193

I am trying to pass array parameter to SQL commnd in C# like below, but it does not work. Does anyone meet it before?

string sqlCommand = "SELECT * from TableA WHERE Age IN (@Age)";
SqlConnection sqlCon = new SqlConnection(connectString);
SqlCommand sqlComm = new SqlCommand();
sqlComm.Connection = sqlCon;
sqlComm.CommandType = System.Data.CommandType.Text;
sqlComm.CommandText = sqlCommand;
sqlComm.CommandTimeout = 300;
sqlComm.Parameters.Add("@Age", SqlDbType.NVarChar);
StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
foreach (ListItem item in ddlAge.Items)
{
     if (item.Selected)
     {
         sb.Append(item.Text + ",");
     }
}

sqlComm.Parameters["@Age"].Value = sb.ToString().TrimEnd(',');
2
  • 14
    Not really the topic, but it seems to me like having Age as a column in a table is a bad idea, since it will need to be updated constantly. People get older right? Maybe you should consider having a column DateOfBirth instead? Mar 4, 2010 at 9:52
  • question with good answer here: stackoverflow.com/questions/83471/… Feb 17, 2012 at 5:42

11 Answers 11

223

You will need to add the values in the array one at a time.

var parameters = new string[items.Length];
var cmd = new SqlCommand();
for (int i = 0; i < items.Length; i++)
{
    parameters[i] = string.Format("@Age{0}", i);
    cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue(parameters[i], items[i]);
}

cmd.CommandText = string.Format("SELECT * from TableA WHERE Age IN ({0})", string.Join(", ", parameters));
cmd.Connection = new SqlConnection(connStr);

UPDATE: Here is an extended and reusable solution that uses Adam's answer along with his suggested edit. I improved it a bit and made it an extension method to make it even easier to call.

public static class SqlCommandExt
{

    /// <summary>
    /// This will add an array of parameters to a SqlCommand. This is used for an IN statement.
    /// Use the returned value for the IN part of your SQL call. (i.e. SELECT * FROM table WHERE field IN ({paramNameRoot}))
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="cmd">The SqlCommand object to add parameters to.</param>
    /// <param name="paramNameRoot">What the parameter should be named followed by a unique value for each value. This value surrounded by {} in the CommandText will be replaced.</param>
    /// <param name="values">The array of strings that need to be added as parameters.</param>
    /// <param name="dbType">One of the System.Data.SqlDbType values. If null, determines type based on T.</param>
    /// <param name="size">The maximum size, in bytes, of the data within the column. The default value is inferred from the parameter value.</param>
    public static SqlParameter[] AddArrayParameters<T>(this SqlCommand cmd, string paramNameRoot, IEnumerable<T> values, SqlDbType? dbType = null, int? size = null)
    {
        /* An array cannot be simply added as a parameter to a SqlCommand so we need to loop through things and add it manually. 
         * Each item in the array will end up being it's own SqlParameter so the return value for this must be used as part of the
         * IN statement in the CommandText.
         */
        var parameters = new List<SqlParameter>();
        var parameterNames = new List<string>();
        var paramNbr = 1;
        foreach (var value in values)
        {
            var paramName = string.Format("@{0}{1}", paramNameRoot, paramNbr++);
            parameterNames.Add(paramName);
            SqlParameter p = new SqlParameter(paramName, value);
            if (dbType.HasValue)
                p.SqlDbType = dbType.Value;
            if (size.HasValue)
                p.Size = size.Value;
            cmd.Parameters.Add(p);
            parameters.Add(p);
        }

        cmd.CommandText = cmd.CommandText.Replace("{" + paramNameRoot + "}", string.Join(",", parameterNames));

        return parameters.ToArray();
    }

}

It is called like this...

var cmd = new SqlCommand("SELECT * FROM TableA WHERE Age IN ({Age})");
cmd.AddArrayParameters("Age", new int[] { 1, 2, 3 });

Notice the "{Age}" in the sql statement is the same as the parameter name we are sending to AddArrayParameters. AddArrayParameters will replace the value with the correct parameters.

14
  • 13
    Does this method have the security issue, like sql injection? Mar 4, 2010 at 8:02
  • 8
    Because you are putting the values into parameters there is no risk of sql injection.
    – Brian
    Mar 4, 2010 at 17:29
  • 1
    I like this, and only made the following modification after extracting the placeholder string to a variable: var paramPlaceholder = "{" & paramNameRoot & "}"; Debug.Assert(cmd.CommandText.Contains(paramPlaceholder), "Parameter Name Root must exist in the Source Query"); This should help devs if they forget to match paramNameRoot with the query.
    – MCattle
    Jun 20, 2016 at 18:28
  • 3
    This is wrong approach, Table-Valued parameter should be used https://stackoverflow.com/a/10409710/1565525
    – Fabio
    Aug 25, 2017 at 14:14
  • 1
    This answer is wrong because it has poor scalability and performance and it promotes bad coding practices. Mar 22, 2020 at 13:41
44

I wanted to expand on the answer that Brian contributed to make this easily usable in other places.

