16

Here's my javascript object, I would like to know how to avoid using "this" so many times in prototype. I know there is lot of theory and links for prototypal inhericance and this has probably been answered already, but as I haven't been able to make all ends meet, I thought this may be worth another question.

function shape(smth) {
    this.a = smth
    this.b = 2
    this.c = 3
}

shape.prototype.doCalculus = function () {
    return this.a * this.b + this.c - (2 * (this.b + this.c) + this.a);
}

module.exports = shape
  • There is no implicit way to refer to properties of the context object. The best you can do is the with statement, but it's got all sorts of problems and is best avoided. – Pointy May 25 '14 at 1:20
  • 5
    If you want public members of an object, they MUST be referenced from the this pointer. That's how OO works in Javascript. No alternative. If you have lots of references to the same variable within a function, you can temporarily put it in a local variable just to save some reference logic. – jfriend00 May 25 '14 at 1:20
  • @jfriend00, I'd be happy to accept this as an answer :) – user14742 May 25 '14 at 1:35
9

If you want public members of an object, they MUST be referenced from the this pointer. That's how OO works in Javascript. No alternative.

If you have lots of references to the same variable within a function, you can temporarily put it in a local variable just to save some reference logic (same as with any multiple step reference), but you will still have to initially retrieve using this.varName.


There is a scheme that uses "private" member variables in a constructor closure and does not use the prototype that can be used in some situations and this allows you to refer to the variables directly without this use of this:

function shape(smth) {
    var a = smth,
        b = 2,
        c = 3;

    this.doCalculus = function() {
        return a * b + c - (2 * (b + c) + a);
    }
}

module.exports = shape

For object types where you create lots of instances, this may consume a bit more memory because methods are not stored on a shared prototype, but are created separately for each instance. There are those who argue the difference in memory consumption is immaterial in most uses.

5

It's possible to avoid using this in the constructor, by using Object.create to create the prototype chain, then declaring your properties directly on the resulting object.

function Shape(smth) {
  var shape = Object.create(Shape.prototype);

  shape.a = smth;
  shape.b = 2;
  shape.c = 3;

  return shape;
}

This removes the need for this in your Shape function, meaning that we no longer need to call it with new either.

new Shape(1); // { a: 1, b: 2, c: 3, __proto__: Shape.prototype }
Shape(1);     // { a: 1, b: 2, c: 3, __proto__: Shape.prototype }

However, you'll still need to use this inside your prototype methods to refer to the correct instance.

2

You can avoid this like this:

function Shape(smth) {
    return {"a": smth, "b": 2, "c": 3 };
}

But a caveat I need to add is the returned object doesn't seem to play well with adding methods using Shape.prototype.methodname

So as far as I can work out, for the original example you would need to do:

function Shape(smth) {
    return {"a": smth, 
            "b": 2, 
            "c": 3,
            doCalculus: function () {
                return this.a * this.b + this.c - (2 * (this.b + this.c) + this.a);
            }
    }

So you've still ended up with this(es), and you've lost the advantages of separating methods under prototype. I've also tried to get jslint to pass my code without ticking the "Tolerate... this" box, but I've come to the conclusion it's much better to just use this. Everyone except Douglas Crockford seems to accept it as an integral part of javascript.

2

If you want to avoid "this", you can do it like this:

const shape = smth => {
      let a = smth,
          b = 2,
          c = 3;
      return {
        doCalculus: () => a * b + c - (2 * (b + c) + a)
      }
    }

    console.log(shape(2).doCalculus()); // -5
0

You can use the with statement, although it is highly unrecommended and will not work in strict mode.

function Shape(smth) {
    this.a = smth;
    this.b = 2;
    this.c = 3;
}

Shape.prototype.doCalculus = function () {
    with(this) {
        return a * b + c - (2 * (b + c) + a);
    }
};

console.log(new Shape(5).doCalculus());

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