typeid(int), typeid(__int64), withoutLoss); //true
isCastable = isCastableFromTo(typeid(int), typeid(short), withoutLoss); //false
isCastable = isCastableFromTo(typeid(int), typeid(double), withoutLoss); //true
isCastable = isCastableFromTo(typeid(double), typeid(int), withoutLoss); //false
isCastable = isCastableFromTo(typeid(string), typeid(int), withoutLoss); //false

withoutLoss = false;
isCastable = isCastableFromTo(typeid(int), typeid(__int64), withoutLoss); //true
isCastable = isCastableFromTo(typeid(int), typeid(short), withoutLoss); //true
isCastable = isCastableFromTo(typeid(int), typeid(double), withoutLoss); //true
isCastable = isCastableFromTo(typeid(double), typeid(int), withoutLoss); //true
isCastable = isCastableFromTo(typeid(string), typeid(int), withoutLoss); //false
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  • 4
    In C++ look at <type_traits> header (cplusplus.com/reference/type_traits). You probably find std::is_convertible type trait useful. May 20, 2014 at 14:24
  • 2
    This reeks of misuse of the C++ type system. Generally, casting is a code smell.
    – Rob K
    May 20, 2014 at 15:04
  • 3
    <type_traits> is the way to go. If you don’t want to use C++11 (why?!?!), re-implement this header by looking at standard library implementations. This will involve quite a bit of mindless copying and pasting, which is why you should really use the C++11 version. May 21, 2014 at 10:34
  • 2
    @GiCo: There is nothing wrong with C++11. Your code will not explode and the most common features are supported well enough for all major compilers.
    – Danvil
    May 21, 2014 at 10:47
  • 2
    @GiCo, you could be part of the movement to push users to C++11 :)
    – Moo-Juice
    May 21, 2014 at 10:52

2 Answers 2

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In C++11 you can use std::is_convertible (reference). This checks if an implicit conversion is possible. It does not consider if the conversion would be lossy.


Example:

#include <type_traits>
bool f_to_i = std::is_convertible<float,int>::value; // true
bool i64_to_i = std::is_convertible<int64_t,int>::value; // true
bool str_to_i = std::is_convertible<std::string,int>::value; // false
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This way:

template <class F, class T, class = T>
struct is_static_castable : std::false_type
{};

template <class F, class T>
struct is_static_castable<F, T, decltype(static_cast<T>(std::declval<F>()))> : std::true_type
{};
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  • 1
    OP has explicitly restricted himself to C++03, see the comments under the question. Granted, the tag was missing (I just added it).
    – Quentin
    Apr 4, 2017 at 11:28
  • 1
    Note that this will not work in all cases (e.g. from float to const int will be false). See Wandbox.
    – Matthias
    May 2, 2018 at 18:31
  • 1
    This is great to check whether a pointer F* can be assigned to a pointer T*.
    – Jonathan H
    Jul 9, 2018 at 9:42

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