15

I'm using SimpleXML to parse an XML feed of property listings from different realtors. The relevant section of the XML feed looks something like this:

<branch name="Trustee Realtors">
    <properties>
        <property>
            <reference>1</reference>
            <price>275000</price>
            <bedrooms>3</bedrooms>
        </property>
        <property>
            <reference>2</reference>
            <price>350000</price>
            <bedrooms>4</bedrooms>
        </property>
        <property>
            <reference>3</reference>
            <price>128500</price>
            <bedrooms>4</bedrooms>
        </property>
    </properties>
</branch>
<branch name="Quick-E-Realty Inc">
    <properties>
        <property>
            <reference>4</reference>
            <price>180995</price>
            <bedrooms>3</bedrooms>
        </property>
    </properties>
</branch>

and is then converted to an array like this:

$xml = file_get_contents($filename);
$xml = simplexml_load_string($xml);
$xml_array = json_decode(json_encode((array) $xml), 1);
$xml_array = array($xml->getName() => $xml_array);

The issue I'm having is that when the array is created the data for the single listing is in a different position in the array to the multiple listings - I'm not sure exactly how to explain this, but if I var_dump() the array for the multiple items it looks like this:

array(3) {
    [0]=>
    array(3) {
        ["reference"]=>
        string(4) "0001"
        ["price"]=>
        string(6) "275000"
        ["bedrooms"]=>
        int(3)
    }
    [1]=>
    array(3) {
        ["reference"]=>
        string(4) "0002"
        ["price"]=>
        string(6) "350000"
        ["bedrooms"]=>
        int(4)
    }
    [2]=>
    array(3) {
    ["reference"]=>
        string(4) "0003"
        ["price"]=>
        string(6) "128500"
        ["bedrooms"]=>
        int(2)
    }
}

If I var_dump() the array for the single listing it looks like this:

array(3) {
    ["reference"]=>
    string(4) "0004"
    ["price"]=>
    string(6) "180995"
    ["bedrooms"]=>
    int(3)
}

But what I need it to look like is this:

array(1) {
    [0]=>
    array(3) {
        ["reference"]=>
        string(4) "0004"
        ["price"]=>
        string(6) "180995"
        ["bedrooms"]=>
        int(3)
    }
}

Each of these arrays represents the property listings from a single realtor. I'm not sure whether this is just the way that SimpleXML or the json functions work but what I need is for the same format to be used (the array containing the property listing to be the value of the [0] key).

Thanks in advance!

9
  • I don't see how your <reference>1</reference> could become 0001 with this code. json/xml will not mangle text nodes like that.
    – Marc B
    Commented May 20, 2014 at 17:19
  • My point was that each "property" is child number x of "properties" and therefore this rule isn't being applied correctly - for the single listings it should be possible to access the property listing details like this $properties['0']['reference'] but instead it has to be accessed as $properties['reference']. This completely messes up my code because I can't count how many listings there are or parse the data correctly. The distinction is that for multiple properties a list is being saved because there is more than one child, but this isn't the case where single properties are concerned. Commented May 20, 2014 at 17:31
  • In your expected output, the array key of [0] does it need to be [0] or does it need to be a specific value related to the listing? Commented May 20, 2014 at 17:33
  • The array key IDs are auto-generated - I don't need to know what these IDs are as I'm using foreach() but that doesn't work with the single listings because what it's doing is looping through the attributes instead - if I use count() to find the number of items in the array they will both return 3, but for single listings what it's actually counting are the "reference", "price" and "bedrooms" items and not the number of properties. Commented May 20, 2014 at 17:42
  • 1
    @NoelWhitemore Damn, I'm late again. I posted an answer that I though might help you out with what you were after. Commented May 20, 2014 at 19:05

8 Answers 8

6

The big massive "think outside the box" question to ask yourself here is: why are you converting the SimpleXML object to an array in the first place?

SimpleXML is not just a library for parsing XML and then using something else to manipulate it, it's designed for exactly the kind of thing you're about to do with that array.

In fact, this problem of sometimes having single elements and sometimes multiple is one of the big advantages it has over a plain array representation: for nodes that you know will be single, you can leave off the [0]; but for nodes you know might be multiple, you can use [0], or a foreach loop, and that will work too.

Here are some examples of why SimpleXML lives up to its name with your XML:

$sxml = simplexml_load_string($xml);

// Looping over multiple nodes with the same name
// We could also use $sxml->children() to loop regardless of name
//   or even the shorthand foreach ( $sxml as $children )
foreach ( $sxml->branch as $branch ) {

    // Access an attribute using array index notation
    //   the (string) is optional here, but good habit to avoid
    //   passing around SimpleXML objects by mistake
    echo 'The branch name is: ' . (string)$branch['name'] . "\n";

    // We know there is only one <properties> node, so we can take a shortcut:
    //   $branch->properties means the same as $branch->properties[0]
    // We don't know if there are 1 or many <property> nodes, but it
    //   doesn't matter: we're asking to loop over them, so SimpleXML 
    //   knows what we mean
    foreach ( $branch->properties->property as $property ) {
        echo 'The property reference is ' . (string)$property->reference . "\n";
    }
}

Basically, whenever I see that ugly json_decode(json_encode( trick, I cringe a little, because 99 times out of 100 the code that follows is much uglier than just using SimpleXML.

