86
votes

Inspired by http://xkcd.com/710/ here is a code golf for it.

The Challenge

Given a positive integer greater than 0, print out the hailstone sequence for that number.

The Hailstone Sequence

See Wikipedia for more detail..

  • If the number is even, divide it by two.
  • If the number is odd, triple it and add one.

Repeat this with the number produced until it reaches 1. (if it continues after 1, it will go in an infinite loop of 1 -> 4 -> 2 -> 1...)

Sometimes code is the best way to explain, so here is some from Wikipedia

function collatz(n)
  show n
  if n > 1
    if n is odd
      call collatz(3n + 1)
    else
      call collatz(n / 2)

This code works, but I am adding on an extra challenge. The program must not be vulnerable to stack overflows. So it must either use iteration or tail recursion.

Also, bonus points for if it can calculate big numbers and the language does not already have it implemented. (or if you reimplement big number support using fixed-length integers)

Test case

Number: 21
Results: 21 -> 64 -> 32 -> 16 -> 8 -> 4 -> 2 -> 1

Number: 3
Results: 3 -> 10 -> 5 -> 16 -> 8 -> 4 -> 2 -> 1

Also, the code golf must include full user input and output.

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  • 4
  • 20
    must not be vulnerable to stack overflows : You should not have posted it here then! ;) – Felix Kling Mar 5 '10 at 16:35
  • 51
    My friends stopped calling me, does that mean I solved the problem? – Martin Mar 5 '10 at 16:38
  • 18
    You're on SO, but once had friends? ... what was that like? – Pops Mar 5 '10 at 17:11
  • 5
    The assembler answer is cool, but it's a bit anti-code-golf to select the longest answer! – John La Rooy Mar 6 '10 at 6:30

70 Answers 70

0
votes

Erlang, 120 chars

-module (f).
-export ([f/1]).
f(1)->1;
f(N)->
    io:format("~p ",[N]),
    if N rem 2 =:= 0
        ->f(trunc(N/2));
        true->f(3*N+1)
end.

test:

f:f(171).

171 514 257 772 386 193 580 290 145 436 218 109 328 164 82 41 124 62 31 94 47 
142 71 214 107 322 161 484 242 121 364 182 91 274 137 412 206 103 310 155 466 
233 700 350 175 526 263 790 395 1186 593 1780 890 445 1336 668 334 167 502 251 
754 377 1132 566 283 850 425 1276 638 319 958 479 1438 719 2158 1079 3238 1619 
4858 2429 7288 3644 1822 911 2734 1367 4102 2051 6154 3077 9232 4616 2308 1154 
577 1732 866 433 1300 650 325 976 488 244 122 61 184 92 46 23 70 35 106 53 160 
80 40 20 10 5 16 8 4 2 1
0
votes

Josl - 58 characters

This version will not stack overflow due to tail recursion.

c dup println dup 1 > if dup odd? if 3 * 1+ else 2 / end c

Use:

main 21 c

Or, other examples:

main 
  21 c
  63,728,127 c
0
votes

Clojure - 70 chars

((fn[n](prn n)(if(> n 1)(recur(if(odd? n)(+(* 3 n)1)(/ n 2)))))(read))

Or, with proper whitespace and indentation:

((fn [n]
  (prn n)
  (if (> n 1)
    (recur
      (if (odd? n)
        (+ (* 3 n) 1)
        (/ n 2)))))
  (read))

recur forces Clojure to use tail call recursion, so no stack overflows. Works with arbitrarily big numbers. Includes input and output, although it will crash if you enter a non-number :).


Note: shortly after posting my answer I noticed another Clojure implementation with pretty much the same algorithm. However, since that one doesn't attempt to be short, I'll leave my answer here, for what it's worth.

0
votes

Grooovy - 59 chars

int n=args[0] as int
while(n>1){println n=n%2==0?n/2:n*3+1}

Example

$ ./collatz.groovy 5
16
8
4
2
1

With prettier output (66 chars)

int n=args[0] as int
while(n>1){print " -> ${n=n%2==0?n/2:n*3+1}"}

Example

$ ./collatz.groovy 5
-> 16 -> 8 -> 4 -> 2 -> 1
0
votes

J, 31 characters

-:`(>:@(3&*))`1:@.(1&=+2&|)^:a:

Usage:

-:`(>:@(3&*))`1:@.(1&=+2&|)^:a: 9
9 28 14 7 22 11 34 17 52 26 13 40 20 10 5 16 8 4 2 1
0
votes

Common Lisp, 76 74 chars

(defun c(n)(if (eql n 1)'(1)(cons n(if(oddp n)(c(1+(* 3 n)))(c(/ n 2))))))

or, written properly,

(defun collatz (n)
  (if (eql n 1)
      '(1)
    (cons n (if (oddp n)
                (collatz (1+ (* 3 n)))
                (collatz (/ n 2))))))
0
votes

Smalltalk, 103 characters

[:n||l|l:=OrderedCollection with:1.[n>1]whileTrue:[l addLast:n.n:=n odd ifTrue:[3*n+1]ifFalse:[n/2]].l]

Call by sending it the message #value: with the desired parameter:

[:n||l|l:=OrderedCollection with:1.[n>1]whileTrue:[l addLast:n.n:=n odd ifTrue:[3*n+1]ifFalse:[n/2]].l] value: 123

Or, more sanely:

[:n | | result |
        result := OrderedCollection with: 1.
        [n > 1] whileTrue: [
                result addLast: n.
                n := n odd ifTrue: [3*n + 1] ifFalse: [n / 2]].
        result] value: 123

(The Proper Way would be to define the above as a method on Integer so you'd say "123 collatz", rather than as an anonymous closure.)

0
votes

Ruby 55 chars

n=gets.to_i
while(n>1) do n=((n%2)==1)?3*n+1:n/2;p n end
0
votes

Perl, 59 Chars

$n=shift;for($i=1;$n>1;$i++){$n=$n%2==0?$n/2:$n*3+1;printf"%002s: %s\n",$i,$n;}

However, I like this version at 79 chars (not counting whitespace) better because it prints the line number and the iteration value:

$n = shift; for($i = 1; $n > 1; $i++){ $n = $n % 2 == 0 ? $n / 2 : $n*3 + 1; printf "%002s: %s\n", $i, $n;}

$n = shift; 

for($i = 1; $n > 1; $i++){ 
    $n = $n % 2 == 0 ? $n / 2 : $n*3 + 1; 
    printf "%002s: %s\n", $i, $n;
}
-6
votes

Using an extension of HQ9+ (that I haven't written yet), called HQ9+C where C prints the Collatz Sequence on a number taken from stdin.

C

:P

  • 10
    Why does someone do this every code golf? It was funny once. – snicker Mar 5 '10 at 23:26
  • 1
    I'm sorry that I haven't memorized the entirety of StackOverflow like you apparently have. – Robert Davis Mar 6 '10 at 0:11
  • 1
    Some [] jokes are funny once. Do it once, you're a wit; do it twice you're a half-wit. -Robert Heinlein in the voice of Manny – dmckee Mar 6 '10 at 2:02
  • I thought it was funny. :) – Christian Jun 6 '10 at 10:08

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