4

The changes to asynchronous testing in Jasmine 2.0 are great in many ways. However, I'm not sure I fully understand how to test asynchronous code when I have no way to bind a callback to the async methods.

How do I test against an unknown number of async events in Jasmine 2.0? Or parallel async events which do not provide a callback call.

In 1.3 I would do this:

describe("my spec", function () {
   it("should check the state of a variable after unknown number of async events", function () {

        // This will execute several async functions in parallel (more than 1).
        // Once they are all complete the 'window.done' variable will be set to "true".
        // This method does not provide a callback.
        fire_parallel_async_methods();

        waitsFor(function () {
            // I know that once this condition is met,
            // all the above async calls are done
            return window.done === true;
        });

        runs(function () {
            // Now I can run the rest of my unit tests
        });
   });
});

Is Tony's answer in Jasmine 2.0: refactoring out 1.3's runs() and waitsFor() the only solution?

Another use case is for event validation. For example:

describe("my spec", function () {
   it("should make sure event is fired", function () {

        // This element has an event binding on 'click' which changes its class.
        // In this test I want to check to make sure the event does the right thing.
        var $element = $('.some-element');

        // Simulate a click
        $element.simulate('click');
        // or $element.click();

        waitsFor(function () {
            // Once the event is done, the element should have a new 'after-event' class
            return $element.hasClass('after-event');
        });
   });
});

In this example, I have no way to access the event's binding, so I can't attach a callback to it. How would I validate this in Jasmine 2.0?

  • If you can't bind a callback to your async methods then you will probably just need to guess and set a timeout. Why don't you use an async library like Q in order to wrap all of your requests and know exactly when they finish? – jraede May 21 '14 at 16:40
  • It's not an option in certain cases where the async events are all inside a third-party module (for example). – Ev Haus May 21 '14 at 16:55
  • You could make a wrapper for that third-party process to make it play nicely with Q or a similar library. Otherwise there's nothing you can really do aside from using a timeout based on how long you think it would take. – jraede May 21 '14 at 17:15
2

I was able to find a workaround using timeouts, which mimics waitsFor() behaviour:

describe("my spec", function () {
   it("should make sure event is fired", function (done) {

        // This element has an event binding on 'click' which changes its class.
        // In this test I want to check to make sure the event does the right thing.
        var $element = $('.some-element');

        // Simulate a click
        $element.simulate('click');
        // or $element.click();

        // Set a timeout to wait for the async event to go through.
        // Pick a time here that will be enough. It's a little messy, but it works for cases
        // where you can't attach a callback. The hardest part is figuring out how long to set
        // the timeout for.
        setTimeout(function () {
            // Do your test here
            expect($element).toHaveClass('after-event');

            // Tell Jasmine the test is finished
            done();
        }, 500);
   });
});

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.