-4

At the moment i try, to build something like that with WPF ! Screenshot: http://i.imgur.com/5G6xBTu.png

I have a ObservableCollection with my "Wecker" Objects. I want to dynamicly add items to the listbox with DataBinding that looks like in the Screenshot. Every try failed so far. What do i need to set in the XAML File??

public static ObservableCollection<Wecker> WeckerCollection = new ObservableCollection<Wecker>();

public ObservableCollection<Wecker> MyWeckerCollection
{
    get { return WeckerCollection; }
} 

Wecker Class

public class Wecker
{
    public ArrayList dayOfWeek { get; set; }
    public DateTime Alarm { get; set; }
    public bool activated { get; set; }
    public bool loop { get; set; }
    public int maxRunTime { get; set; }
    public int id { get; set; }
    public bool schlummern { get; set; }
    public bool antiStandby { get; set; }
    public bool activateMonitor { get; set; }
    public string fileName { get; set; }
    public string Mp3 { get; set; }
    public string Message { get; set; }
    public bool ShowMessage { get; set; }
    public int volume { get; set; } }

I tryed that last time:

<ListBox HorizontalAlignment="Left" Height="392" VerticalAlignment="Top" Width="431" Margin="15,89,0,0"  ScrollViewer.VerticalScrollBarVisibility="Visible" ItemsSource="{Binding MyWeckerCollection}">
        <ListBox.ItemTemplate>
            <DataTemplate>
                <StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal">
                    <CheckBox IsChecked="{Binding activated, Mode=TwoWay}" />
                    <Label Content="{Binding Alarm}" />
                    <Label Content="{Binding dayOfWeek}" />
                    <Label Content="{Binding Message}" />
                    <Label Content="{Binding Mp3}" />
                </StackPanel>
            </DataTemplate>
        </ListBox.ItemTemplate>
    </ListBox>
  • You'll need to show the Xaml you have so far so that people are not forced to start from square 1. – Gayot Fow May 21 '14 at 16:29
  • edited the first post – Diablo May 21 '14 at 16:32
  • Just to be clear, you are successfully adding items to the bound collection, and the UI is not updating? Your code looks fine... – BradleyDotNET May 21 '14 at 16:34
  • DataContext is {Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self}} Do i need to change it ? Then to what value? The MyWeckerCollection?? – Diablo May 21 '14 at 16:39
  • No that looks ok (and if you see the initial objects then the DataContext must be fine). Is it just the add that is breaking or do you not get any data at all? – BradleyDotNET May 21 '14 at 16:42
-4

Try to add the ItemSource to your ListBox and change the Xaml like this : Code behind :

this.YourList.ItemsSource = WeckerCollection;

Xaml :

<ListBox HorizontalAlignment="Left" Height="392" VerticalAlignment="Top" Width="431" Margin="15,89,0,0"  ScrollViewer.VerticalScrollBarVisibility="Visible">
  • That would bind to the DataContext itself, and the code-behind would overwrite this (or be overwritten depending on where that line is put). This has next to 0 chance of helping anything, and is certainly semantically confusing. – BradleyDotNET May 21 '14 at 16:44
  • 2
    So then the binding engine comes around and assigns ItemsSource to the DataContext itself. Definitely not what you want, and still very semantically confusing (you have two sets, which applies? It depends on order, which is very bad) – BradleyDotNET May 21 '14 at 16:48
  • 3
    @Diablo, I strongly suspect there is something else going on here that you need to understand going forward, even though you apparently have it working (how with this code I don't know). I would still recommend checking your initial set. It is probably coming after the binding occurs and you don't implement INotifyPropertyChagned – BradleyDotNET May 21 '14 at 16:51
  • 1
    Setting the ItemsSource property through code-behind like this is not the same as Binding it, and it is not a maintainable long-term solution. The correct way to do this would be to ensure your DataContext for your ListBox is correct, and to bind the ItemsSource the way you are with <ListBox ItemsSource="{Binding MyWeckerCollection}" ... /> – Rachel May 21 '14 at 16:53
  • 1
    @GayotFow I'm pretty sure Blam's answer is correct that the DataContext is not set correctly, however its hard to provide a good suggestion for how to set the DataContext correctly since we're given no information on where MyWeckerCollection exists, or the type of object where DataContext is being bound on. – Rachel May 21 '14 at 16:58
4

I suspect you have not set the DataContext

In the ctor set the DataContext

this.DataContext = this;

or you can do it in XAML in the Window (top) section

DataContext="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource self}}"

If you had set the DataContext then that should work
Are you sure it is in the Windows section

Try (but Path is the default property so that should not be a problem)

ItemsSource="{Binding Path=MyWeckerCollection}"

This may be your problem - public static?
What is the purpose of public static here?

public static ObservableCollection<Wecker> WeckerCollection = new ObservableCollection<Wecker>();

If you want to use a backing property then do it like this

private ObservableCollection<Wecker> myWeckerCollection = new ObservableCollection<Wecker>();
public  ObservableCollection<Wecker> MyWeckerCollection
{
    get { return myWeckerCollection ; }
} 
  • DataContext is {Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self}} Do i need to change it ? Then to what value? The MyWeckerCollection?? – Diablo May 21 '14 at 16:40
  • I did already.... – Diablo May 21 '14 at 16:43
  • 2
    @Diablo Binding to Self binds to the UI object. Does your UI object contain the MyWeckerCollection property? For example, <Window DataContext="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self}}"> would set the DataContext to the Window class, however Window does not have a property called MyWeckerCollection, so your binding would fail. However if you had <local:MyCustomWindow DataContext="{RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self}}"> and MyCustomWindow has a property called MyWeckerCollection, then it would work. – Rachel May 21 '14 at 16:52
  • 1
    @Diablo are you sure? That should work – paparazzo May 21 '14 at 17:08
  • 1
    @Rachel Still would like to know what the purpose is. The OP is not giving the whole story. – paparazzo May 21 '14 at 20:28
3

It sounds like your DataContext is set incorrectly.

You say you are binding the DataContext to {Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self}}, however that just binds the DataContext to the UI object itself.

For example,

<Window DataContext="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self}}">

would set the DataContext to the Window object, however the class Window does not have a property called MyWeckerCollection, so your binding would fail.

If you had

<local:MyCustomWindow DataContext="{RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self}}">

and MyCustomWindow has a property called MyWeckerCollection, then it would work.

I also see your comment here which states:

I am not getting any Data at all and i checked the object, "WeckerCollection" it has Data BEFORE setting it as the DataContext

This leads me to believe that either

A) MyWeckerCollection is not a UI control, in which case you need to update your DataContext binding to something other than Self so it correctly binds to your object containing MyWeckerCollection instead of to the UI object.

B) Or this comment can be read as you are setting the DataContext to MyWeckerCollection itself, and of course the class ObservableCollection<Wecker> does not itself have a property called MyWeckerCollection, so the binding would fail.

So the root cause of your problem is the DataContext is not being set correctly.

Unfortunately, the information you provided is not enough for us to help to identify the correct way to set the DataContext, however if you can provide us with more information I'd be glad to help you out.

Often Visual Studio's binding errors and/or Debug mode is enough to point you in the right direction for fixing the DataContext, or there are some 3rd party tools out there like Snoop which I'd highly recommend for debugging binding errors.

Also if you're new to WPF (which it sounds like you are), and are struggling to understand the purpose of the DataContext and how it works, I'd suggest a blog article of mine written for beginners: What is this "DataContext" you speak of?. Its very important that you understand the DataContext if you are going to be working with WPF. :)

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