18

I recently saw the following C++ code-snippet

template <class B>
class A : public B
{
   ...
};

and I am wondering in which setting such a design is good practice?

The way I understand it, is that having the superclass as a template parameter allows users of A to choose a superclass when instantiating an object of A.

But if this is the case, wouldn't it be better to have a common superclass C for all the classes (B) which are used as the template argument and have A extend C ?

  • Usually it's done the other way round. But the pattern you show, can be used for policy or interface injection. – πάντα ῥεῖ May 26 '14 at 11:11
  • I wonder if the close-voter for "Too Broad" understands his choice. – Sebastian Mach May 26 '14 at 11:18
  • 1
    @πάντα ῥεῖ: Design Patterns are not about concrete use cases. – Sebastian Mach May 26 '14 at 11:25
  • 2
    @user695652 it shouldn't, you have my reopen vote if it does get closed. – Luchian Grigore May 26 '14 at 11:36
  • 2
    @πάνταῥεῖ: Design patterns don't have motivation sections. Books or articles about them have, but not them. Are you implying that every abstract question lacking an example is too broad? Actually, I sometimes receive wrong answers to my questions because I added examples; i.e. I get answers targetting my examples instead of the question, so skipping an example is sometimes actually better. – Sebastian Mach May 26 '14 at 11:36
13

It's often used to realize static polymorphism.

Use cases are:

In general you have the benefits from dynamic polymorphism, without the extra runtime costs of virtual functions. But it's only useful if the concrete type can be determined at compile time.

  • May be worth a note that CRTP does it just the other way round as the OP's sample shows. – πάντα ῥεῖ May 26 '14 at 16:16
4

Sounds like a good candidate for a wrapper class:

class base {
public:
  virtual void f() = 0;
};

class d1 : public base {
public:
  virtual void f() override { ... };
};

class d2 : public base {
public:
  virtual void f() override { ... };
};

template <typename T>
class wrapper : public T {
public:
  virtual void f() override {
    pre_op();
    T::f();
    post_op();
  }

private:
  void pre_op() { ... }
  void post_op() { ... }
}

int main(int, char**) {
  wrapper<d1> w1;
}

For example, the wrapper class can provide synchronized access to the derived classes.

  • 2
    It seems to be some kind of waste to both inherit and have a member of the same type, why not just call the parent member function T::f() ? – Drax May 26 '14 at 12:45
  • 1
    @Drax fixd, thx! – vz0 May 26 '14 at 13:06
1

It is used frequently in the so called "policy-based" design, i.e. you add characteristics to a base class by composition with desired derived classes, see "Modern C++ Design: Generic Programming and Design Patterns Applied" by Andrei Alexandrescu. The instantiated template class from which you derive is called the "policy". Such a design is sometimes better than inheritance, as it allows to combine policies and avoid a combinatorial explosion inevitable in the inheritance-based model.

See for example the following simple code, where RED and BLUE are drawing policies for a Pen:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

struct RED
{
    std::string getColor()
    {
        return "RED";
    }
};

struct BLUE
{
    std::string getColor()
    {
        return "BLUE";
    }
};

template <typename PolicyClass>
class Pencil: public PolicyClass
{
public:
    void Draw()
    {
        std::cout << "I draw with the color " << PolicyClass::getColor() << std::endl; 
    }
};


int main()
{   
    Pencil<RED> red_pencil; // Drawing with RED
    red_pencil.Draw();
    Pencil<BLUE> blue_pencil; // Different behaviour now
    blue_pencil.Draw();

    return 0;
}

Can read a bit more here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Policy-based_design

  • Good point, but your example doesn't justify the inheritance. It could be composition. – erenon May 26 '14 at 13:12
  • @erenon This was a simple example, but in more realistic scenarios you want to write your base class so that it works with any policy, that's why (in my understanding), you inherit from a template class. Otherwise, you would have to specifically inherit the desired policies, i.e. create a different class for each possible combinations of policies. Using templates, you define a single (templated) base class, and the code becomes more elegant and much more easier to maintain (e.g. can inherit from the Base template class, otherwise you'd have to inherit from each possible policy combinations). – vsoftco May 26 '14 at 13:29
1

A place where I use this style was where I need to implement a generic graph library which is both easy to use and also easy to maintain After a while I came with this design :

ABstract class for GraphContainer,Edge,Node :

template < class T1,class T2>
class  GraphAbstractContainer
{
public:
    using Node = T1;
    using Edge = T2;
    virtual std::list<Node> getConnectedNodes(const Node& node)const = 0;
    virtual Node addNode(const Node&) = 0;
    //...
};

class  GraphAbstracthNode
{
public:
    virtual uint32_t getId() const = 0;
    virtual void setID(uint32_t id)=0;
    //..
};

template<class T>
class  GraphAbstractEdge
{
public:
    using Node = T;
    //GraphAbstractEdge(){}
    virtual Node  firstNode() const = 0;
    virtual Node   secondNode() const = 0;
    virtual void  setFirstNode(const Node& node)  = 0;
    virtual void  setSecondNode(const Node& node) = 0;
    //...

};

Then I add Adj_List and Adj Matrix implementation by inheriting directly from template parametrs .

for example My Adj List classess looks some thing like this :

template<class T1 = GraphAbstractContainer<GraphAdjNode,
                   GraphAdjEdge>>
class  GraphAdjListContainer : public T1
{
public:
    using Node = typename T1::Node;
    using Edge = typename T1::Edge;

    //return connected Nodes
    virtual std::list<Node> getConnectedNodes(const Node& node) const
    {
        //..
    }
    //..
  };

};

template<class T>
class  GraphAdjNode : public T
{
public:
    //implementing abstract class methods...
};

template<class T>
class  GraphAdjEdge : public T
{
public:
   //...

};

And also My Graph class inherit directly from template too :

template<class GraphContainer=GraphAdjListContainer<>>
    class   Graph :public  GraphContainer
    {
    public:
        using Node = typename GraphContainer::Node;
        using Edge = typename GraphContainer::Edge;
         //...

}

An advantage for this design pattern is you can simply change the whole class underlying's stuffs by just inherit from abstract classes and fill the template parametrs.

for example I define Trie data structure by simply doing this :

class TrieNode :public GraphAdjNode
{
public:
    //...
    std::string word_;
};

class Trie 
{
public:
    using Graph = Graph < ecv::GraphAdjListContainer<TrieNode, ecv::GraphAdjListEdge<TrieNode>>>;
    using Node =  Graph::Node;
    using Edge =  Graph::Edge;
    void addWord(wstring word);
    //...
private:
    Graph graph_;
}

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