57

I'm looking for the opposite to this Q&A: Convert an excel or spreadsheet column letter to its number in Pythonic fashion.

or this one but in python How to convert a column number (eg. 127) into an excel column (eg. AA)

2
  • did u try that in python May 26, 2014 at 2:32
  • @sundar nataraj サンダーナタラジ i sure did. I tried the code here: bytes.com/topic/python/answers/45129-convert-numbers-letters . I tried a few examples in there. But since the site is so horribly organized. I can't figure what code works and doesn't. Even people getting answers on that page can't figure it out.
    – jason
    May 26, 2014 at 2:47

19 Answers 19

111
start_index = 1   #  it can start either at 0 or at 1
letter = ''
while column_int > 25 + start_index:   
    letter += chr(65 + int((column_int-start_index)/26) - 1)
    column_int = column_int - (int((column_int-start_index)/26))*26
letter += chr(65 - start_index + (int(column_int)))
6
  • 1
    Any idea how that example can be modified for a zero rather than 1-based solution? A -> 0, B -> 1 .... my modification so far: n += 1before the while loop
    – RandomDude
    Nov 2, 2017 at 16:00
  • Starting with n += 1 is probably the simplest way to do it. There's no symbol for "0", so it's not a normal base 26 system. In base ten, "20" represents 2*10+0*1. In the spreadsheet, you can't represent 2*26+0*1. You have to use 1*26+26*1, which is "AZ". See paradise.caltech.edu/ist4/lectures/… Nov 22, 2019 at 0:07
  • 3
    Strings are immutable, thus, prepending to a string is expensive since everything must move. Consider using a mutable alternative like a list and converting to string "".join(lst)
    – Brayoni
    May 6, 2020 at 7:17
  • 1
    for column_int = 4000 it gives me ÙV what is rather unusual :) Nov 15, 2022 at 17:23
  • Yes, this one only works until ZZ, and then it breaks down.
    – egor83
    Dec 25, 2022 at 3:58
59

The xlsxwriter library includes a conversion function, xlsxwriter.utility.xl_col_to_name(index) and is on github

here is a working example:

>>> import xlsxwriter 
>>> xlsxwriter.utility.xl_col_to_name(10)
'K'
>>> xlsxwriter.utility.xl_col_to_name(1)
'B'
>>> xlsxwriter.utility.xl_col_to_name(0)
'A'

Notice that it's using zero-indexing.

5
  • 7
    This library is great, it's a good idea to use a well know working library instead of custom code
    – rebrec
    Aug 7, 2015 at 14:23
  • +1 , but xlsxwriter.utility.xl_col_to_name(28) is giving AC instead of AB, By subtracting input number with 1 it is giving expected output as AB, but do you know why it is happening Sep 27, 2016 at 13:11
  • 4
    @akashkarothiya xlsxwriter uses 0-based indexing (as does python)
    – Dnaiel
    May 3, 2017 at 12:19
  • 1
    Also the xlrd library has a conversion function: xlrd.formula.colname(0) returns 'A' Jun 23, 2019 at 16:50
  • It breaks after 99104947832496131. Any number higher and it becomes inaccurate. Dec 25, 2023 at 12:21
37

The openpyxl library includes the conversion function (amongst others) which you are looking for, get_column_letter:

>>> from openpyxl.utils.cell import get_column_letter
>>> get_column_letter(1)
'A'
>>> get_column_letter(10)
'J'
>>> get_column_letter(3423)
'EAQ'
0
19

My recipe for this was inspired by another answer on arbitrary base conversion (https://stackoverflow.com/a/24763277/3163607)

def n2a(n):
    d, m = divmod(n,26) # 26 is the number of ASCII letters
    return '' if n < 0 else n2a(d-1)+chr(m+65) # chr(65) = 'A'

Example:

print (-1,n2a(-1))
print (0,n2a(0))
for i in range(23,30):
    print (i,n2a(i))

outputs

-1
0 A
23 X
24 Y
25 Z
26 AA
27 AB
28 AC
29 AD

EDIT: I added n2a(0) to clarify that it is zero-based. I also changed the function a little to avoid infinite recursion if given a negative number.

2
  • 1
    Concise and zero-based!
    – Wayne
    Feb 23, 2022 at 3:59
  • 2
    Be aware that this indexing is zero-based!
    – Asclepius
    Sep 17, 2022 at 17:13
10

Edited after some tough love from Meta

The procedure for this involves dividing the number by 26 until you've reached a number less than 26, taking the remainder each time and adding 65, since 65 is where 'A' is in the ASCII table. Read up on ASCII if that doesn't make sense to you.