/// <summary>
/// This will add an array of parameters to a SqlCommand. This is used for an IN statement.
/// Use the returned value for the IN part of your SQL call. (i.e. SELECT * FROM table WHERE field IN (returnValue))
/// </summary>
/// <param name="sqlCommand">The SqlCommand object to add parameters to.</param>
/// <param name="array">The array of strings that need to be added as parameters.</param>
/// <param name="paramName">What the parameter should be named.</param>
protected string AddArrayParameters(SqlCommand sqlCommand, string[] array, string paramName)
{
    /* An array cannot be simply added as a parameter to a SqlCommand so we need to loop through things and add it manually. 
     * Each item in the array will end up being it's own SqlParameter so the return value for this must be used as part of the
     * IN statement in the CommandText.
     */
    var parameters = new string[array.Length];
    for (int i = 0; i < array.Length; i++)
    {
        parameters[i] = string.Format("@{0}{1}", paramName, i);
        sqlCommand.Parameters.AddWithValue(parameters[i], array[i]);
    }

    return string.Join(", ", parameters);
}

You can use this new function as follows:

SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand();

string ageParameters = AddArrayParameters(cmd, agesArray, "Age");
sql = string.Format("SELECT * FROM TableA WHERE Age IN ({0})", ageParameters);

cmd.CommandText = sql;


Edit: Here is a generic variation that works with an array of values of any type and is usable as an extension method:

public static class Extensions
{
    public static void AddArrayParameters<T>(this SqlCommand cmd, string name, IEnumerable<T> values) 
    { 
        name = name.StartsWith("@") ? name : "@" + name;
        var names = string.Join(", ", values.Select((value, i) => { 
            var paramName = name + i; 
            cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue(paramName, value); 
            return paramName; 
        })); 
        cmd.CommandText = cmd.CommandText.Replace(name, names); 
    }
}

You can then use this extension method as follows:

var ageList = new List<int> { 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11 };
var cmd = new SqlCommand();
cmd.CommandText = "SELECT * FROM MyTable WHERE Age IN (@Age)";    
cmd.AddArrayParameters("Age", ageList);

Make sure you set the CommandText before calling AddArrayParameters.

Also make sure your parameter name won't partially match anything else in your statement (i.e. @AgeOfChild)

5
  • 1
    Here is a generic variation that works with array of values of any type and is usable as an extension method: public static void AddArrayParameters<T>( this SqlCommand cmd, string name, IEnumerable<T> values) { var names = string.Join(", ", values.Select((value, i) => { var paramName = name + i; cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue(paramName, value); return paramName; })); cmd.CommandText = cmd.CommandText.Replace(name, names); } Jan 13, 2014 at 15:44
  • Minor issue with this answer is with the AddWithValue function, any chance you could fix that?
    – DavidG
    Jan 3, 2018 at 1:37
  • This answer is wrong because it has poor scalability and performance and it promotes bad coding practices. Mar 22, 2020 at 13:42
  • @IgorLevicki could you explain why? Jun 22, 2023 at 15:54
  • @BorislavIvanov Because you are using String.Format in your first example to create SQL command string among other things. Also, it's much easier to just learn to use Dapper and proper database design patterns instead of rolling your own. Jun 24, 2023 at 15:07
35

If you can use a tool like "dapper", this can be simply:

int[] ages = { 20, 21, 22 }; // could be any common list-like type
var rows = connection.Query<YourType>("SELECT * from TableA WHERE Age IN @ages",
          new { ages }).ToList();

Dapper will handle unwrapping this to individual parameters for you.

3
  • 1
    Dapper pulls lots of dependencies :(
    – mlt
    Feb 19, 2020 at 1:55
  • 2
    @mlt huh? no, it doesn't; on netfx: "no dependencies"; on ns2.0, just "System.Reflection.Emit.Lightweight" - and we could probably remove that if we added a necroreapp target Feb 19, 2020 at 7:11
  • I didn't mean to hijack the discussion, but I did... Thus far I use Npgsql that handles arrays fine as in '{1,2,3}' style arguments to a function (not a WHERE IN clause), but I'd rather use plain ODBC if not array hassle. I presume I would need Dapper ODBC as well in this case. Here is what it wants to pull. snipboard.io/HU0RpJ.jpg . Perhaps I should read on more on Dapper...
    – mlt
    Feb 20, 2020 at 21:01
24

If you are using MS SQL Server 2008 and above you can use table-valued parameters like described here http://www.sommarskog.se/arrays-in-sql-2008.html.

