28

Let's say I have two strings:

  • one is XML data
  • and the other is XSL data.

The xml and xsl data are stored in database columns, if you must know.

How can I transform the XML in C# w/o saving the xml and xsl as files first? I would like the output to be a string, too (HTML from the transformation).

It seems C# prefers to transform via files. I couldn't find a string-input overload for Load() in XslCompiledTransform. So, that's why I'm asking.

48

Here's what I went with. It's a combination of your answers. I voted up the answers that inspired this:

string output = String.Empty;
using (StringReader srt = new StringReader(xslInput)) // xslInput is a string that contains xsl
using (StringReader sri = new StringReader(xmlInput)) // xmlInput is a string that contains xml
{
    using (XmlReader xrt = XmlReader.Create(srt))
    using (XmlReader xri = XmlReader.Create(sri))
    {
        XslCompiledTransform xslt = new XslCompiledTransform();
        xslt.Load(xrt);
        using (StringWriter sw = new StringWriter())
        using (XmlWriter xwo = XmlWriter.Create(sw, xslt.OutputSettings)) // use OutputSettings of xsl, so it can be output as HTML
        {
            xslt.Transform(xri, xwo);
            output = sw.ToString();
        }
    }
}

Note: this statement is required in the xsl, in order to output as HTML:

<xsl:output method="html" omit-xml-declaration="yes" />
3
  • can someone show me a small sample of strings of both xml and xsl? or point me to a resource that shows all of this. I'm having trouble forming the strings because of double quotes around the attribute values. – Rod Mar 25 '17 at 0:15
  • @Rod: Use @ and then double the double quotes: myString = @"<root xmlns=""http:foo.namespace"" /> – Mauricio Feijo May 30 '17 at 13:48
  • StringReader is in System.IO – cdonner Jun 27 '17 at 2:39
6

You can XmlReader.Create() from a StringReader or a MemoryStream . XslCompileTransfrom can Load() from an XmlReader.

1
  • 2
    I'd use a StringReader to pass to the XmlReader.Create, actually. – John Saunders Mar 5 '10 at 3:10
5

It took me a long time (literally years) to work out how concise code using Stream and/or TextWriter can be if you use the proper idioms.

Assuming transform and input are strings:

StringWriter sw = new StringWriter();
using (XmlReader xrt = XmlReader.Create(new StringReader(transform))
using (XmlReader xri = XmlReader.Create(new StringReader(input))
using (XmlWriter xwo = XmlWriter.Create(sw))
{
   XslCompiledTransform xslt = new XslCompiledTransform();
   xslt.Load(xrt);
   xslt.Transform(xri, xwo);
}
string output = sw.ToString();
2
  • -1: Robert, why isn't sw in a using block? In fact, both of the StringReader instances should be as well. They won't be automatically disposed when the XmlReader instances are. – John Saunders Mar 5 '10 at 17:20
  • Aactually the using blocks for the XmlReaders are unnecessary. The only object that it's really essential to Close in this scenario is the XmlWriter, so that any pending writes to the StringWriter get flushed before you get the results. Putting the StringWriter inside the using block would make it possible that the XmlWriter wouldn't be flushed and closed before you got the string's value. – Robert Rossney Mar 5 '10 at 20:16
1

edit: using-blocks added

// input-xml
string xmlinput = String.Empty;
// xslt
string xsltinput = String.Empty;
// output-xml
string xmloutput = String.Empty;

// Prepare input-xml
XPathDocument doc = new XPathDocument(new StringReader(xmlinput));

// Prepare XSLT
XslTransform xslt = new XslTransform();
// Creates a XmlReader from your xsl string
using (XmlReader xmlreader = XmlReader.Create(new StringReader(xsltinput)))
{
    //Load the stylesheet.
    xslt.Load(xmlreader);

    // transform
    using (StringWriter sw = new StringWriter())
    {
        xslt.Transform(doc, null, sw);

