1

Consider a toy embedded language:

data Expr =
    App Expr Expr 
  | Lam Pat Expr
  | Case Expr [(Pat, Expr)]

I want to observe any implicit sharing in Expr expressions by using data-reify. To do that, I need a proxy type corresponding to graph nodes:

data ExprF e =
    AppF e e
  | LamF Pat e
  | Case e [(Pat, e)]

and an instance for the MuRef class. I can provide a definition for mapDeRef easily for the App and Lam constructors, but I'm not sure how to deal with the definition corresponding to Case:

instance MuRef Expr where
  type DeRef Expr = ExprF
  mapDeRef f (App e0 e1)  = AppF <$> f e0 <*> f e1
  mapDeRef f (Lam p e)    = LamF p <$> f e
  mapDeRef f (Case e pes) = Case <$> f e <*> ?

Judging by an answer to this question, it looks like it might be possible to make this happen by adding a few clever constructors to ExprF along with corresponding MuRef instances for something like (Pat, Expr) and [(Pat, Expr)]. I tried that:

data ExprF e =
    AppF e e
  | LamF Pat e
  | Pair (Pat, e)
  | CaseF e [(Pat, e)]
  | Cons e e
  | Nil

instance MuRef (Pat, Expr) where
  type DeRef (Pat, Expr) = ExprF
  mapDeRef f (p, e)      = Pair <$> ((,) <$> pure p <*> f e)

instance MuRef [(Pat, Expr)] where
  type DeRef [(Pat, Expr)] = ExprF
  mapDeRef _ []            = pure Nil
  mapDeRef f (pe:pes)      = Cons <$> f pe <*> f pes

But no luck there when it comes to the original mapDeRef binding for Case:

instance MuRef Expr where
  ...
  mapDeRef f (Case e pes)  = Case <$> f e <*> f pes

Could not deduce (u ~ [(Pat, u)])
from the context (Applicative f)
  bound by the type signature for
             mapDeRef :: Applicative f =>
                         (forall b. (MuRef b, DeRef Expr ~ DeRef b) => b -> f u)
                         -> Expr -> f (DeRef Expr u)

Is it possible to define mapDeRef properly for the Case pattern? Is there something simple I'm overlooking?

  • Your code works if you change CaseF to CaseF e e. – Sjoerd Visscher May 23 '14 at 11:24
3

The instance can be defined for the original type:

{-# LANGUAGE TypeFamilies, TupleSections #-}

import qualified Data.Traversable as T
import Data.Reify
import Control.Applicative

data Expr =
    App Expr Expr 
  | Lam Pat Expr
  | Case Expr [(Pat, Expr)]

data ExprF e =
    AppF e e
  | LamF Pat e
  | CaseF e [(Pat, e)]

data Pat -- placeholder

instance MuRef Expr where
    type DeRef Expr = ExprF
    mapDeRef f (App e0 e1)  = AppF <$> f e0 <*> f e1
    mapDeRef f (Lam p e)    = LamF p <$> f e
    mapDeRef f (Case e pes) = CaseF <$> f e <*> T.traverse (\(pat, exp) -> (pat,) <$> f exp) pes

I am not familiar with Data.Reify, I just filled in the instance definition following the types, so I'm not sure if the semantics will correspond to what you want here; but the instance can be definitely done.

Side note: using lens the implementation becomes really clear:

import Control.Lens
-- code omitted
mapDeRef f (Case e pes) = CaseF <$> f e <*> (traverse . _2) f pes
  • @jozefg you mean in order to use the instance? (for me this typechecks as it is) – András Kovács May 23 '14 at 10:47
  • Oh I'm silly, you're using it on the list so you won't need such an instance. – jozefg May 23 '14 at 10:49
  • Fantastic, thanks. I first tried mucking around with traverse but hadn't gotten anything working. Cheers. – jtobin May 23 '14 at 10:54
  • 1
    @jtobin you should be using the TypedHoles feature of GHC 7.8 in case like this, it is an enormous help. – András Kovács May 23 '14 at 11:08
  • 1
    _2 is the same as traverse for 2-tuples. So (traverse . traverse) f pes would work too. – Sjoerd Visscher May 23 '14 at 11:13

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