471

How can I find out the size of a file I opened with an application written in C?

I would like to know the size because I want to put the content of the loaded file into a string, which I allocate using malloc().

Just writing malloc(10000*sizeof(char)); is IMHO a bad idea.

9
  • 47
    Note that sizeof(char) is 1, by definition. Commented Oct 29, 2009 at 13:44
  • 15
    Ya, but some esoteric platform's compiler might define char as 2 bytes - then the program allocates more than is necessary. One can never be too sure. Commented Jan 5, 2010 at 2:50
  • 39
    @George an "esoteric platform's compiler" where sizeof(char) != 1 is not a true C compiler. Even if a character is 32 bits, it will still return 1. Commented Dec 6, 2010 at 17:03
  • 28
    @George: The C (and C++) standard guarantees that sizeof(char)==1. See e.g.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/intrinsic-types.html#faq-26.1
    – sleske
    Commented Feb 8, 2011 at 13:40
  • 61
    I actually prefer malloc(x*sizeof(char)); to malloc(x); when allocating x characters. Yes, they always compile to the same thing, but I like consistency with other memory allocations.
    – moltenform
    Commented Apr 16, 2011 at 1:16

7 Answers 7

641

You need to seek to the end of the file and then ask for the position:

fseek(fp, 0L, SEEK_END);
sz = ftell(fp);

You can then seek back, e.g.:

fseek(fp, 0L, SEEK_SET);

or (if seeking to go to the beginning)

rewind(fp);
22
  • 13
    @camh - Thanks man. This comment solved a problem I had with a file sizing algorithm. For the record, one opens a file in binary mode by putting a 'b' at the end of fopen's mode string.
    – T.E.D.
    Commented May 18, 2010 at 10:42
  • 71
    Yo uh, use rewind before people forget what it means
    – bobobobo
    Commented Sep 23, 2011 at 16:55
  • 138
    Returns a signed int, so limited to 2 GB. But on the plus side your file could be negative 2 billion bytes long, and they are prepared for that.
    – Seth
    Commented Feb 13, 2012 at 21:07
  • 27
    length = lseek(fd, 0, SEEK_END)+1; Commented Nov 16, 2012 at 16:24
  • 30
    From fseek documentation "Library implementations are allowed to not meaningfully support SEEK_END (therefore, code using it has no real standard portability)." Commented Sep 2, 2013 at 10:43
458

Using standard library:

Assuming that your implementation meaningfully supports SEEK_END:

fseek(f, 0, SEEK_END); // seek to end of file
size = ftell(f); // get current file pointer
fseek(f, 0, SEEK_SET); // seek back to beginning of file
// proceed with allocating memory and reading the file

Linux/POSIX:

You can use stat (if you know the filename), or fstat (if you have the file descriptor).

Here is an example for stat:

#include <sys/stat.h>
struct stat st;
stat(filename, &st);
size = st.st_size;

Win32:

You can use GetFileSize or GetFileSizeEx.

15
  • 21
    Please note that I have omitted error checking in the interest of clarity. Commented Oct 26, 2008 at 21:23
  • 21
    You don't need the filename - you can use fstat for that.
    – Tanktalus
    Commented Oct 26, 2008 at 21:24
  • 4
    You need to point stat the address of the struct. The second line should be: stat(filename, &st); Commented Nov 3, 2009 at 21:16
  • 12
    I have omitted error checking in the interest of -FATAL ERROR, EXITING. Commented Feb 3, 2012 at 9:55
  • 12
    The second option is the only one that can show files sizes larger than 2GB
    – Seth
    Commented Feb 13, 2012 at 21:52
131

If you have the file descriptor fstat() returns a stat structure which contain the file size.

#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <unistd.h>

// fd = fileno(f); //if you have a stream (e.g. from fopen), not a file descriptor.
struct stat buf;
fstat(fd, &buf);
off_t size = buf.st_size;
7
  • 3
    Add "fd = fileno(f);" if you have a stream (e.g. from fopen), not a file descriptor. Needs error checking.
    – ysth
    Commented Oct 26, 2008 at 21:24
  • 18
    Of course it needs error checking - that would just complicate the example.
    – PiedPiper
    Commented Oct 26, 2008 at 21:28
  • 6
    this is in my opinion the best real answer, and i think we all have our training wheels off for the most part in C, do we really need error checking and other unnecessary code in our examples, its bad enough M$DN does it in theirs, lets not follow suit, instead just say at the end 'make sure to add error checking' and be done with it. Commented Nov 7, 2013 at 16:45
  • 19
    a LOT of the users of SO are students of C, not past masters. Therefore, the code given in the answers should show the error checking, so the student learns the right way to code. Commented Feb 23, 2015 at 18:30
  • 5
    there is the detail that (f)stat() returns the block allocation total bytes while fseek() / ftell() sequence returns the number of bytes before EOF is encountered. Commented Feb 23, 2015 at 18:32
28

