I have been using the SQL Server 2008 R2 Express version (10.50.1600) for quite a while now and want to free it of the limitations of the 10gb database size and use of only 1 core.

Therefore I have order SQL Server 2008 Standard with 10 Cal's.

My question is, what is involved in upgrading from the free version to the SQL Server Standard version?

Do I need to remove the free version first and then reinstall SQL Server Standard?

Its an online server in a data centre in the UK (I am in Spain) so obviously cannot insert the dvd/cd into the server or is there an upgrade button I need to be aware of?

  • 3
    The Express edition you've been using is version 2008 R2 (10.50.xxx) so I hope you ordered 2008 R2 Standard, because otherwise, you'll have serious troubles! – marc_s May 27 '14 at 7:50
  • He does not - he can easily upgrade to 2014 standard and if he ordered 2008 r2 standard now he is wasting money on a SERIOUSLY outdated product. – TomTom May 27 '14 at 7:51
  • If you did order the same version (2008 R2), then it's really just a matter of installing the SQL Server 2008 R2 Standard, backing up the databases from the free Express edition and restoring them to the Standard edition, and of course, updating all your connection strings to the new server (and possibly instance) name – marc_s May 27 '14 at 7:51
  • Man, why you waste money and not get (a) a sql serer 2014 and (b) the web edition? If you run websites on that the CAL licenses are not legal for use (you need one for every even anonymour user) and you need SPLA licensing anyway. – TomTom May 27 '14 at 7:54
  • @TomTom "Man, why you waste money and not get (a) a sql server 2014" <--- becasue 2012/2014 is not backwards compatible to 2000. 2008 is backwards compatible to 2000. – Craig Edmonds May 29 '14 at 17:20

I have been using the MSSQL 2008 Free version (10.50.1600)

That one does not exist. I suggest you manage enough concentration to read the product name properly- It is either a pirated copy, or it is the express edition. The build number is irrelevant as it indicates a VERSION and is shared between EDITIONS.

and want to free it of the limitations of the 10gb database size and use of only 1 core.

There is no MS product with this limitation. the 10gb limit indicates a SQL Server express 2008 R2 or higher IIRC (could be 2012) but that is limited to my knowledge to one PROCESSOR, not one core. Also it never was a database limitation - there is an easy way to bypasss it if you store large blobs by moving them out of the file into files (the FILESTREAM storage managed by SQL Server).

My question is, what is involved in upgrading from the free version to the MSSQL Standard version?

It is impossible to update - you can uninstall and reinstall, or install side by side.

SQL Server has for ages supported multiple (named) instances. So you can install the second version side by side.

Its an online server in a data centre in the UK (I am in Spain) so obviously cannot insert the dvd/cd into the server

Really? I do that regularly from europe to my servers in the USA. Modern servers supporte remote DVD drives.... for about 10 years or so that is not exactly super complicatd. THAT SAID: SQL Server never needed the DVD, it always only needed the files, which you can copy.

  • 2
    Also, there is a 10GB limit in the Express editions of 2008 and 2012. Moving BLOBs out (in the unlikely event they're being used) is a way to maximise your usage of the limit, it is not a way to remove the limit. – Alan B May 27 '14 at 7:55
  • But it is not a 10g limit on the DATABASe - it is on the database FILE. THe DATABASE can be larger (as in: containing more data) with the filestream option. – TomTom May 27 '14 at 8:03

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