Note that like the originally linked question, this is 1-based rather than zero-based, so A -> 1, B -> 2.

def num_to_col_letters(num):
    letters = ''
    while num:
        mod = (num - 1) % 26
        letters += chr(mod + 65)
        num = (num - 1) // 26
    return ''.join(reversed(letters))

Example output:

for i in range(1, 53):
    print(i, num_to_col_letters(i))
1 A
2 B
3 C
4 D
...
25 Y
26 Z
27 AA
28 AB
29 AC
...
47 AU
48 AV
49 AW
50 AX
51 AY
52 AZ
8
  • 5
    This gives wrong output for num_to_col_letters(26) it outputs "A@"
    – jspurim
    May 26, 2014 at 3:30
  • 1
    I saw the edit proposed by @coldfix - this answer doesn't work and a working version was proposed in good faith as an edit. For full disclosure: I wasn't sure how to deal with that and asked this question on meta about it. Anyway - my recommendation is that the edit would be better added as a new answer - or that the original answer should have a look at that edit and decide whether to change this answer. Mar 20, 2015 at 16:31
  • 1
    P.S. The answer by @user1344186 works on these edge cases properly using a similar approach. Mar 20, 2015 at 16:34
  • 2
    @JRichardSnape I agree that my answer is basically broken and the edit more or less provides a brand new algorithm rather than fixing minor problems with mine.
    – Marius
    Mar 21, 2015 at 0:12
  • 2
    @jason_cant_code still seems to be active on the site so maybe they can be persuaded to switch the accepted answer.
    – Marius
    Mar 21, 2015 at 0:13
9

Just for people still interest in this. The chosen answer by @Marius gives wrong outputs in some cases, as commented by @jspurim. Here is the my answer.

import string
def convertToTitle(num):
    title = ''
    alist = string.uppercase
    while num:
        mod = (num-1) % 26
        num = int((num - mod) / 26)  
        title += alist[mod]
    return title[::-1]
5

Recursive one line solution w/o libraries

def column(num, res = ''):
   return column((num - 1) // 26, 'ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ'[(num - 1) % 26] + res) if num > 0 else res
3

Recursive Implementation

import string
def spreadsheet_column_encoding_reverse_recursive(x):
    def converter(x):
        return (
            ""
            if x == 0
            else converter((x - 1) // 26) + string.ascii_uppercase[(x - 1) % 26]
        )

    return converter(x)

Iterative Implementations

Version 1: uses chr, ord

def spreadsheet_column_encoding_reverse_iterative(x):
    s = list()

    while x:
        x -= 1
        s.append(chr(ord("A") + x % 26))
        x //= 26

    return "".join(reversed(s))

Version 2: Uses string.ascii_uppercase

import string
def spreadsheet_column_encoding_reverse_iterative(x):
    s = list()

    while x:
        x -= 1
        s.append(string.ascii_uppercase[x % 26])
        x //= 26

    return "".join(reversed(s))

Version 3: Uses divmod, chr, ord

def spreadsheet_column_encoding_reverse_iterative(x):
    s = list()

    while x:
        x, remainder = divmod(x - 1, 26)
        s.append(chr(ord("A") + remainder))

    return "".join(reversed(s))
2
def _column(aInt):
    return chr((aInt - 1) // 26 + 64) + chr((aInt - 1) % 26 + 1 + 64) if aInt > 26 else chr(aInt + 64)
    
print _column(1)
print _column(27)
print _column(50)
print _column(100)
print _column(260)
print _column(270)

Output: A AA AX CV IZ JJ

1

This simple Python function works for columns with 1 or 2 letters.

def let(num):       

alphabeth = string.uppercase
na = len(alphabeth)

if num <= len(alphabeth):
    letters = alphabeth[num-1]
else:
    letters = alphabeth[ ((num-1) / na) - 1 ] +  alphabeth[((num-1) % na)]            

return letters
1
import gspread

def letter2num(col_letter: str) -> int:
    row_num, col_num = gspread.utils.a1_to_rowcol(col_letter + '1')
    return col_num


def num2letter(col_num: int) -> str:
    return gspread.utils.rowcol_to_a1(1, col_num)[:-1]


# letter2num('D') => returns 4
# num2letter(4) => returns 'D'
1

Here is a recursive solution:

def column_num_to_string(n):
    n, rem = divmod(n - 1, 26)
    char = chr(65 + rem)
    if n:
        return column_num_to_string(n) + char
    else:
        return char

column_num_to_string(28)
#output: 'AB'

The inverse can also be defined recursively, in a similar way:

def column_string_to_num(s):
    n = ord(s[-1]) - 64
    if s[:-1]:
        return 26 * (column_string_to_num(s[:-1])) + n
    else:
        return n
    
column_string_to_num("AB")
#output: 28
1

Using xlsxwriter

import gspread
import numpy as np
import xlsxwriter

.....You code.......

array = np.array(wks.get_all_values())


row_count = 0
col_count = 0
for a in array:
    col_count = 0
    row_count += 1
    for b in a:
        col_count += 1
        print(f"{xlsxwriter.utility.xl_col_to_name(col_count-1)}{row_count} {str(b)}")
0