I ended up just making a short and sweet fsize function(note, no error checking)

int fsize(FILE *fp){
    int prev=ftell(fp);
    fseek(fp, 0L, SEEK_END);
    int sz=ftell(fp);
    fseek(fp,prev,SEEK_SET); //go back to where we were
    return sz;
}

It's kind of silly that the standard C library doesn't have such a function, but I can see why it'd be difficult as not every "file" has a size(for instance /dev/null)

3
  • 3
    Good point for restoring previous position indicator of the file stream. Commented Jan 13, 2016 at 8:08
  • 2
    ftell(fp) returns long. No need to possible shorted to int and lose information. Commented Mar 20, 2021 at 17:53
  • 1
    For anyone seeing it here, you don't need ftell, lseek returns current position with one less syscall Commented Aug 19, 2023 at 13:17
20

How to use lseek/fseek/stat/fstat to get filesize ?

#include <fcntl.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>

void
fseek_filesize(const char *filename)
{
    FILE *fp = NULL;
    long off;

    fp = fopen(filename, "r");
    if (fp == NULL)
    {
        printf("failed to fopen %s\n", filename);
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }

    if (fseek(fp, 0, SEEK_END) == -1)
    {
        printf("failed to fseek %s\n", filename);
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }

    off = ftell(fp);
    if (off == -1)
    {
        printf("failed to ftell %s\n", filename);
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }

    printf("[*] fseek_filesize - file: %s, size: %ld\n", filename, off);

    if (fclose(fp) != 0)
    {
        printf("failed to fclose %s\n", filename);
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }
}

void
fstat_filesize(const char *filename)
{
    int fd;
    struct stat statbuf;

    fd = open(filename, O_RDONLY, S_IRUSR | S_IRGRP);
    if (fd == -1)
    {
        printf("failed to open %s\n", filename);
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }

    if (fstat(fd, &statbuf) == -1)
    {
        printf("failed to fstat %s\n", filename);
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }

    printf("[*] fstat_filesize - file: %s, size: %lld\n", filename, statbuf.st_size);

    if (close(fd) == -1)
    {
        printf("failed to fclose %s\n", filename);
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }
}

void
stat_filesize(const char *filename)
{
    struct stat statbuf;

    if (stat(filename, &statbuf) == -1)
    {
        printf("failed to stat %s\n", filename);
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }

    printf("[*] stat_filesize - file: %s, size: %lld\n", filename, statbuf.st_size);

}

void
seek_filesize(const char *filename)
{
    int fd;
    off_t off;

    if (filename == NULL)
    {
        printf("invalid filename\n");
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }

    fd = open(filename, O_RDONLY, S_IRUSR | S_IRGRP);
    if (fd == -1)
    {
        printf("failed to open %s\n", filename);
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }

    off = lseek(fd, 0, SEEK_END);
    if (off == -1)
    {
        printf("failed to lseek %s\n", filename);
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }

    printf("[*] seek_filesize - file: %s, size: %lld\n", filename, (long long) off);

    if (close(fd) == -1)
    {
        printf("failed to close %s\n", filename);
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }
}

int
main(int argc, const char *argv[])
{
    int i;

    if (argc < 2)
    {
        printf("%s <file1> <file2>...\n", argv[0]);
        exit(0);
    }

    for(i = 1; i < argc; i++)
    {
        seek_filesize(argv[i]);
        stat_filesize(argv[i]);
        fstat_filesize(argv[i]);
        fseek_filesize(argv[i]);
    }

