45

What's the best practice to define an abstract instance attribute, but not as a property?

I would like to write something like:

class AbstractFoo(metaclass=ABCMeta):

    @property
    @abstractmethod
    def bar(self):
        pass

class Foo(AbstractFoo):

    def __init__(self):
        self.bar = 3

Instead of:

class Foo(AbstractFoo):

    def __init__(self):
        self._bar = 3

    @property
    def bar(self):
        return self._bar

    @bar.setter
    def setbar(self, bar):
        self._bar = bar

    @bar.deleter
    def delbar(self):
        del self._bar

Properties are handy, but for simple attribute requiring no computation they are an overkill. This is especially important for abstract classes which will be subclassed and implemented by the user (I don't want to force someone to use @property when he just could have written self.foo = foo in the __init__).

Abstract attributes in Python question proposes as only answer to use @property and @abstractmethod: it doesn't answer my question.

The ActiveState recipe for an abstract class attribute via AbstractAttribute may be the right way, but I am not sure. It also only works with class attributes and not instance attributes.

  • Why do you need to force someone to have a specific attribute on their class? – Philip Adler May 23 '14 at 14:29
  • 11
    Isn't it the whole thing of ABC? If you want my concrete example, I want people to write a class for their sensor and the class should have a self.port attribute. – Lapinot May 23 '14 at 14:49
  • Upon reflection, yes, I suppose it is; though I think that this rather flies in the face of ducktyping... – Philip Adler May 23 '14 at 14:58
  • Maybe I am just asking for too many complications, but it would bother me not to use ABC when doing abstract classes (I think I am just going to use normal base class)... – Lapinot May 23 '14 at 15:14
  • anentropics's solution is simple and works well. Why is it not the accepted answer? – Dave Kielpinski May 1 '17 at 22:38
20

If you really want to enforce that a subclass define a given attribute, you can use metaclass. Personally, I think it may be overkill and not very pythonic, but you could do something like this:

 class AbstractFooMeta(type):

     def __call__(cls, *args, **kwargs):
         """Called when you call Foo(*args, **kwargs) """
         obj = type.__call__(cls, *args, **kwargs)
         obj.check_bar()
         return obj


 class AbstractFoo(object):
     __metaclass__ = AbstractFooMeta
     bar = None

     def check_bar(self):
         if self.bar is None:
             raise NotImplementedError('Subclasses must define bar')


 class GoodFoo(AbstractFoo):
     def __init__(self):
         self.bar = 3


 class BadFoo(AbstractFoo):
     def __init__(self):
         pass

Basically the meta class redefine __call__ to make sure check_bar is called after the init on an instance.

GoodFoo()  # ok
BadFoo ()  # yield NotImplementedError
  • I agree, this may be an overkill! But this solution is interesting... – Lapinot May 23 '14 at 15:31
13

Just because you define it as an abstractproperty on the abstract base class doesn't mean you have to make a property on the subclass.

e.g. you can:

In [1]: from abc import ABCMeta, abstractproperty

In [2]: class X(metaclass=ABCMeta):
   ...:     @abstractproperty
   ...:     def required(self):
   ...:         raise NotImplementedError
   ...:

In [3]: class Y(X):
   ...:     required = True
   ...:

In [4]: Y()
Out[4]: <__main__.Y at 0x10ae0d390>

If you want to initialise the value in __init__ you can do this:

In [5]: class Z(X):
   ...:     required = None
   ...:     def __init__(self, value):
   ...:         self.required = value
   ...:

In [6]: Z(value=3)
Out[6]: <__main__.Z at 0x10ae15a20>
  • it's a shame that the ABC checking doesn't occur at the initialisation of the instance rather than the class definition, that way abstractattribute would be possible. that would allow us to have an abstractattribute_or_property - which is what the op wants – chris Jun 28 '17 at 19:45
  • adding an attr in init doesn't work for me. python3.6 – Artem Zhukov Nov 23 '17 at 5:21
  • 1
    @ArtemZhukov the example above is a Python 3.6 session in IPython, it works. You need the required = None in class body as well though, as shown above. – Anentropic Nov 23 '17 at 10:06
  • 1
    @chris, see my stackoverflow.com/a/50381071/6646912 for an ABC subclass which does the checking at initialisation. – krassowski Oct 30 '18 at 15:11
  • @krassowski that doesn't achieve anything more than the @abstractproperty definitions above, but is worse because it doesn't handle attributes defined in class body rather than __init__ – Anentropic Oct 30 '18 at 16:32
11

It's 2018, we deserve a bit better solution:

from better_abc import ABCMeta, abstract_attribute    # see below

class AbstractFoo(metaclass=ABCMeta):

    @abstract_attribute
    def bar(self):
        pass

class Foo(AbstractFoo):
    def __init__(self):
        self.bar = 3

class BadFoo(AbstractFoo):
    def __init__(self):
        pass

It will behave like this:

Foo()     # ok
BadFoo()  # will raise: NotImplementedError: Can't instantiate abstract class BadFoo
# with abstract attributes: bar

This answer uses same approach as the accepted answer, but integrates well with built-in ABC and does not require boilerplate of check_bar() helpers.

