173

I would like to change this Makefile:

SHELL := /bin/bash
PATH  := node_modules/.bin:$(PATH)

boot:
    @supervisor         \
      --harmony         \
      --watch etc,lib       \
      --extensions js,json      \
      --no-restart-on error     \
        lib

test:
    NODE_ENV=test mocha         \
      --harmony             \
      --reporter spec       \
        test

clean:
    @rm -rf node_modules

.PHONY: test clean

to:

SHELL := /bin/bash
PATH  := node_modules/.bin:$(PATH)

boot:
    @supervisor         \
      --harmony         \
      --watch etc,lib       \
      --extensions js,json      \
      --no-restart-on error     \
        lib

test: NODE_ENV=test
test:
    mocha                   \
      --harmony             \
      --reporter spec       \
        test

clean:
    @rm -rf node_modules

.PHONY: test clean

Unfortunately the second one does not work (the node process still runs with the default NODE_ENV.

What did I miss?

1
  • Your Unfortunately comment stems from a misunderstanding between an environment variable versus a Makefile variable. The best way to prove that an environment variable has been set, is to query this environment variable inside another program that make wil call. Only doing echo $(BLAH) is merely evaluating Makefile's key/value mechanism inside the Makefile. In python, you can print(os.getenv("MURDOC")) to truly query the environment variable. – eigenfield Aug 4 '20 at 12:28
182

Make variables are not exported into the environment of processes make invokes... by default. However you can use make's export to force them to do so. Change:

test: NODE_ENV = test

to this:

test: export NODE_ENV = test

(assuming you have a sufficiently modern version of GNU make >= 3.77 ).

8
  • 4
    I have GNU make 3.81, and all: <\n\t>export PROJ_ROOT=$(CURDIR)<\n\t>echo $(PROJ_ROOT)<\n> outputs the correct expansion for the first row, but only echo for the second one. PROJ_ROOT is not set after running make. Spaces around = give "bad variable name" for export. Having the first row as prerequisite as in your example gives "commands commence before first target" – Gauthier Oct 30 '14 at 9:18
  • 10
    @Gauthier yes of course. That's not what I wrote. You added a <\n\t> after the all:, which is not in my example. My example is intended to be used as written: it's defining a target-specific variable, NOT adding a command to the recipe. Also you cannot use a recipe and a target-specific variable on a target at the same time: you have to write the target twice. See the second example in the question, and ask a new question if this doesn't help explain it: there's not enough space or formatting in comments. – MadScientist Oct 30 '14 at 12:00
  • 1
    What about multiple variables? – holms Sep 3 '18 at 13:14
  • 1
    That's fine but your added it to the head of target. Just listing them in context of target won't work? Because it doesn't work for me – holms Sep 11 '18 at 13:14
  • 2
    Target-specific variables were added in GNU make 3.77. They are exportable as of GNU make 3.81. See git.savannah.gnu.org/cgit/make.git/tree/NEWS – MadScientist Nov 18 '18 at 17:38
131

As MadScientist pointed out, you can export individual variables with:

export MY_VAR = foo  # Available for all targets

Or export variables for a specific target (target-specific variables):

my-target: export MY_VAR_1 = foo
my-target: export MY_VAR_2 = bar
my-target: export MY_VAR_3 = baz

my-target: dependency_1 dependency_2
  echo do something

You can also specify the .EXPORT_ALL_VARIABLES target to—you guessed it!—EXPORT ALL THE THINGS!!!:

.EXPORT_ALL_VARIABLES:

MY_VAR_1 = foo
MY_VAR_2 = bar
MY_VAR_3 = baz

test:
  @echo $$MY_VAR_1 $$MY_VAR_2 $$MY_VAR_3

see .EXPORT_ALL_VARIABLES

4
  • 2
    Oddly enough I did test it earlier that showed it worked.. (not sure why now..) I can go back and delete the comment I guess.. – AnthonyC Aug 22 '18 at 5:53
  • 3
    @AnthonyC It works because there are two MY_VARs: one is makefile variable accessed as ${MY_VAR} and another one is bash exported variable, accessed as $$MY_VAR – Sergei Mar 19 '19 at 7:48
  • Useful. But cannot find a way to export only a set of variables. – Eric Chen Jun 27 '19 at 22:29
  • Note if the variable already exists in your makefile and you just want to export it to another command, you can use the syntax export var ?= without assigning a new value – smac89 May 1 at 18:47
19

I only needed the environment variables locally to invoke my test command, here's an example setting multiple environment vars in a bash shell, and escaping the dollar sign in make.

SHELL := /bin/bash

.PHONY: test tests
test tests:
    PATH=./node_modules/.bin/:$$PATH \
    JSCOVERAGE=1 \
    nodeunit tests/
2
  • 7
    Please edit your answer to include some explanation. Code-only answers do very little to educate future SO readers. Your answer is in the moderation queue for being low-quality. – mickmackusa Apr 22 '17 at 2:36
  • ThorSummoner, this solution is not as flexible as the approach above. For example, one might wish to have one single rule for invoking a command and then several other rules which modify that behaviour by setting environment variables. Consider: test: cmd perf: export PERF="yes" perf: test If 'cmd' is complicated (and it usually is), then this approach is a lot easier to maintain. Your approach to setting the environment variable in the cmd rule makes this more difficult. – Keith Hanlan Jul 26 '17 at 15:10
3

I would re-write the original target test, taking care the needed variable is defined IN THE SAME SUB-PROCESS as the application to launch:

test:
    ( NODE_ENV=test mocha --harmony --reporter spec test )

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