1. Create a table type for each parameter type you will be using

The following command creates a table type for integers:

create type int32_id_list as table (id int not null primary key)

2. Implement helper methods

public static SqlCommand AddParameter<T>(this SqlCommand command, string name, IEnumerable<T> ids)
{
  var parameter = command.CreateParameter();      

  parameter.ParameterName = name;
  parameter.TypeName = typeof(T).Name.ToLowerInvariant() + "_id_list";
  parameter.SqlDbType = SqlDbType.Structured;
  parameter.Direction = ParameterDirection.Input;

  parameter.Value = CreateIdList(ids);

  command.Parameters.Add(parameter);
  return command;
}

private static DataTable CreateIdList<T>(IEnumerable<T> ids)
{
  var table = new DataTable();
  table.Columns.Add("id", typeof (T));

  foreach (var id in ids)
  {
    table.Rows.Add(id);
  }

  return table;
}

3. Use it like this

cmd.CommandText = "select * from TableA where Age in (select id from @age)"; 
cmd.AddParameter("@age", new [] {1,2,3,4,5});
2
  • 1
    The line table.Rows.Add(id); results in a minor code smell when using SonarQube. I used this alternative inside the foreach: var row = table.NewRow(); row["id"] = id; table.Rows.Add(row);.
    – pogosama
    Jul 6, 2018 at 11:26
  • 1
    Can I dynamically/temporarily create the table int32_id_list (in your example) within the CommandText? E. g. when using SqlDataAdapter(command).Fill(dataTable)? Sep 9, 2020 at 20:19
14

Since there is a method on

SqlCommand.Parameters.AddWithValue(parameterName, value)

it might be more convenient to create a method accepting a parameter (name) to replace and a list of values. It is not on the Parameters level (like AddWithValue) but on command itself so it's better to call it AddParametersWithValues and not just AddWithValues:

query:

SELECT * from TableA WHERE Age IN (@age)

usage:

sqlCommand.AddParametersWithValues("@age", 1, 2, 3);

the extension method:

public static class SqlCommandExtensions
{
    public static void AddParametersWithValues<T>(this SqlCommand cmd,  string parameterName, params T[] values)
    {
        var parameterNames = new List<string>();
        for(int i = 0; i < values.Count(); i++)
        {
            var paramName = @"@param" + i;
            cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue(paramName, values.ElementAt(i));
            parameterNames.Add(paramName);
        }

        cmd.CommandText = cmd.CommandText.Replace(parameterName, string.Join(",", parameterNames));
    }
}
1
  • it is better to use a static index for the parameter name
    – shmnff
    Jan 28, 2020 at 2:24
10

I want to propose another way, how to solve limitation with IN operator.

For example we have following query

select *
from Users U
WHERE U.ID in (@ids)

We want to pass several IDs to filter users. Unfortunately it is not possible to do with C# in easy way. But I have fount workaround for this by using "string_split" function. We need to rewrite a bit our query to following.

declare @ids nvarchar(max) = '1,2,3'

SELECT *
FROM Users as U
CROSS APPLY string_split(@ids, ',') as UIDS
WHERE U.ID = UIDS.value

Now we can easily pass one parameter enumeration of values separated by comma.

2
6

Passing an array of items as a collapsed parameter to the WHERE..IN clause will fail since query will take form of WHERE Age IN ("11, 13, 14, 16").

But you can pass your parameter as an array serialized to XML or JSON:

Using nodes() method:

StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

foreach (ListItem item in ddlAge.Items)
  if (item.Selected)
    sb.Append("<age>" + item.Text + "</age>"); // actually it's xml-ish

sqlComm.CommandText = @"SELECT * from TableA WHERE Age IN (
    SELECT Tab.col.value('.', 'int') as Age from @Ages.nodes('/age') as Tab(col))";
sqlComm.Parameters.Add("@Ages", SqlDbType.NVarChar);
sqlComm.Parameters["@Ages"].Value = sb.ToString();

Using OPENXML method:

using System.Xml.Linq;
...
XElement xml = new XElement("Ages");

foreach (ListItem item in ddlAge.Items)
  if (item.Selected)
    xml.Add(new XElement("age", item.Text);

sqlComm.CommandText = @"DECLARE @idoc int;
    EXEC sp_xml_preparedocument @idoc OUTPUT, @Ages;
    SELECT * from TableA WHERE Age IN (
    SELECT Age from OPENXML(@idoc, '/Ages/age') with (Age int 'text()')
    EXEC sp_xml_removedocument @idoc";
sqlComm.Parameters.Add("@Ages", SqlDbType.Xml);
sqlComm.Parameters["@Ages"].Value = xml.ToString();

That's a bit more on the SQL side and you need a proper XML (with root).