7
  • 3
    Why are you converting the SimpleXML object to an array in the first place? - A very good point I didn't think about. I hit a very similar issue to OP, removed the conversion to array (which, as you said, was totally unnecessary) and got exactly what I was expecting.
    – dKen
    Commented Nov 26, 2014 at 10:46
  • 1
    Answer to "why don't you prefer to use domain-specific functions to work with this data?" is "because my api's downstream users aren't expecting that". Commented Jun 23, 2015 at 18:21
  • @FullDecent Surely your API's downstream users are expecting a structure which you have defined and described to them, not one which is dynamically generated based on a lossy translation of upstream XML data?
    – IMSoP
    Commented Jun 25, 2015 at 18:17
  • @IMSoP Not necessary, this is why we have XML schema validation Commented Jun 25, 2015 at 22:20
  • 1
    Thanks for this advice. I omit conversion to array, rewrite code to use SimpleXML objects instead of arrays and code is still very simple, no complexity added. And the issue with one child element is solved. Commented Jan 9, 2018 at 14:19
5

SimpleXML is quirky like this. I used it recently trying to make configuration files "easier" to write up and found out in the process that SimpleXML doesn't always act consistent. In this case I think you will benefit from simply detecting if a <property> is the only one in a set, and if so, then wrap it in an array by itself and then send it to your loop.

NOTE: ['root'] is there because I needed to wrap a '<root></root>' element around your XML to make my test work.

//Rebuild the properties listings
$rebuild = array();
foreach($xml_array['root']['branch'] as $key => $branch) {
    $branchName = $branch['@attributes']['name'];
    //Check to see if 'properties' is only one, if it
    //is then wrap it in an array of its own.
    if(is_array($branch['properties']['property']) && !isset($branch['properties']['property'][0])) {
        //Only one propery found, wrap it in an array
        $rebuild[$branchName] = array($branch['properties']['property']);
    } else {
        //Multiple properties found
        $rebuild[$branchName] = $branch['properties']['property'];
    }
}

That takes care of rebuilding your properties. It feels a little hackish. But basically you are detecting for the lack of a multi-dimensional array here:

if(is_array($branch['properties']['property']) && !isset($branch['properties']['property'][0]))

If you don't find a multi-dimensional array then you explicitly make one of the single <property>. Then to test that everything was rebuilt correctly you can use this code:

//Now do your operation...whatever it is.
foreach($rebuild as $branch => $properties) {
    print("Listings for $branch:\n");
    foreach($properties as $property) {
        print("Reference of " . $property['reference'] . " sells at $" . $property['price'] . " for " . $property['bedrooms'] . " bedrooms.\n");
    }
    print("\n");
}

This produces the following output:

Listings for Trustee Realtors:
Reference of 1 sells at $275000 for 3 bedrooms.
Reference of 2 sells at $350000 for 4 bedrooms.
Reference of 3 sells at $128500 for 4 bedrooms.

Listings for Quick-E-Realty Inc:
Reference of 4 sells at $180995 for 3 bedrooms.

And a dump of the rebuild will produce:

Array
(
    [Trustee Realtors] => Array
        (
            [0] => Array
                (
                    [reference] => 1
                    [price] => 275000
                    [bedrooms] => 3
                )

            [1] => Array
                (
                    [reference] => 2
                    [price] => 350000
                    [bedrooms] => 4
                )

            [2] => Array
                (
                    [reference] => 3
                    [price] => 128500
                    [bedrooms] => 4
                )

        )

    [Quick-E-Realty Inc] => Array
        (
            [0] => Array
                (
                    [reference] => 4
                    [price] => 180995
                    [bedrooms] => 3
                )

        )

)

I hope that helps you out getting closer to a solution to your problem.

2
  • 1
    The "quirky" behaviour here is introduced only if you use SimpleXML in ways it wasn't intended (e.g. the json_decode(json_encode( trick). If you just leave it as an object, and try using a foreach, or referencing ->property[0], you'll find it manages to work consistently both ways at once.
    – IMSoP
    Commented May 20, 2014 at 20:58
  • @IMSoP your comment saved my time. I've been looking for the right and short answer for a long time for this problem. We are check print_r output. This is hidden an array. Can't showing print_r but foreach is always real result looping. Json encode and decode breaks the normal loop. Thank you soo much ! Commented Feb 16, 2022 at 19:54
3

One possibility is reading the XML with DOM+XPath. XML can not just be converted to JSON, but building a specific JSON for a specific XML is easy:

$dom = new DOMDocument();
$dom->loadXml($xml);
$xpath = new DOMXPath($dom);