Here is the better_abc.py content:

from abc import ABCMeta as NativeABCMeta

class DummyAttribute:
    pass

def abstract_attribute(obj=None):
    if obj is None:
        obj = DummyAttribute()
    obj.__is_abstract_attribute__ = True
    return obj


class ABCMeta(NativeABCMeta):

    def __call__(cls, *args, **kwargs):
        instance = NativeABCMeta.__call__(cls, *args, **kwargs)
        abstract_attributes = {
            name
            for name in dir(instance)
            if getattr(getattr(instance, name), '__is_abstract_attribute__', False)
        }
        if abstract_attributes:
            raise NotImplementedError(
                "Can't instantiate abstract class {} with"
                " abstract attributes: {}".format(
                    cls.__name__,
                    ', '.join(abstract_attributes)
                )
            )
        return instance

The nice thing is that you can do:

class AbstractFoo(metaclass=ABCMeta):
    bar = abstract_attribute()

and it will work same as above.

Also one can use:

class ABC(ABCMeta):
    pass

to define custom ABC helper. PS. I consider this code to be CC0.

This could be improved by using AST parser to raise earlier (on class declaration) by scanning the __init__ code, but it seems to be an overkill for now (unless someone is willing to implement).

  • 1
    Pretty neat, this is indeed the kind of solution i was suspecting to exist (i think i'm gonna change the accepted answer). Still with the hindsight, the syntax of declaration is just really weird. On the long run what works in python is duck-typing: ABC and annotations will just make the code look like poor java (syntax and structure). – Lapinot May 18 '18 at 2:12
  • 1
    I wish I could upvote this more. Hopefully this solution will become integrated into the standard library at some point. Thank you. – BCR Feb 21 at 16:37
7

The problem isn't what, but when:

from abc import ABCMeta, abstractmethod

class AbstractFoo(metaclass=ABCMeta):
    @abstractmethod
    def bar():
        pass

class Foo(AbstractFoo):
    bar = object()

isinstance(Foo(), AbstractFoo)
#>>> True

It doesn't matter that bar isn't a method! The problem is that __subclasshook__, the method of doing the check, is a classmethod, so only cares whether the class, not the instance, has the attribute.


I suggest you just don't force this, as it's a hard problem. The alternative is forcing them to predefine the attribute, but that just leaves around dummy attributes that just silence errors.

  • Yes, this is what I was doing since now (but it's weird to define it as an abstract method). But it doesn't solve the question of instance attribute. – Lapinot May 23 '14 at 15:11
  • I think this is an even better (and more pythonic) solution. – kawing-chiu Jun 15 '16 at 2:48
0

I've searched around for this for awhile but didn't see anything I like. As you probably know if you do:

class AbstractFoo(object):
    @property
    def bar(self):
        raise NotImplementedError(
                "Subclasses of AbstractFoo must set an instance attribute "
                "self._bar in it's __init__ method")

class Foo(AbstractFoo):
    def __init__(self):
        self.bar = "bar"

f = Foo()

You get an AttributeError: can't set attribute which is annoying.

To get around this you can do:

class AbstractFoo(object):

    @property
    def bar(self):
        try:
            return self._bar
        except AttributeError:
            raise NotImplementedError(
                "Subclasses of AbstractFoo must set an instance attribute "
                "self._bar in it's __init__ method")

class OkFoo(AbstractFoo):
    def __init__(self):
        self._bar = 3

class BadFoo(AbstractFoo):
    pass

a = OkFoo()
b = BadFoo()
print a.bar
print b.bar  # raises a NotImplementedError

This avoids the AttributeError: can't set attribute but if you just leave off the abstract property all together:

class AbstractFoo(object):
    pass

class Foo(AbstractFoo):
    pass

f = Foo()
f.bar

You get an AttributeError: 'Foo' object has no attribute 'bar' which is arguably almost as good as the NotImplementedError. So really my solution is just trading one error message from another .. and you have to use self._bar rather than self.bar in the init.

  • First I want to mention that despite naming your class AbstractFoo, you didn't actually make your class abstract, and this answer is completely unrelated to the context set out by OP. That said, your workaround for regular properties' "unsettable attribute" problem may be kindof expensive, depending on how often the attribute is accessed. A cheaper one (based on your first code block) is this in your Foo.__init__(): self.__dict__['bar'] = "bar" – CryingCyclops Feb 26 at 18:46
0

Following https://docs.python.org/2/library/abc.html you could do something like this in Python 2.7:

from abc import ABCMeta, abstractproperty


class Test(object):
    __metaclass__ = ABCMeta

    @abstractproperty
    def test(self): yield None

    def get_test(self):
        return self.test


class TestChild(Test):

    test = None

    def __init__(self, var):
        self.test = var


a = TestChild('test')
print(a.get_test())

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