7

When I combine random integer generation with CHOOSE() I am getting unexpected NULL values.

The following should only return letters a-e, instead NULL is also included in the values:

Query:

;WITH cte AS (SELECT 1 RN
              UNION  ALL 
              SELECT RN + 1 
              FROM cte
              WHERE RN < 100)
SELECT DISTINCT CHOOSE(1 + ABS(CRYPT_GEN_RANDOM(8)%5),'a','b','c','d','e','f')
FROM cte

Results:

NULL
a
b
c
d
e

Expected Results:

a
b
c
d
e

The random number generation works as expected, returning only values 1-5:

;WITH cte AS (SELECT 1 RN
              UNION  ALL 
              SELECT RN + 1 
              FROM cte
              WHERE RN < 50)
SELECT 1 + ABS(CRYPT_GEN_RANDOM(8)%5)
FROM cte

Demo: SQL Fiddle

CHOOSE() works as follows (index starts at 1):

SELECT CHOOSE(3,'dog','cat','horse','fish')  
-- horse
SELECT CHOOSE(8,'dog','cat','horse','fish')  
-- NULL

Using random number generation in functions works fine for LEFT(),RIGHT(),CHAR(),etc. A workaround would be fine, but mostly I'm curious as to why I get NULL values at all.

8
  • Interestingly, if you move DISTINCT 1 + ABS(CRYPT_GEN_RANDOM(8)%5) to a subquery and use the column from that subquery in CHOOSE, you don't get nulls.
    – GSerg
    May 20 '14 at 20:24
  • @GSerg I noticed that too, sadly it's not a great workaround for my purposes as I'm using multiple CRYPT_GEN_RANDOM() in my SELECT, which each generate a random number. Ie: SELECT 1 + ABS(CRYPT_GEN_RANDOM(8)%5), 1 + ABS(CRYPT_GEN_RANDOM(8)%5), 1 + ABS(CRYPT_GEN_RANDOM(8)%5) I could call a number of these in my cte as different columns, but it's not ideal.
    – Hart CO
    May 20 '14 at 20:33
  • @GoatCO you need to choose between "ideal" and "as intended." This is the way SQL Server works; you need to work around it, whether SQL Server's design is ideal for you or not. As an aside, I marked this as a duplicate, since CHOOSE() expands to a CASE expression, and thus behaves exactly as Paul described in the duplicate. More in my comments below. May 20 '14 at 20:34
  • @AaronBertrand Agreed, knowing that it's by design makes working around it obvious regardless of convenience. Regarding it being marked as a duplicate, while the linked answer certainly helps, it only helps if it's also understood that CHOOSE() and CASE are handled exactly the same way on the backend.
    – Hart CO
    May 20 '14 at 20:53
  • 1
    No, they don't, or at least they shouldn't be - duplicates are google juice. Background May 20 '14 at 20:59
1

This is weird, probably in the category of a bug. Of course, what you are doing is strange, because you are treating a random pattern of bits as a number. Should be valid, but there could be unintended consequences. And, this is not an overflow problem. It occurs with other values of 8.

Witness the following (on SQL Fiddle):

WITH cte AS (SELECT 1 RN
              UNION  ALL 
              SELECT RN + 1 
              FROM cte
              WHERE RN < 100)
SELECT  CHOOSE(1 + ABS(n),'a','b','c','d','e','f'),
        CHOOSE(1 + abs(CRYPT_GEN_RANDOM(8)%5),'a','b','c','d','e','f')
FROM (select abs(CRYPT_GEN_RANDOM(8)%5) as n
      from cte
     ) n
order by 1

The first column is never NULL. The second column is periodically NULL. In other words, it makes a difference if you assign the value to another variable. I could imagine that some pattern of 8-byte big integers represents NaN, but not that this happens so much.

Given that it fails with a direct call but works when there is an intermediate variable, I'm led to the conclusion that this might be some sort of bug. I wonder if it is documented somewhere.

8
  • 9
    Not a bug. CHOOSE expands to a CASE expression, and within the CASE expression, CRYPT_GEN_RANDOM is re-evaluated for each potential output. There are obviously times when the first evaluation yields 2, and the next 5 yield 1, pushing you to ELSE territory. Paul demonstrates this with CHECKSUM(NEWID()) here, but the concept is the same. May 20 '14 at 20:31
  • 1
    Nope, it evaluates it every time, it is not case arg1 when 1 then val1 when 2 then val2 it is case when arg1 = 1 then val1 when arg1 = 2 then val2. May 20 '14 at 20:33
  • 3
    And arg1 is a different evaluation of the function in every case
    – Lamak
    May 20 '14 at 20:35
  • 3
    I don't think "the implementation is intentionally broken." I think a design decision was made, years ago, and you just don't like the decision. :-) CHOOSE() doesn't offer any new functionality, moreover neither does COALESCE(). They both just piggyback on existing CASE expression behavior. May 20 '14 at 20:37
  • 2
    @AaronBertrand . . . These two functions introduce unnecessary problems. I guess ANSI doesn't have anything to say about multiple evaluations in coalesce(), but it seems odd to have such behavior when isnull() works as expected (but just on two arguments). By the way, I for one have missed you around here. May 20 '14 at 22:20

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