$result = [];
foreach ($xpath->evaluate('//branch') as $branchNode) {
  $properties = [];
  foreach ($xpath->evaluate('properties/property', $branchNode) as $propertyNode) {
    $properties[] = [
      'reference' => $xpath->evaluate('string(reference)', $propertyNode),
      'price' => (int)$xpath->evaluate('string(price)', $propertyNode),
      'bedrooms' => (int)$xpath->evaluate('string(bedrooms)', $propertyNode)
    ];
  }
  $result[] = [
    'name' => $xpath->evaluate('string(@name)', $branchNode),
    'properties' => $properties
  ];
}

echo json_encode($result, JSON_PRETTY_PRINT);

Output: https://eval.in/154352

[
    {
        "name": "Trustee Realtors",
        "properties": [
            {
                "reference": "1",
                "price": 275000,
                "bedrooms": 3
            },
            {
                "reference": "2",
                "price": 350000,
                "bedrooms": 4
            },
            {
                "reference": "3",
                "price": 128500,
                "bedrooms": 4
            }
        ]
    },
    {
        "name": "Quick-E-Realty Inc",
        "properties": [
            {
                "reference": "4",
                "price": 180995,
                "bedrooms": 3
            }
        ]
    }
1
  • 1
    Here's the same code converted line-by-line to use SimpleXML: eval.in/154383 It's a good deal... simpler.
    – IMSoP
    Commented May 20, 2014 at 21:09
1

Use the SimpleXMLElement Class:

 <?php
 $xml = "<body>
 <item>
 <id>2</id>
 </item>
 </body>";
$elem  =  new SimpleXMLElement($xml);
 if($elem->children()->count() === 1){
    $id = $elem->item->addChild(0)->addChild('id',$elem->item->id);
    unset($elem->item->id);
 };

$array =  json_decode(json_encode($elem), true);
print_r($array);

Output:

  Array
  (
    [item] => Array
    (
        [0] => Array
            (
                [id] => 2
            )

    )

  )
1
  • I think this solution is better in '2019
    – maverabil
    Commented Feb 6, 2019 at 10:22
0

did you use this:

$xml_array['branch']['properties']['property']

as loop source? try to use this:

$xml_array['branch']['properties']

don't use ['property'] at the end of the line, don't use 3 segment just use 2 segment

<?php
$xml = file_get_contents('simple.xml');
$xml = simplexml_load_string($xml);
$xml_array = json_decode(json_encode((array) $xml), 1);
$xml_array = array($xml->getName() => $xml_array);
print_r($xml_array);
foreach($xml_array['branch']['properties'] as $a){
    print_r($a);
}
?>
1
  • Thanks - that doesn't solve the problem though because the array positions are still wrong. Inside the foreach() loop the key that gets returned will either be the index of the property in the list (for multiple listings) or the property attributes (for single listings). So for multiple properties I can get the property price like this $properties['0']['price'] but for the single listings I would have to do this $properties['price'] so it doesn't matter which parts of the array I loop through, the wrong values will still be returned. Commented May 20, 2014 at 18:17
0

In order to solve this problem, you should select using xpath (as other mention), but in my opinion this is not a very familiar tool to most web-developers. I created a very small composer enabled package, which solves this problem. Credit to the symfony package CssSelector (https://symfony.com/doc/current/components/css_selector.html) which rewrites CSS selectors to xpath selectors. My package is just a thin wrapper that actually deals with what you in the most common cases will do with XML using PHP. You can find it here: https://github.com/diversen/simple-query-selector

use diversen\querySelector;

// Load simple XML document
$xml = simplexml_load_file('test2.xml');


// Get all branches as DOM elements 
$elems = querySelector::getElementsAsDOM($xml, 'branch');

foreach($elems as $elem) {
    // Get attribute name
    echo $elem->attributes()->name . "\n";
    // Get properties as array
    $props = querySelector::getElementsAsAry($elem, 'property');
    print_r($props); // You will get the array structure you expect
}

You could also (if you don't care about the branch name) just do:

$elems = querySelector::getElementsAsAry($xml, 'property');
0

Testing if the parsed XML has multiple tags, or is a single tag converted to array, instead of rebuilding the array, you could just test for the following case:

<?php    

if (is_array($info[0])) {
    foreach ($info as $fields) {
        // Do something...
    } 
} else {
   // Do something else...
}
0

Try it=)

$xml = simplexml_load_string($xml_raw, "SimpleXMLElement", LIBXML_NOCDATA);
$json = json_encode($xml);
$array = json_decode($json, TRUE);
$marray['RepairSheets']['RepairSheet'][0] = $array['RepairSheets']['RepairSheet'];
$array = (isset($array['RepairSheets']['RepairSheet'][0]) == true) ? $array : $marray;
1
  • Welcome Bro. please provide descriptive answers and not code only answers, in order to every user understand what you have done.
    – Abilogos
    Commented Jan 13, 2021 at 9:20

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