Xcode doesn't terminate a test routine at failed assertions. Is this correct? I fail to understand the reason behind this and I'd like it to behave like assert and have it terminate the program. With the following test, it will print "still running". Is this intended?

- (void)testTest
{
    XCTAssertTrue(false, @"boo");
    NSLog(@"still running");
}

I don't see how this would be useful, because often subsequent code would crash when pre-conditions aren't met:

- (void)testTwoVectors
{
    XCTAssertTrue(vec1.size() == vec2.size(), @"vector size mismatch");

    for (int i=0; i<vec1.size(); i++) {
        XCTAssertTrue(vec1[i] == vec2[i]);
    }
}
  • "boo" is not a format string, so your example is a poor one. You probably mean @"boo". – matt May 24 '14 at 15:24
  • Yes, I forgot the "@" – Phantrast May 24 '14 at 15:25

you can change this behavior of XCTAssert<XX>.
In setup method change value self.continueAfterFailure to NO.

IMO stopping the test after test assertion failure is better behavior (prevents crashes what lead to not running other important tests). If test needs continuation after a failure this means that test case is simply to long an should be split.

Yes, it is intended. That's how unit tests work. Failing a test doesn't terminate the testing; it simply fails the test (and reports it as such). That's valuable because you don't want to lose the knowledge of whether your other tests pass or fail merely because one test fails.

If (as you say in your addition) the test method then proceeds to throw an exception, well then it throws an exception - and you know why. But the exception is caught, so what's the problem? The other test methods still run, so your results are still just what you would expect: one method fails its test and then stops, the other tests do whatever they do. You will then see something like this in the log:

Executed 7 tests, with 2 failures (1 unexpected) in 0.045 (0.045) seconds

The first failure is the XCTAssert. The second is the exception.

  • 3
    I think you misunderstood my question. I know that each test method is independent of the others, but in this case within one method, one failing assertion doesn't lead to the termination of that method. I don't see how this would be useful, because often subsequent code would crash when pre-conditions aren't met. – Phantrast May 24 '14 at 15:07
  • 2
    I think you misunderstood my answer. You are asking so that means you don't know. One's intuitive expectations are not what determines the answer; reality does that. – matt May 24 '14 at 15:24
  • Ah, I see. That's clear now. Thanks. – Phantrast May 24 '14 at 15:30
  • I've expanded my answer a bit to show you what will happen in your expanded question and why this is coherent. – matt May 24 '14 at 15:32
  • 1
    @matt "That's how unit tests work" isn't a useful answer. For example, in JUnit, asserts halt the test method (the test class continues to run other test methods of course). This is opposite of what XCTAssert does by default. From a JUnit background, it is confusing why you would want to plow ahead after an assert failed within a method - you know you are in a bad state at that point, and you know why, what is the point of running the remaining code within that method when it may depend on data the assert has told you isn't what you want. The OP's question is valid and you misunderstood it. – Michael Peterson Apr 6 '16 at 20:46

Just to clarify, you are correct that if a test generates a "failure", that this individual test will still continue to execute. If you want to stop that particular test, you should simply return from it.

The fact that the test resumes can be very useful, whereby you can identify not only the first issue that resulted in the test failure, but all issues resulting in the test failure.

You say:

I don't see how this would be useful, because often subsequent code would crash when pre-conditions aren't met:

- (void)testTwoVectors
{
    XCTAssertTrue(vec1.size() == vec2.size(), @"vector size mismatch");

    for (int i=0; i<vec1.size(); i++) {
        XCTAssertTrue(vec1[i] == vec2[i]);
    }
}

Your example is ironic, because, yes, I can understand why you'd want to return if the two vectors were different sizes, but if they happened to be the same size, the second half of your example test is a perfect example of why you might not want it to stop after generating a failure.

Let's assume that the vectors were the same size and five of the items were not the same. It might be nice to have the test report all five of those failures in this test, not just the first one.

When review test results, it's just sometimes nice to know all of the sources of failure, not just the first one.

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