73

This is how I started to get a md5 hash from a string:

import "crypto/md5"

var original = "my string comes here"
var hash = md5.New(original)

But obviously this is not how it works. Can someone provide me a working sample for this?

1
  • The very best answer to this question is in the comments by @Alexei Danchenkov below. I've implemented them in a quick runnable example here: play.golang.org/p/e7v_erP7Gc
    – Aaron
    Jul 7 '16 at 13:02
80

Reference Sum,For me,following work well:

package main

import (
    "crypto/md5"
    "fmt"
)

func main() {
    data := []byte("hello")
    fmt.Printf("%x", md5.Sum(data))
}
76
import (
    "crypto/md5"
    "encoding/hex"
)

func GetMD5Hash(text string) string {
   hash := md5.Sum([]byte(text))
   return hex.EncodeToString(hash[:])
}
3
  • Well done! I personally like that your simple wrapping works 'transparently' in the sense that so many other programming languages do the same thing... Jun 26 '20 at 16:01
  • what is the purpose of hash[:]? Thanks
    – Matteo
    Oct 5 '20 at 3:11
  • 2
    @Madeo it means a slice which referencing the storage of (variable) hash, for the detail You can see here blog.golang.org/slices-intro
    – Sal Prima
    Oct 20 '20 at 15:32
41

I found this solution to work well

package main

import (
    "crypto/md5"
    "encoding/hex"
    "fmt"
)

func main() {
    var str string = "hello world"

    hasher := md5.New()
    hasher.Write([]byte(str))
    fmt.Println(str)
    fmt.Println(hex.EncodeToString(hasher.Sum(nil)))
}
37

From crypto/md5 doc:

package main

import (
    "crypto/md5"
    "fmt"
    "io"
)

func main() {
    h := md5.New()
    io.WriteString(h, "The fog is getting thicker!")
    fmt.Printf("%x", h.Sum(nil))
}
5
  • 3
    strings.Bytes doesn't exist anymore on -release, it's []byte(original)
    – marketer
    Mar 4 '10 at 12:42
  • 6
    Looks like Hash.Sum() needs a byte slice as first argument now. h.Sum([]byte{}) will fix this example. Apr 8 '12 at 16:13
  • 11
    I have seen the documentation that this example is taken from but you haven't added anything to it, like an explanation for example. Why is io.WriteString() required? Why does h.Sum() require nil as an argument rather than taking the given string? A a GoNoob reading parroted examples is rather unedifying.
    – Ian Lewis
    Jan 28 '14 at 11:31
  • @IanLewis Writer io.WriteString() is unrelated to the subject. fmt.Fprintf(h, "The fog is getting thicker!") would produce the same result. Even clearer would be a one-liner fmt.Printf("%x\n", md5.Sum([]byte("The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog."))). h.Sum(in) called with any in would append the md5-hash of h to in - i.e. concatenate them (see the source, line 88: golang.org/src/pkg/crypto/md5/md5.go?s=2281:2313#L88). Mar 8 '14 at 1:38
  • Well. I would like to get the string instead of printing it to the console O.o...
    – C4d
    Oct 18 '18 at 14:14
17

I use this to MD5 hash my strings:

import (
    "crypto/md5"
    "encoding/hex"
)

func GetMD5Hash(text string) string {
    hasher := md5.New()
    hasher.Write([]byte(text))
    return hex.EncodeToString(hasher.Sum(nil))
}
7

Here is a function you could use to generate an MD5 hash:

// MD5 hashes using md5 algorithm
func MD5(text string) string {
    algorithm := md5.New()
    algorithm.Write([]byte(text))
    return hex.EncodeToString(algorithm.Sum(nil))
}

I put together a group of those utility hash functions here: https://github.com/shomali11/util

You will find FNV32, FNV32a, FNV64, FNV65a, MD5, SHA1, SHA256 and SHA512

1
  • Well done, but your answer comes late... the same answer has already been provided three years before yours! Jun 26 '20 at 15:59

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