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I want to create an auto GnuPG key generation script for one person atm who, although they run ubuntu, does not feel comfortable using the CLI. In addition, someone else manages their computer, keeping it up to date and in good running order, so they do not have root/sudo access either. And I would really like to try and avoid doing as much as possible with instructions over the phone... been there too many times to know what a PITA that can be!

So I whipped up this script borrowing heavily from an example I found on the gnupg.org forums (I think?). But it does not seem to do anything once the gpg --gen-key --batch command is run no matter how much mouse activity is generated in 3 or 4 minutes. All the echo statements btw are just a temporary means to indicate script progress, which isn't very far atm.

#!/bin/bash

# First run give your server some work, otherwise gpg won't be able to generator random bytes.
#sudo rngd -r /dev/urandom
#no sudo so:
echo -e "\nYou need to begin moving your mouse continuously and in random patterns for as long as it takes to generate a new key. This could take a minute or two, so be patient and just keep moving the mouse.\n"

echo -e "\ngpg --gen-key --batch\n"
gpg --batch --gen-key

%echo Generating a default key
Key-Type: default
Key-Length: 2048
Subkey-Type: default
Name-Real: Firstname Lastname
Name-Comment: No comment
Name-Email: [email protected]
Expire-Date: 0
Passphrase: abcde
%pubring foo.pub
%secring foo.sec
# Do a commit here, so that we can later print "done" :-)
%commit
%echo done

# kill the rngd task.
#sudo service rng-tools stop


echo -e "\ngpg -k\n"
gpg -k

# get key id for newly created passkey
echo -e "\nkId=$(gpg -k Firstname|grep pub|sed -r 's/^pub[ ]*2048R\/([A-Z0-9]{8,})[ ]*.*$/\1/')\n" #; echo "\$kId: ${kId}"
kId=$(gpg -k Firstname|grep pub|sed -r 's/^pub[ ]*2048R\/([A-Z0-9]{8,})[ ]*.*$/\1/') ; echo -e "\n\$kId: ${kId}\n"

# set key as the default key (if desired) by entering this line in your ~/.bashrc
echo -e "\nexport GPGKEY=$kId\n"
export GPGKEY="$kId"

# restart the gpg-agent and source your .bashrc again
echo -e "\nkillall -q gpg-agent\n"
killall -q gpg-agent
eval $(gpg-agent --daemon)
source ~/.bashrc

#create revocation cert
echo -e "\ngpg --output revoke.asc --gen-revoke $GPGKEY\n"
gpg --output revoke.asc --gen-revoke $GPGKEY

# send public key to keyserver
echo -e "\ngpg --send-keys --keyserver keyserver.ubuntu.com $GPGKEY\n"
#gpg --send-keys --keyserver keyserver.ubuntu.com $GPGKEY

I wonder if anyone can see any obvious problems or omissions feeding 'gpg' required key details?

I get the same thing even if I run the script with the sudo rngd -r /dev/random command that I need to bypass for the intended user (no sudo access).

So I guess the prob is in the key params I want to pass to gpg, but I have cross referenced them with the man page and can't seem to find what the problem might be. It is funny though that gpg does not return the error.

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  • Where is GnuPG or your script stuck at? You might be required to use %no-ask-passphrase. If you haven't got enough entropy, just continue working and let GnuPG run in the background. Most operating systems derive entropy from multiple sources, just moving the mouse might not suffice. Do some actual work so there's network traffic, the hard drive is spinning, ..., and it will soon be able to collect enough entropy. Anyway: what operating system are you using?
    – Jens Erat
    May 21, 2014 at 10:50
  • @Jens: sorry, script hangs after gpg --gen-key --batch is echoed and run; I am running Debian stable; I have also tried letting du / run before running the script, which should definitely generate more than enough entropy, but also opened and closed apps like gimp, inkscape and vbox that suck up a lot of resources. I will try adding in the %no-ask-passphrase option as you suggest and see if things progress further or not.
    – nanker
    May 21, 2014 at 11:02
  • @Jens yeah %no-ask-passphrase had no noticeable affect. It is strange though that the %echo Generating a default key immediately following gpg --batch --gen-key command never echoes, perhaps indicating problem with the gpg --batch --gen-key command; but in the few sites I have found dealing with unattended gpg key generation that command seems to be the one used or suggested. But then why doesn't gpg puke back an error, unless it is indeed waiting for some user input, which would then defeat the unattended 'batch' option
    – nanker
    May 21, 2014 at 12:21
  • Very likely found the problem, your script can't work like it is right now. GnuPG waits for input which it never receives, as the commands afterwards should be this input.
    – Jens Erat
    May 21, 2014 at 13:48
  • Note that using 'sudo rngd -r /dev/random' leads to insecure keys, so don't use it for anything you care about! Nov 11, 2014 at 16:26

1 Answer 1

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With batch key generation, GnuPG expects the creation commands in a file, compare with the GnuPG manual page on batch key generation.

cat <<EOT >batch-cmds
%echo Generating a default key
Key-Type: default
Key-Length: 2048
Subkey-Type: default
Name-Real: Firstname Lastname
Name-Comment: No comment
Name-Email: [email protected]
Expire-Date: 0
Passphrase: abcde
%pubring foo.pub
%secring foo.sec
# Do a commit here, so that we can later print "done" :-)
%commit
%echo done
EOT
gpg --batch --gen-key batch-cmds

Consider the security implications of storing the passwords in a file on the hard disk. I'm not sure if you can also pipe the contents directly into GnuPG instead of storing them to a file. Try something like this:

gpg --batch --gen-key <<EOT
%echo Generating a default key
Key-Type: default
Key-Length: 2048
Subkey-Type: default
Name-Real: Firstname Lastname
Name-Comment: No comment
Name-Email: [email protected]
Expire-Date: 0
Passphrase: abcde
%pubring foo.pub
%secring foo.sec
# Do a commit here, so that we can later print "done" :-)
%commit
%echo done
EOT
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  • separate file with params works. Couldn't get params to work inline.
    – nanker
    May 22, 2014 at 9:38
  • This also wasn't described in the docs, but GnuPG seemed to wait for something. Apparently not for batch key generation input.
    – Jens Erat
    May 22, 2014 at 9:39

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