23

How do I using with open() as f: ... to write the file in a directory that doesn't exist.

For example:

with open('/Users/bill/output/output-text.txt', 'w') as file_to_write:
    file_to_write.write("{}\n".format(result))

Let's say the /Users/bill/output/ directory doesn't exist. If the directory doesn't exist just create the directory and write the file there.

41

You need to first create the directory.

The mkdir -p implementation from this answer will do just what you want. mkdir -p will create any parent directories as required, and silently do nothing if it already exists.

Here I've implemented a safe_open_w() method which calls mkdir_p on the directory part of the path, before opening the file for writing:

import os, os.path
import errno

# Taken from https://stackoverflow.com/a/600612/119527
def mkdir_p(path):
    try:
        os.makedirs(path)
    except OSError as exc: # Python >2.5
        if exc.errno == errno.EEXIST and os.path.isdir(path):
            pass
        else: raise

def safe_open_w(path):
    ''' Open "path" for writing, creating any parent directories as needed.
    '''
    mkdir_p(os.path.dirname(path))
    return open(path, 'w')

with safe_open_w('/Users/bill/output/output-text.txt') as f:
    f.write(...)
| improve this answer | |
  • This is a great answer. Just for clarification, the mkdir_p function used in your code has to be defined as well, using the link provided. It does not come with Python. – huu May 21 '14 at 21:27
  • @HuuNguyen Added that clarification, thanks. Still not sure why someone downvoted this. – Jonathon Reinhart May 21 '14 at 21:28
  • For exc.errno == errno.EEXIST I got the error: NameError: global name 'errno' is not defined. Changing it to exc.errno == 17 worked. – Jacob Beauchamp Dec 23 '17 at 21:20
  • @Jacob You need to import errno. – Jonathon Reinhart Dec 24 '17 at 16:33
  • 2
    Nowadays, you can avoid the error handling by passing exists_ok=True to os.makedirs – Bananach May 14 '19 at 9:59
12

Make liberal use of the os module:

import os

if not os.path.isdir('/Users/bill/output'):
    os.mkdir('/Users/bill/output')

with open('/Users/bill/output/output-text.txt', 'w') as file_to_write:
    file_to_write.write("{}\n".format(result))
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    This doesn't handle making the intermediate directories as well. – Jonathon Reinhart May 21 '14 at 21:21
  • 1
    Of course not, and this is a complete assumption on my part. I think /Users/bill exists though. – huu May 21 '14 at 21:22
10

For Python 3 can use with pathlib.Path:

from pathlib import Path

p = Path('Users' / 'bill' / 'output')
p.mkdir(exist_ok=True)
(p / 'output-text.txt').open('w').write(...)
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    This should be the accepted answer in 2020. There is no need to mess with custom functions and the os module anymore. – Jeff Wright Aug 9 at 15:46
  • 1
    Couldn't get this working at all in W10 (using WindowsPath)... – mike rodent Oct 24 at 13:49
2

You can just create the path you want to create the file using os.makedirs:

import os
import errno

def make_dir(path):
    try:
        os.makedirs(path, exist_ok=True)  # Python>3.2
    except TypeError:
        try:
            os.makedirs(path)
        except OSError as exc: # Python >2.5
            if exc.errno == errno.EEXIST and os.path.isdir(path):
                pass
            else: raise

Source: this SO solution

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