21

When should I use a directive vs a component in vue.js? I'm implementing some stuff from Bootstrap and it looks like I could do it either way (I'm starting with the dropdown menu).

I get the feeling that a directive is more for manipulating the dom on a single element, while components are for packaging a bunch of data and/or dom manipulation. Is this a good way to look at it?

42

This Stack Overflow question is the #1 result to the Google query "vue directive vs component". Saurshaz’s answer is currently the accepted one and it’s very wrong in Vue 2.0. I imagine this is leading a lot of people astray so I'm going to weigh in here.

The answer to “should I use a directive or a component in Vue” is almost always a component.

Do you want to have reusable HTML? I.e. reusable widgets? Then use a component. Do you want two of these widgets to have discrete data? Then use a component. The data of one will NOT override the data of another. Maybe that was true in Vue 1.0, I don't know. But it's absolutely not true in Vue 2.0. In Vue 2.0, your components have a data function that returns a unique set of data. Consider this real-life of a Vue dropdown that has an HTML markup similar to the UI Bootstrap dropdown:

<template>
  <span class="dropdown sm-dropdown" @click="toggle" :class="{'open': isOpen}">
    <a class="dropdown-toggle">
      <span class="special-field">{{ label }}</span>
    </a>
    <ul class="dropdown-menu">
      <li v-for="choice in choices">
        <a @click.prevent="click(choice)">{{ choice.label }}</a>
      </li>
    </ul>
  </span>
</template>

<script>
  export default {
    name: 'Dropdown',
    props: ['label', 'options', 'onChange'],
    data() {
      return {
        choices: this.options,
        isOpen: false
      }
    },
    methods: {
      click(option) {
        this.onChange(option);
      },
      toggle() {
        this.isOpen = !this.isOpen;
      }
    }
  }
</script>

Now in a parent component, I can do something like this:

<template>    
  <div class="container">
    <dropdown
      label="-- Select --"
      :options="ratingChoices"
      :onChange="toggleChoice"
    >
    </dropdown>

    <dropdown
      label="-- Select --"
      :options="ratingChoices"
      :onChange="toggleChoice"
    >
    </dropdown>
  </div>
</template>

<script>
  import Dropdown from '../dropdown/dropdown.component.vue';

  export default {
    name: 'main-directive',
    components: { Dropdown },
    methods: {
      toggleChoice(newChoice) {
        // Save this state to a store, e.g. Vuex
      }
    },
    computed: {
      ratingChoices() {
        return [{
          value: true,
          label: 'Yes'
        }, {
          value: false,
          label: 'No'
        }]
      }
    }
  }
</script>

There's a decent amount of code here. What's happening is we're setting up a parent component and inside that parent component we have two dropdowns. In other words, the dropdown component is being called twice. The point I'm trying to make in showing this code is this: when you click on the dropdown, the isOpen for that dropdown changes for that directive and for that directive only. Clicking on one of the dropdowns does not affect the other dropdown in any way.

Don't choose between components or directives based on whether or not you're wanting discrete data. Components allow for discrete data.

So when would you want to choose a directive in Vue?

Here are a couple of guidelines that'll hopefully get you thinking in the right direction.

  • You want to choose a directive when you're wanting to extend the functionality of HTML components and you suspect that you’re going to need this extendability across multiple components and you don't want your DOM to get deeper as a result. To understand what I mean by this, let's look at the directives that Vue provides out of the box. Take its v-for directive for instance. It allows you to loop through a collection. That's very useful and you need to be able to do that in any component you want, and you don't want the DOM to get any deeper. That's a good example of when a directive is the better choice.[1]
  • You want to choose a directive when you want a single HTML tag to have multiple functionality. For example, an element that both triggers an Ajax request and that has a custom tooltip. Assuming you want tooltips on elements other than Ajax-triggering elements, it makes sense to split these up into two different things. In this example I would make the tooltip a directive and the Ajax feature driven by a component so I could take advantage of the built-in @click directive that’s available in components.

1 A footnote for the more curious. In theory v-for could have been made as a component, but doing so would have required a deeper-than-necessary DOM every time you wanted to use v-for as well as a more awkward syntax. If Vue had chosen to make a component out of it, instead of this:

<a v-for="link in links" :href="link.href">link.anchor</a>

The syntax would have had to have been this:

<v-for items="link in links">
  <a :href="link.href">link.anchor</a>
</v-for>

Not only is this clumsy, but since the component code would have needed to implement the <slot></slot> syntax in order to get the innerHTML, and since slots cannot be immediate children of a <template> declaration (since there's no guarantee that slot markup has a single node of entry at its top level), this means there would have to be a surrounding top-level element in the component definition for v-for. Hence the DOM would get deeper than necessary. Directive was unequivocally the right choice here.

9

I think of it this way:

Components define widgets - these are sections of html that have behavior associated with them.

Directives modify behavior of sections of html (which may or may not be widgets).

1

I think this difference is better explained with two examples.

  • Components: are wrappers that are best suited when you need to insert (or add) your own HTML tags over something to render it. E.g. a widget, a custom button, etc where you would need to add some HTML tags to show it properly.

  • Directives: don't add tags but rather give you direct access to the HTML tag (to which you have added the directive). This gives you access to modify the attributes of that HTML element directly. E.g. initializing a tooltip, set css styles, bind to an event, etc.

-1

Reusability is a reason for using directives,

While Components are also creating reusable 'widgets', two components in the same html system would overwrite the previous ones 'data', So think of directives in a case like this.

Another point worth thinking of is - Can user be using it via HTML only after some instructions ?

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