    return 0;
}
5
  • 1
    or if(off == (-1L)) no need for (long)
    – Imobilis
    Commented Jun 1, 2018 at 0:45
  • ftell returns a long, unfortunately. You need ftello to return an off_t. (Or apparently on Windows, _ftelli64(), because it seems they love to make it harder to write portable code.) See discussion on another answer Commented Nov 25, 2021 at 11:33
  • 1
    fstat only makes sense if you already have an open file, or as part of the process of opening it. Your fstat_filesize isn't something you'd ever want to use in that form, only if you were going to actually keep that fd around and read from it or something. open/fstat/close has zero advantage over stat; I'd have written that function to take a FILE *fp (use fileno()) or int fd. I guess your functions aren't intended to be used as-is because they only printf the results instead of returning them, though. Commented Nov 25, 2021 at 11:38
  • 1
    Also, since you're not passing O_CREAT to open, the 3rd arg is unused. S_IRUSR | S_IRGRP is not meaningful there. If open was going to create the file, that would give it 0440 aka r--r----- permissions (which would stop anything else from opening and writing to it), but it won't without O_CREAT so the int open(const char *pathname, int flags); form of the prototype applies. man7.org/linux/man-pages/man2/open.2.html Commented Nov 25, 2021 at 11:42
  • Other than the design of fstat_filesize, yeah this is a useful example of how to do error checking. Except you should fprintf(stderr, ... with your error messages. And in the functions using POSIX stat and friends, you should be using strerror as part of that to get an actual reason for the failure, like "no such file or directory" for ENOENT or "Permission Denied" for EPERM. That's much more useful and the standard way to report errors in Unix programs. (System call and file name is better than nothing, the user might not be thinking of permissions if you don't tell them.) Commented Nov 25, 2021 at 12:02
9

Have you considered not computing the file size and just growing the array if necessary? Here's an example (with error checking ommitted):

#define CHUNK 1024

/* Read the contents of a file into a buffer.  Return the size of the file 
 * and set buf to point to a buffer allocated with malloc that contains  
 * the file contents.
 */
int read_file(FILE *fp, char **buf) 
{
  int n, np;
  char *b, *b2;

  n = CHUNK;
  np = n;
  b = malloc(sizeof(char)*n);
  while ((r = fread(b, sizeof(char), CHUNK, fp)) > 0) {
    n += r;
    if (np - n < CHUNK) { 
      np *= 2;                      // buffer is too small, the next read could overflow!
      b2 = malloc(np*sizeof(char));
      memcpy(b2, b, n * sizeof(char));
      free(b);
      b = b2;
    }
  }
  *buf = b;
  return n;
}

This has the advantage of working even for streams in which it is impossible to get the file size (like stdin).

5
  • 19
    Maybe the realloc function could be used here instead of using an intermediate pointer and having to free(). Commented Mar 13, 2011 at 0:53
  • This has the very real disadvantage of being O(n^2) ... the size of the thing you have to copy grows. OK for small files, TERRIBLE for big ones. If you have a 1k chunk and a 100M file, you end up copying (if I did my math right) roughly 1E17 bytes. That may be a pathological example, but it demonstrates why you should not do this.
    – Floris
    Commented Jan 27, 2016 at 21:19
  • 3
    Unless I am misreading, the size being stored into doubles each time. The run-time is therefore O(n) rather than O(n^2). This is the same allocation strategy that is typically used for std::vector and its ilk. Regardless, reallocations are still less efficient than querying the file size and reading all at once.
    – Joe
    Commented Apr 19, 2016 at 2:48
  • This is doubling on each reallocation. Any constant factor resize greater than one is sufficient to get the O(n) bound, literal doubling is maybe overkill, to scale by 1.75 e.g. use np += (np / 2) + (np / 4); - all integer, intermediate results don't overflow "early". I'd more likely use 1.5, but 1.75 shows the idea better. Of course watch out for overflow, and particularly any multiple of the previous size may overflow when the actual size doesn't. If your file size is (2^31)-1, this will probably attempt to allocate a buffer with -(2^31) rather than 2^31 bytes.
    – user180247
    Commented Nov 13, 2016 at 17:19
  • I should probably warn that np += (np / 2) + (np / 4) doesn't give an exact multiply by 1.75 - results can be too small because no carry propagates from bits that were truncated away - but it should be good enough for this purpose. For multiplying by 1.5, np += (np / 2); should be correct.
    – user180247
    Commented Nov 13, 2016 at 17:50
8

If you're on Linux, seriously consider just using the g_file_get_contents function from glib. It handles all the code for loading a file, allocating memory, and handling errors.

6
  • 44
    If you're on Linux and want to have a dependency on glib, that is.
    – JesperE
    Commented Oct 26, 2008 at 22:25
  • 2
    Not that bad of a problem, as glib is used by both GTK and KDE applications now. It's also available on Mac OS X and Windows, but it's not nearly as standard there.
    – Ben Combee
    Commented Oct 29, 2008 at 19:23
  • 1
    But is not glib a c++ library? The question stipulated C Commented Jun 21, 2013 at 9:54
  • 5
    @DaveAppleton: No, glib is very much a plain C library, not C++.
    – Nate C-K
    Commented Feb 20, 2014 at 4:13
  • @BenCombee glib's not on android, last I checked.
    – Wyatt Ward
    Commented May 1, 2017 at 4:40

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