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This question already has an answer here:

As I have learned, one can write the following code:

char *a = new char[50];
for (int i = 0; i < 50; ++i) {
    i[a] = '5';
}

It compiles. It works. It does exactly the same as

char *a = new char[50];
for (int i = 0; i < 50; ++i) {
    a[i] = '5';
}

Is it just because:

  • a[b] is implemented as a macro *(a + b) by default and the fact that both code samples are valid is just an accident/compiler specific
  • it's standardized somewhere and the outcome of such algorithms should be the same on every platform

It is reasonable to assume that addition should be commutative, but if we implement operator[] in that way, we have made something else commutative, what might not be what we wanted.

The interesting fact is that there is no pointer[pointer] operator, so operator[] is not a macro.

I know it's bad. I know it's confusing the people who read the code. But I want to know if it's just an accident and it will not work in a distant land where unicorns have seven legs and horns are on their left cheek.

marked as duplicate by πάντα ῥεῖ, Raymond Chen, Blastfurnace, stefan, fredoverflow c++ May 26 '14 at 17:37

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    It's not a macro, it's a language rule. – stefan May 26 '14 at 14:48
  • I removed the C tag, since this seems rather C++-focused. – unwind May 26 '14 at 14:49
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    @Cool_Coder: It works because a[i] == *(a + i) == *(i + a) == i[a] – Blastfurnace May 26 '14 at 14:53
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    @Cool_Coder Just forget it. Anyone accessing first element in an array like this 0[a] should be shot as soon as it is discovered. The only use of it is code obfuscation. – BЈовић May 26 '14 at 14:54
12

C++ standard, § 8.3.4, note 7 (page 185) (emphasis mine).

Except where it has been declared for a class (13.5.5), the subscript operator [] is interpreted in such a way that E1[E2] is identical to *((E1)+(E2)). Because of the conversion rules that apply to +, if E1 is an array and E2 an integer, then E1[E2] refers to the E2-th member of E1. Therefore, despite its asymmetric appearance, subscripting is a commutative operation.

4

Here is what C++11 standard has to say:

Note: Except where it has been declared for a class (13.5.5), the subscript operator [] is interpreted in such a way that E1[E2] is identical to *((E1)+(E2)). Because of the conversion rules that apply to +, if E1 is an array and E2 an integer, then E1[E2] refers to the E2-th member of E1. Therefore, despite its asymmetric appearance, subscripting is a commutative operation. (emphasis is added).

So your assumption that a[b] is implemented as *(a + b) is correct, except that it is implemented directly in the compiler, not as a macro.

1

The expression E1[E2] is identical (by definition) to *((E1)+(E2))

...and then commutativity of index and pointer takes hold. See your friendly neighbourhood C++ standard, section 5.2.1 in this version: http://www.open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg21/docs/papers/2012/n3485.pdf

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