4

I'm trying to write an automator service to fire up virtualhost.sh in a terminal.

Using the Services context menu the dialog opens to ask for the name of virtual host, then runs an applescript to launch terminal and pass in the input text.

What I want is to pass in my username and password to admin privileges so that I don't need to pass it in the terminal with sudo.

This can be done with do shell script but that executes a bin/sh and the virtualhost.sh is a bash script so I get the error bin/sh: virtualhost.sh command not found

Alternately I can use do script with command but this doesn't allow me to pass in the user name and password.

My code looks like so:

on run {input, parameters}
    set vhost to "virtualhost.sh " & input
    tell application "Terminal"
        activate
        do shell script vhost user name "user" password "pass" with 
                  administrator privileges

    end tell
end run

This produces the bin/sh error previously mentioned.

With do script with command

on run {input, parameters}
    set vhost to "virtualhost.sh " & input
    tell application "Terminal"
        activate
        do script with command vhost user name "user" password "pass" with
                  administrator privileges

    end tell
end run

This produces an escaping error: Expected end of line, etc. but found property.

Is there a way to do this correctly?

  • It sounds like you are trying to make a service. Is there a reason to not use launchd? – phs May 28 '14 at 22:17
6

Not specifically familiar with AppleScript Studio, but you can do it in plain old AppleScript (which appears to have the same issue) if you provide a full path to virtualhost.sh. (Also, Terminal is not required with "do shell script".) Example:

set vhost to "/usr/local/bin/virtualhost.sh " & input
do shell script vhost user name "user" password "pass" ¬
    with administrator privileges

You can also extend $PATH (which is by default /usr/bin:/bin:/usr/sbin:/sbin with "do shell script") to include the path to virtualhost.sh, e.g.:

set vhost to "{ PATH=$PATH:/usr/local/bin; virtualhost.sh " & input & "; }"
do shell script vhost user name "user" password "pass" ¬
    with administrator privileges

If you want a relative path, you can put virtualhost.sh inside the script application or bundle (e.g. in Contents/Resources), either in Terminal or by control-clicking and choosing "Show Package Contents". Then use "path to me":

set vhostPath to "'" & POSIX path of (path to me) & ¬
    "/Contents/Resources/virtualhost.sh" & "'"
set vhost to vhostPath & space & input
do shell script vhost user name "user" password "pass" ¬
    with administrator privileges
  • I set the full path to the script in the vhost variable, and it does work this way, but the .sh script actually asks several questions which get automatically set to their defaults which isn't ideal. So I think I'll just go with do script with command and go ahead and input the password. It seems to be the only way I can use the prompts produced in the .sh script. Thanks for your help :) – Vince Kronlein May 28 '14 at 9:00
  • I wonder ... if I pasted this script into an automator Run Shell Script dialog would it go through the questions? – Vince Kronlein May 28 '14 at 9:02
  • Ok, I see -- you need the interactivity of the Terminal prompt, but want to avoid the user having to enter their password, which is only available via "do shell script". One fair-bit-of-work idea would be to adapt virtualhost.sh to accept arguments as an alternative to prompting, and then do the prompting before "do shell script" using "display dialog", providing all the answers as a series of arguments. However, I took a look at virtualhost.sh, and since many of the prompts comes after it checks things, that might require significant rework.I'm going to see if I can come up with another way. – Ivan X May 28 '14 at 12:49
  • Posted alternate approach which opens Terminal as root user so you can have interactive shell script running with administrator access without requiring password, whether or not this is actually a good idea. – Ivan X May 28 '14 at 22:36
  • 1
    @VinceKronlein Ah well. Thanks for accepting my answer; hopefully it will still be useful to somebody else! – Ivan X Jun 3 '14 at 11:27
0

Per the comment on my other answer, I'm posting a secondary answer more in the spirit of that there's a will, there's a way, but it's a different, more dangerous approach. However, it's the only solution I can think of to this particular requirement (to get the interactivity of Terminal, but without having to prompt for an administrator password while running a script as administrator).

This solution runs Terminal as root, which is what do shell script "command" with administrator privileges does. This is dangerous because you have an open Terminal window with root access, so carefully weigh benefits against potential consequences of, say, opening a new Terminal window and being at the Bash prompt as root.

For this reason, the Terminal instance that is opened is killed upon completion of the script; if the "kill" command is removed, be aware you'll get multiple instances of Terminal, rather than multiple windows within the same instance.

No idea if this works in AppleScript Studio (it works in AppleScript Editor), but I can't think of any reason why it wouldn't.

set input to "some_input"
set vhost to "/usr/local/bin/virtualhost.sh " & input
set kill to ¬
    "terminal_pid=$(</tmp/terminal_pid); rm /tmp/terminal_pid; kill $terminal_pid"

-- launch Terminal as root, and save its process ID in /tmp/terminal_pid
tell application "Finder" to set beforeProcesses to processes
do shell script ¬
    "/Applications/Utilities/Terminal.app/Contents/MacOS/Terminal " & ¬
    "&> /dev/null & echo $! > /tmp/terminal_pid" user name "user" password ¬
    "pass" with administrator privileges

-- wait until the new Terminal is confirmed to be running
tell application "Finder"
    repeat while (processes is equal to beforeProcesses)
        do shell script "sleep 0.5"
    end repeat
end tell

-- Perform script in root Terminal window that we just opened,
-- and kill Terminal when done to prevent open root prompt
-- and multiple processes.
tell application "Terminal"
    activate
    do script vhost & "; " & kill
end tell

-- optional: wait until Terminal is gone before continuing
do shell script "while [[ ( -f /tmp/terminal_pid ) " & ¬
    "&& ( \"$(ps -p $(</tmp/terminal_pid) -o%cpu='')\" ) ]]; do sleep 0.5; done"

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