37

We use Junit as a test framework. We have many projects. We use gradle(Version 1.12) as a build tool. To run the unit test parallelly using gradle we use the bellow script in every projects under test task.

maxParallelForks = Runtime.runtime.availableProcessors()

Ex:

 test {    
         maxParallelForks = Runtime.runtime.availableProcessors()       
    }

We maintain the single gradle.properties file also. Is it possible to define test.maxParallelForks = Runtime.runtime.availableProcessors() in gradle.properties file rather than defining in each build.gradle files under test task?

45

$rootDir/build.gradle:

subprojects {
    tasks.withType(Test) {
        maxParallelForks = Runtime.runtime.availableProcessors()
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    FYI gradle documentation suggests not using all available cores gradle.github.io/performance-guide/#_parallel_test_execution See my answer below – kellyfj Sep 28 '16 at 16:43
  • 2
    The link above didn't work. Try docs.gradle.org/current/userguide/… – Ashley Frieze May 29 '17 at 23:06
  • Below is the error that I get. Error:(69, 0) Could not set unknown property 'maxParallelForks' for configuration container of type org.gradle.api.internal.artifacts.configurations.DefaultConfigurationContainer. <a href="openFile:C:\enlistments\Android\app\build.gradle">Open File</a> – fobbymaster Jan 11 '18 at 22:52
  • is it possible to run tests in parallel in the same JVM? – Capacytron Oct 14 at 15:21
43

The accepted answer above works but the Gradle documentation here suggests you use

maxParallelForks = Runtime.runtime.availableProcessors().intdiv(2) ?: 1

I tried both and after testing both on a 2.3 GHz Intel Core i7 Mac Book Pro with 16GB RAM (4 cores with hyperthreading)

test {
    maxParallelForks = Runtime.runtime.availableProcessors()
}

and

test {    
    maxParallelForks = Runtime.runtime.availableProcessors().intdiv(2) ?: 1      
}

The approach suggested by Gradle documentation produced faster response times for our unit test suite: 7 minutes vs. 8 minutes (compared to the original 13 minutes). In addition my Mac CPU didn't get pegged and the fan didn't kick off.

I assume there is either contention on a shared resource - even if it is only the machine one which we are running the unit tests.

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  • 2
    1 core with hyperthreading != 2 physical cores. so intDiv(2) limits you down to physical core count on a hyperthreaded cpu such as your i7. down side is on a 4 core non hyperthreaded machine you will end up with 2 cores unused for your test run. – TrevJonez Mar 11 '19 at 16:31
  • True but just because cores are unused doesn't mean the tests will run any faster . . . . depending on what else is running on the machine – kellyfj May 10 '19 at 17:26
2

For those of us using Gradle Kotlin DSL in a build.gralde.kts who find themselves here after a google search, I was able to get it to work this way:

tasks.test {
    maxParallelForks = Runtime.getRuntime().availableProcessors()
}

or

tasks.withType<Test> {
        maxParallelForks = (Runtime.getRuntime().availableProcessors() / 2).takeIf { it > 0 } ?: 1
}

as I found here

edit: I ran into some issue as described here. This is (hopefully) my final form:

tasks.withType<Test> {
     systemProperties["junit.jupiter.execution.parallel.enabled"] = true
     systemProperties["junit.jupiter.execution.parallel.mode.default"] = "concurrent" 
     maxParallelForks = (Runtime.getRuntime().availableProcessors() / 2).takeIf { it > 0 } ?: 1
}
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