3

I'm on Codecademy, the section called "Practice Makes Perfect", on problem 10/15, the word-censoring one. The problem goes like this:

Write a function called censor that takes two strings, text and word, as input. It should return the text with the word you chose replaced with asterisks.

My idea was to do this:

def censor(text, word):
    length_of_word = len(word)
    word_now_censored = '*' * length_of_word
    wordlist = text.split()
    for item in wordlist:
        if item == word:
            item = word_now_censored
    return " ".join(wordlist)

But, so it seems, changing the value of item in the for loop doesn't change the value of the item in the list.

I thought another way could be to use a while loop, going from i = 0 to i < len(wordlist), and then modify wordlist[i] as needed, but I'd just like to understand why my for-loop method doesn't work.

16 Answers 16

6

Change it to this:

for index, item in enumerate(wordlist):
    if item == word:
        wordlist[index] = word_now_censored
3
  • that looks really cool, could you please explain how you can have 2 words after for, before in?
    – mdemont
    May 23, 2014 at 17:24
  • enumerate is a built-in function. While iterating over a sequence, it allows you access to the current index of the item being accessed. You can use it like this: for index, item in enumerate(["a", "b", "c"]): print index, item, which will print 0 a 1 b 2 c. As you can see, 0 corresponds to the index of the first element of list ["a", "b", "c"], 1 to the second, and so on. May 23, 2014 at 17:45
  • 1
    @MaximedeMontbron If an answer solved your question, you can accept it by checking the green checkmark left of the question. This signals to other users that this question has been answered satisfactorily and doesn't require additional answers. (Alternatively, if you feel your question has not been answered satisfactorily, please edit your question and specify what you feel is missing.) Choose the answer that you feel best helped you solve your problem. May 26, 2014 at 7:49
4

You could simply use re.sub to replace all instances of word:

import re

def censor(text, word):
    return re.sub(r'\b{}\b'.format(word), '*' * len(word), text)
2
  • This is the most Pythonic way in my opinion
    – Elias
    May 23, 2014 at 15:24
  • 3
    This might replace things you don't really want to replace though. For example "grass", might become "gr***".
    – dano
    May 23, 2014 at 15:26
1

Your observation is right

changing the value of item in the for loop doesn't change the value of the item in the list.

There are many ways to go about this. Here is one way. Create another variable new_words_list. Append the word from wordlist to new_words_list if it not word. Else append word_now_censored to new_words_list.

Which translates to:

def censor(text, word):
    length_of_word = len(word)
    word_now_censored = '*' * length_of_word
    wordlist = text.split()
    new_words_list = []
    for item in wordlist:
        if item == word:
            new_words_list.append(word_now_censored)
        else:
            new_words_list.append(item)

    return " ".join(new_words_list)
1
def censor(text,word):
    text=list(text)

    for n in range(0,len(text)):
        i=0
        while 1==1:
            for i in range(0,len(word)):
                if  text[n+i]==word[i]:
                    i+=1
                else:             
                    break
            if i==len(word):
                for m in range(0,i):
                    text[n+m]='*'
            else:
                break
        n+=i
    return "".join(text)

print censor("this hack is wack hack", "hack") 
0

Here is another version:

def censor(text, word):
    lst = text.split()
    while word in lst:
        index = lst.index(word)
        lst.remove(word)
        lst.insert(index,'*' * len(word))
    return " ".join(lst)
0

censor takes two strings, text and word, as input. It returns the text with the word you chose replaced with asterisks.

def censor(text,word):
    result = ""
    count = 0
    no_of_stars = 0
    split_list = text.split()
    for i in split_list:
        count += 1
        if(i==word):
            result += "*" * len(i)
        else:
            result +=i
        if(count != len(split_list)):
            result += " "    
    return result   
0

Here's my version. Simply build a new word of asterisks the same length as the word, then replace it.

def censor(text, word):
if word in text:
    blabber = ""
    while True:
        blabber += "*"
        if len(blabber) == len(word):
            break
    return text.replace(word, blabber)
0
def censor(text,word):
res = text.split()
temp = ""
for i,j in enumerate(res):
    if j == word:
        res[i] = "*" * len(word)
return " ".join(res)
0

Just solved it and this was my solution:

def censor(text, word):
   textList = text.split()

   for index, var in enumerate(textList):
       if var == word:
          textList[index] = "*" * len(word)

   return " ".join(textList)
0
def censor(text,word) :
    c=''
    for i in text.split() : 
        if i == word : 
             i = "*" * len(word)
             c += ' ' + i
        else :
            c += ' ' + i
    return c       


print censor("this hack is wack hack", "hack")
0
def censor(text, word):
lista=[]
for i in text.split():
    if i==word:
        lista+=['*'*len(word)]
    else:
        lista+=[i]
return ' '.join(lista)
0
def censor(text, word):
    new_text = text.split()
    ctext = []
    for item in new_text:
        if item == word:
            item = "*" *len(word)
        ctext.append(item)
    return " ".join(ctext)
0
def censor(text, word):
    a = word
    b = len(a)
    for a in text:
        text = text.replace(word, "*"*b)
    return text 
1
  • While this code block may answer the question, it would be best if you could provide a little explanation for why it does so.
    – Rakete1111
    May 18, 2016 at 12:59
0

My idea was just:

def censor(text, word):
    answer = text.replace(word, "*"*len(word))
    return answer

This is might be simple one but I think simple is good. And I didn't have to use any loop, is it good? If you like my answer, please let me know, I'll be really happy. Thank you

0

I've made it quite simple and I don't see why no one mentioned this.

def censor(text, word):
    return text.replace(word,"*" * len(word))
1
  • I believe it is because if you call censor("word or words", "or"), you should get "word ** words", not "w**d ** w**ds".
    – John S
    Nov 13, 2016 at 6:38
0

I'll appreciate it if you will take a look at this one.

def censor(text, word):
    if word in text:
        return text.replace(word, '*' * len(word))

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