26

I am trying to find why the class cant be created as a static? Like:

public static class Qwert{

    public static void main(String args[]){

        int x = 12;
        while(x<12){
            x--;
        }
        System.out.println(" the X value is : "+ x);
    }
}
62

In Java, the static keyword typically flags a method or field as existing not once per instance of a class, but once ever. A class exists once anyway so in effect, all classes are "static" in this way and all objects are instances of classes.

static does have a meaning for inner classes, which is entirely different: Usually an inner class instance can access the members of an outer class instance that it's tied to, but if the inner class is static, it does not have such a reference and can be instantiated without an instance of the outer class. Maybe you saw that someplace, then tried to use it on a top-level class, where it isn't meaningful.

Or maybe you saw it in other languages like C#, whose syntax is an awful lot like Java's.

(One time I couldn't figure out why an outer class instance wasn't being garbage-collected -- it was because I was keeping a reference to one of its inner class instances elsewhere, and the inner class was not static and so had a reference to the outer class instance. So by default, I make inner classes static now.)

8
  • 3
    Pretty much spot-on. An inner class is by default not static, which is to say that each instance of a class that has a nested class gets its own copy of the nested class. This is how you can reference "this" in the class, and why you can't declare static methods or fields, doesn't make any sense, since each instance of the outer class has its own copy. A "static" nested class (by definition a true "inner" class) means there is only one copy of that class, which is much more like a regular class. I always thought that the semantics of these nested classes were hopelessly convoluted. Mar 4 '10 at 4:55
  • Also I bent the truth about non-static methods existing once per instance, they actually don't from a memory standpoint. I was just making a conceptual point.
    – easeout
    Mar 4 '10 at 5:09
  • @jeff, what is the difference between a statically declared inner class and a non static one in terms of object instantiation from that class? is there some sort of, you can only instantiate a single object from a static inner class, and can instantiate more than one object from a non-static inner class? is that it?
    – ultrajohn
    Mar 4 '10 at 5:11
  • For variables, it's not "once ever", but once per Class. Since a Class can loaded multiple by different class loaders, it's statics can exists multiple, though in separate namespaces. Mar 4 '10 at 5:16
  • @ultrajohn If the inner class is static, it's just a class that's declared in another class, so you can instantiate it normally. Otherwise, you have to have an outer class instance to do it, because the new instance will get to use its members. The full syntax is "outerClassInstance.new InnerClass(args)". But if "this" is an instance of the outer class, then you can just say "new InnerClass(args)", and it will associate the instance with "this".
    – easeout
    Mar 4 '10 at 5:22
8

To prevent a particular class being instantiated you should add a private Constructor. This stops 'any other' Class from being able to create an object of type Qwert.

for example:

    public static class Qwert{


        private Qwert() {}

        public static void main(String args[]){

            int x = 12;
            while(x<12){
                x--;
            }
            System.out.println(" the X value is : "+ x);
        }
    }
1
  • Good insight, that is probably what he was trying to do come to think of it.
    – easeout
    Mar 4 '10 at 5:01
2

We should define members as static which

  1. Should be common to all objects of the class.
  2. Should belong to the class and accessible by class name.
  3. Should not need an object of class to access them.

Now suppose we are defining an outer class as static and suppose we are allowed to do so. Will this serve any purpose or provide any advantage to a developer or it will create ambiguity and complications for both developers and language creators?

Let’s check, defining an outer class as static will serve purposes which we have defined above or not?

  1. Every class is already common to all of its objects and there is no need to make it static to become available to all of its objects.
  2. We need a class name to access its static members because these members are part of class while an outer class is part of package and we can directly access the class by just writing package_name.class_name (similar to class_name.static_field_name), So again there is no need to do which is already there by default.
  3. We do not need any object to access a class if it is visible, we can simply write package_name.class_name to access it. And by definition, a class is a blueprint for its objects and we create a class to create objects from it (exception will always be there e.g. java.lang.Math), again there is no need to define an outer class as static.

From above points, we can say Java creators had not allowed an outer class to be static because there is no need to make it static. Allowing to make the outer class static will only increase complications, ambiguity and duplicity. Read more on Why An Outer Java Class Can’t Be Static

1

To prevent any class from creating an instance of Qwert, either by inheritance or by using reflection, you make the constructor fail by placing a poison pill:

public class Qwert { 

    private Qwert() throws IllegalAccessException {
        throw new IllegalAccessException("Utility class!");
    }

    public static class Yuiop {
        public Yuiop() throws IllegalAccessException {
            // generates a synthetic accessor method to super()
        }
    }

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        new Yuiop();
    }
}
1

its because when we use static keyword for a component, that component becomes a class level component and its memory is taken by its class.

0

In Java, by definition, static applies to the inner components of a class. "X is static" means in Java "X is associated with the class in which it is defined, rather than with any instance of the class".

The word "static" means literally "fixed at one location in memory". Every instance of the class shares a static variable or static member. Hence the use of "class variable" as a synonym for "static variable". Which lets you see at once that you cannot define an outer class as static.

It therefore follows that your class, Qwert, cannot be created as static. Unless it is subsumed as a component of an outer class, effectively making it an inner class.

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