Just to complicate everything a little bit I added caching, so the name of the same column will be calculated only once. The solution is based on a recipe by @Alex Benfica

import string


class ColumnName(dict):
    def __init__(self):
        super(ColumnName, self).__init__()
        self.alphabet = string.uppercase
        self.alphabet_size = len(self.alphabet)

    def __missing__(self, column_number):
        ret = self[column_number] = self.get_column_name(column_number)
        return ret

    def get_column_name(self, column_number):
        if column_number <= self.alphabet_size:
            return self.alphabet[column_number - 1]
        else:
            return self.alphabet[((column_number - 1) / self.alphabet_size) - 1] + self.alphabet[((column_number - 1) % self.alphabet_size)]

Usage example:

column = ColumnName()

for cn in range(1, 40):
    print column[cn]

for cn in range(1, 50):
    print column[cn]
1
  • A couple issues with this implementation: it accepts negative numbers, where intuitively it should error; it fails on columns of three or more characters (eg column[703] should be AAA)
    – kevinsa5
    Feb 16, 2018 at 14:57
0
import math

num = 3500
row_number = str(math.ceil(num / 702))
letters = ''
num = num - 702 * math.floor(num / 702)
while num:
    mod = (num - 1) % 26
    letters += chr(mod + 65)
    num = (num - 1) // 26
result = row_number + ("".join(reversed(letters)))
print(result)
1
  • this will give valid results for column[703] and further Oct 15, 2019 at 2:57
0

an easy to understand solution:

def gen_excel_column_name(col_idx, dict_size=26):
    """generate column name for excel

    Args:
        col_idx (int): column index, 1 based.
        dict_size (int, optional): NO. of letters to use. Defaults to 26 (A~Z).

    Returns:
        str: column name. e.g. A, B, C, AA, AB, AC
    """
    if col_idx < 1:
        return ''
    
    # determine how many letters in the result
    l = 1  # length of result
    capcity = dict_size  # number of patterns when length is l
    while col_idx > capcity:
        col_idx -= capcity
        l += 1
        capcity *= dict_size

    res = []
    col_idx -= 1 # now col_idx is a dict_size system. when dict_size = 3, l = 2,  col_idx=2 means 02, col_idx=3 means 10 
    while col_idx > 0:
        d = col_idx % dict_size
        res.append(d)
        col_idx = col_idx // dict_size
    # padding leading zeros
    while len(res) < l:
        res.append(0)

    # change digits to letters and reverse
    res = [chr(65 + d) for d in reversed(res)]
    return ''.join(res)

for i in range(1, 42):
    print(i, gen_excel_column_name(i, 3))

part of the output:

1 A
2 B
3 C
4 AA
5 AB
6 AC
7 BA
8 BB
9 BC
10 CA
11 CB
12 CC
13 AAA
14 AAB
15 AAC
16 ABA
17 ABB
18 ABC
19 ACA
20 ACB
21 ACC
22 BAA
23 BAB
24 BAC
25 BBA
26 BBB
27 BBC
28 BCA
29 BCB
30 BCC
31 CAA
32 CAB
33 CAC
34 CBA
35 CBB
36 CBC
37 CCA
38 CCB
39 CCC
40 AAAA
41 AAAB
0

Here is a modified version of the accepted answer that won't break after ZZ.

  • It uses a single while loop and the divmod() function to simplify the calculations.
  • start_index can be 0 or 1.
  • The divmod() function returns both the quotient and the remainder when dividing two numbers, which in this case are column_int - start_index and 26.
  • The remainder is used to generate the next character for the column name, and the quotient is used as the new column_int for the next iteration.
  • The loop continues until column_int becomes zero.
def int_to_excel_column(column_int, start_index):
    
    letter = ''

    while column_int > 0:
        column_int, remainder = divmod(column_int - start_index, 26)
        letter = chr(65 + remainder) + letter

    return letter

Example:

column_name = int_to_excel_column(28)  # Output: 'AB'
column_name = int_to_excel_column(703)  # Output: 'AAA'
0

For those looking for a solution that works for any integer number.

def interger_to_letter(column_int):
    start_index = 0
    column_int = column_int + start_index - 1
    letter = ""
    if column_int < 0: 
        return letter
    
    char = 0
    while column_int >= 0:
        mod = column_int%26**(char+1) + 1
        letter = chr(int(mod/26**(char)) + 64) + letter
        column_int -= mod
        char += 1
        if column_int == 0:
            break
        
    return letter
0

Try this:

def n2c(n):
    return chr(n + 64) if n <= 26 else n2c((n - n % 26) // 26) + n2c(n % 26)

Examples:

print(n2c(17))  # Q
print(n2c(55))  # BC
print(n2c(165))  # FI
print(n2c(4999165))  # JXKEO

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