Using OPENJSON method (SQL Server 2016+):

using Newtonsoft.Json;
...
List<string> ages = new List<string>();

foreach (ListItem item in ddlAge.Items)
  if (item.Selected)
    ages.Add(item.Text);

sqlComm.CommandText = @"SELECT * from TableA WHERE Age IN (
    select value from OPENJSON(@Ages))";
sqlComm.Parameters.Add("@Ages", SqlDbType.NVarChar);
sqlComm.Parameters["@Ages"].Value = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(ages);

Note that for the last method you also need to have Compatibility Level at 130+.

0

Just changing DbType might be enough:

string sqlCommand = "SELECT * from TableA WHERE Age IN (@Age)";
SqlConnection sqlCon = new SqlConnection(connectString);
SqlCommand sqlComm = new SqlCommand
{
    Connection = sqlCon,
    CommandType = CommandType.Text,
    CommandText = sqlCommand,
    CommandTimeout = 300
};

var itens = string.Join(',', ddlAge.Items);
sqlComm.Parameters.Add(
    new SqlParameter("@Age", itens)
    {
        DbType = DbType.String
    });
-2

Use .AddWithValue(), So:

sqlComm.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Age", sb.ToString().TrimEnd(','));

Alternatively, you could use this:

sqlComm.Parameters.Add(
    new SqlParameter("@Age", sb.ToString().TrimEnd(',')) { SqlDbType = SqlDbType. NVarChar }
    );

Your total code sample will look at follows then:

string sqlCommand = "SELECT * from TableA WHERE Age IN (@Age)";
SqlConnection sqlCon = new SqlConnection(connectString);
SqlCommand sqlComm = new SqlCommand();
sqlComm.Connection = sqlCon;
sqlComm.CommandType = System.Data.CommandType.Text;
sqlComm.CommandText = sqlCommand;
sqlComm.CommandTimeout = 300;

StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
foreach (ListItem item in ddlAge.Items)
{
     if (item.Selected)
     {
         sb.Append(item.Text + ",");
     }
}

sqlComm.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Age", sb.ToString().TrimEnd(','));

// OR

// sqlComm.Parameters.Add(new SqlParameter("@Age", sb.ToString().TrimEnd(',')) { SqlDbType = SqlDbType. NVarChar });
5
  • The Age field's type is nvchar not int. Does it matter? Mar 4, 2010 at 7:45
  • It shouldn't. Especially with the second method. You specify the type explicitly. Mar 4, 2010 at 7:54
  • I use both method, it still doesn't work. I do not want to manipulate the string which may led security problem Mar 4, 2010 at 8:00
  • I'm not really understanding you. When you say it doesn't work, does it throw an exception? What does it do? Mar 4, 2010 at 8:01
  • 1
    it does not throw exception, it return nothing. But I run the T-SQL in Studio Management, it returns many result. Mar 4, 2010 at 8:05
-2

Overview: Use the DbType to set the parameter type.

var parameter = new SqlParameter();
parameter.ParameterName = "@UserID";
parameter.DbType = DbType.Int32;
parameter.Value = userID.ToString();

var command = conn.CreateCommand()
command.Parameters.Add(parameter);
var reader = await command.ExecuteReaderAsync()

The stored procedure can then split the incoming string into a temp table using the string_split function. The incoming string can be varchar(max) size as the limiting factor.

In the initial example the data was string was built by string builder, therefore, it is not an object. If it were an object then you would pass it as a binary object byte array .

0
-7

try it like this

StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(); 
foreach (ListItem item in ddlAge.Items) 
{ 
     if (item.Selected) 
     { 
          string sqlCommand = "SELECT * from TableA WHERE Age IN (@Age)"; 
          SqlConnection sqlCon = new SqlConnection(connectString); 
          SqlCommand sqlComm = new SqlCommand(); 
          sqlComm.Connection = sqlCon; 
          sqlComm.CommandType = System.Data.CommandType.Text; 
          sqlComm.CommandText = sqlCommand; 
          sqlComm.CommandTimeout = 300; 
          sqlComm.Parameters.Add("@Age", SqlDbType.NVarChar);
          sb.Append(item.Text + ","); 
          sqlComm.Parameters["@Age"].Value = sb.ToString().TrimEnd(',');
     } 
} 
2
  • 2
    Why put the SqlConnection and SqlCommnad in the loop? Mar 4, 2010 at 7:40
  • try sqlComm.Parameters["@Age"].Value = sb.ToString().Replace(","," ");
    – Ballin
    Mar 4, 2010 at 8:21

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