Given the following code that deletes rows in a batch.

List<City> list = ...
int i=0;

for(City city:list)
{
    if(++i%49==0)
    {
        entityManager.flush();
    }

    entityManager.remove(city);
}

The JPA 2.1 criteria API provides CriteriaDelete to perform a bulk delete. Accordingly, the following code executes a DELETE FROM city WHERE id IN(...) query.

CriteriaBuilder criteriaBuilder=entityManager.getCriteriaBuilder();
CriteriaDelete<City> criteriaDelete = criteriaBuilder.createCriteriaDelete(City.class);

Root<City> root = criteriaDelete.from(City.class);
criteriaDelete.where(root.in(list));
entityManager.createQuery(criteriaDelete).executeUpdate();

But this should not be equivalent of the first case. What is the equivalent of the first case? It should perform deletion in a batch.

  • I wouldn't expect Criteria API to provide equivalent for the batch example. Criteria API is for a single query mapping while the batch delete is applying a single query (prepared statement) several times then flushing. – macias May 24 '14 at 19:58
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The equivalent would be to execute a query to delete a single entity in a for loop, something like:

for(City city:list)
{
    if(++i%49==0)
    {
        entityManager.flush();
    }

    CriteriaBuilder criteriaBuilder=entityManager.getCriteriaBuilder();
    CriteriaDelete<City> criteriaDelete = criteriaBuilder.createCriteriaDelete(City.class);

    Root<City> root = criteriaDelete.from(City.class);
    criteriaDelete.where(root.equal(city));
    entityManager.createQuery(criteriaDelete).executeUpdate();
}

Each of these 50 statements might not get put into the same batch - it depends on if your JPA provider supports batching or not. The loop seems less efficient, as you end up with X statements rather than a single DELETE FROM city WHERE id IN(...) you did with the original bulk delete.

  • A better solution would be to create a named query and using the city's ID as a parameter so the query can be reused. The code gives you the idea I hope though. – Chris May 26 '14 at 16:00
  • Wouldn't the last statement, entityManager.createQuery(criteriaDelete).executeUpdate(); execute a query directly to the underlying database on every iteration of the loop rather than putting it into a batch and then execute them all (50 per batch) in a single round trip to the database? – Tiny May 26 '14 at 16:04
  • Is this query DELETE FROM city WHERE id IN(...) efficient, in case there so many rows to be deleted? – Tiny May 26 '14 at 16:08
  • I cannot comment on database efficiency, as don't have much experience at that level, but there might be a limit on the number of arguments you can pass to an IN statement that might cause you to break it up. You will have to look at your provider's options and do a comparison to see what is more efficient for your application and database setup. – Chris May 27 '14 at 12:14

In your case, it might be that the Criteria API 2.1 Bulk Delete performs better:

CriteriaBuilder criteriaBuilder=entityManager.getCriteriaBuilder();
CriteriaDelete<City> criteriaDelete = criteriaBuilder.createCriteriaDelete(City.class);

Root<City> root = criteriaDelete.from(City.class);
criteriaDelete.where(root.in(list));
entityManager.createQuery(criteriaDelete).executeUpdate();

For batch delete, you don't need Criteria API at all. In fact, you can leave the code untouched:

List<City> list = ...
int i=0;

for(City city:list {
    if(++i%49==0) {
        entityManager.flush();
    }
    entityManager.remove(city);
}

What you need to do is to enable JDBC batch updates like this:

<property name="hibernate.jdbc.batch_size" value="50"/>

However, the entity-level batching example needs some improvement. As I explained in this article, the best way to do batch processing with JPA and Hibernate if you process hundreds of entities, it is a good idea to commit the transaction as well during the batch:

int entityCount = 50;
int batchSize = 25;

EntityManager entityManager = null;
EntityTransaction transaction = null;

try {
    entityManager = entityManagerFactory()
        .createEntityManager();

    transaction = entityManager.getTransaction();
    transaction.begin();

    for ( int i = 0; i < entityCount; ++i ) {
        if ( i > 0 && i % batchSize == 0 ) {
            entityManager.flush();
            entityManager.clear();

            transaction.commit();
            transaction.begin();
        }

        Post post = new Post( 
            String.format( "Post %d", i + 1 ) 
        );
        entityManager.persist( post );
    }

    transaction.commit();
} catch (RuntimeException e) {
    if ( transaction != null && 
         transaction.isActive()) {
        transaction.rollback();
    }
    throw e;
} finally {
    if (entityManager != null) {
        entityManager.close();
    }
}

This way, you will avoid a long-running transaction that can hurt performance in both 2PL and MVCC-based relational databases.

More, consider that you need to update 10K entries and delete 3k rows, would you really want to roll back everything just because the last SQL statement failed?

The atomicity in ACID is great for OLTP where you only touch a small subset of data. For OLAP, or bulk processing, it's better to use bulk updates and deletes instead.

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.