        // save to string
        xmloutput = sw.ToString();
    }
}
1
  • Just using'ified. Now using blocks. Okay like that? Thanks for feedback. – Phil Rykoff Mar 5 '10 at 18:34
1

I send the xml content and then load the XSLT document, apply the transformation and then return the new xml.

public static string Transform(string xmlString)
{
    string output = String.Empty;
    try
    {
        // Load an XML string into the XPathDocument.
        StringReader rdr = new StringReader(xmlString);
        XPathDocument myXPathDoc = new XPathDocument(rdr);

        var myXslTrans = new XslTransform();
        //load the Xsl 
        myXslTrans.Load("XSLTFile.xslt");
        //create the output stream
        StringWriter sw = new StringWriter();
        XmlWriter xwo = XmlWriter.Create(sw);
        //do the actual transform of Xml
        myXslTrans.Transform(myXPathDoc, null, xwo);
        output = sw.ToString();
        xwo.Close();
        return output;
    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Exception: {0}", e.ToString());
        throw;
    }
}

NOTE: "XSLTFile.xslt" It is added to the solution and set the property "Copy to Output Directory" to "Copy always".

0

A VB.Net version inspired by Robert Rossney's answer:

Private Function TransformXML(XMLPath As String, XSLPath As String) As String
    Dim XSLT As XslCompiledTransform = New XslCompiledTransform()
    Dim sWriter As StringWriter = New StringWriter
    Dim xReader As XmlReader = XmlReader.Create(XMLPath)

    Using xWriter As XmlWriter = XmlWriter.Create(sWriter)
        XSLT.Load(XSLPath)
        XSLT.Transform(xReader, xWriter)
    End Using
    Return sWriter.ToString
End Function
-1

I would use the XmlReader.Create(DatabaseBlobStream) and XmlWriter.Create(StringBuilder) overloads. Using the following DatabaseBlobStream object

DatabaseBlobStream.cs

internal class DatabaseBlobStream : Stream
{
    private readonly IDataReader reader;
    private readonly int columnIndex;
    private long streamPosition;

    internal DatabaseBlobStream(IDataReader reader, int columnIndex)
    {
        this.reader = reader;
        this.columnIndex = columnIndex;
    }

    public override bool CanRead
    {
        get
        {
            return reader.GetFieldType(columnIndex) == typeof (byte[])
                   && !reader.IsDBNull(columnIndex);
        }
    }

    public override bool CanSeek
    {
        get { return false; }
    }

    public override bool CanWrite
    {
        get { return false; }
    }

    public override void Flush()
    {
        throw new Exception("This stream does not support writing.");
    }

    public override long Length
    {
        get { throw new Exception("This stream does not support the Length property."); }
    }

    public override long Position
    {
        get
        {
            return streamPosition;
        }
        set
        {
            streamPosition = value;
        }
    }

    public override int Read(byte[] buffer, int offset, int count)
    {
        if (reader.IsDBNull(columnIndex))
            return 0;

        int bytesRead = (int)reader.GetBytes(columnIndex, streamPosition + offset, buffer, 0, count);
        streamPosition += bytesRead;
        return bytesRead;
    }

    public override long Seek(long offset, SeekOrigin origin)
    {
        throw new Exception("This stream does not support seeking.");
    }

    public override void SetLength(long value)
    {
        throw new Exception("This stream does not support setting the Length.");
    }

    public override void Write(byte[] buffer, int offset, int count)
    {
        throw new Exception("This stream does not support writing.");
    }

    public override void Close()
    {
        try
        {
            reader.Close();
        }
        finally
        {
            base.Close();
        }
    }

    protected override void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        try
        {
            reader.Dispose();
        }
        finally
        {
            base.Dispose(disposing);
        }
    }
}
2
  • Ben, what is the advantage of this approach over Henchman's or Moog's? – Bill Paetzke Mar 5 '10 at 7:03
  • How would you use that DatabaseBlobStream class to transform a XML string? – Roberto May 19 '17 at 20:10

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