115

I have a char in c#:

char foo = '2';

Now I want to get the 2 into an int. I find that Convert.ToInt32 returns the actual decimal value of the char and not the number 2. The following will work:

int bar = Convert.ToInt32(new string(foo, 1));

int.parse only works on strings as well.

Is there no native function in C# to go from a char to int without making it a string? I know this is trivial but it just seems odd that there's nothing native to directly make the conversion.

13 Answers 13

113

Interesting answers but the docs say differently:

Use the GetNumericValue methods to convert a Char object that represents a number to a numeric value type. Use Parse and TryParse to convert a character in a string into a Char object. Use ToString to convert a Char object to a String object.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.char.aspx

  • ahh! so there is something native! Odd that it returns a double. I like this answer better. Thanks for pointing it out. – KeithA Apr 28 '09 at 14:35
  • 69
    @KeithA: There's a reason for it to return double: char.GetNumericValue('¼') yields 0.25. The joys of Unicode... ;-) – Heinzi Jun 26 '12 at 10:09
  • This is not an answer that answers the actual question, Char.GetNumericValue('o'), Char.GetNumericValue('w') and any non numerical char will always return -1 - Jeremy Ruten has posted the correct answer – Rusty Nail Jan 26 '17 at 8:20
  • 2
    @RustyNail in the case of the original question - asking specifically where he knows the char represents a number - this is the right answer – mmcrae Feb 16 '18 at 19:45
  • @mmcrae I don't think so - the original question asks for char to int without using string first. – NetMage Mar 25 at 20:31
124

This will convert it to an int:

char foo = '2';
int bar = foo - '0';

This works because each character is internally represented by a number. The characters '0' to '9' are represented by consecutive numbers, so finding the difference between the characters '0' and '2' results in the number 2.

  • 4
    Downvoting because I can only see mechanism, not intent. – Jay Bazuzi Oct 27 '08 at 5:39
  • 4
    It assumes a certain character set. – EricSchaefer Oct 27 '08 at 8:32
  • 4
    No it doesn't, as long as the digits are in order (which compilers require of the charset) it will work, no matter what value they start on. – Jeremy Ruten Oct 27 '08 at 14:29
  • 3
    Nice little tiny hack! – Pavel Bastov Feb 21 '14 at 10:41
  • 5
    @EricSchaefer But that's a safe assumption in C#: char is always UTF-16. – svick May 14 '14 at 15:48
65

Has anyone considered using int.Parse() and int.TryParse() like this

int bar = int.Parse(foo.ToString());

Even better like this

int bar;
if (!int.TryParse(foo.ToString(), out bar))
{
    //Do something to correct the problem
}

It's a lot safer and less error prone

  • 1
    Absolutely the right approach. Choose the first one if you want non-int inputs to throw, the second if you want to do something else. – Jay Bazuzi Oct 27 '08 at 5:41
  • This is a good approach for a generic conversion method. As an aside, its another example of how .NET promotes bloatware. (I mean go on and unit-test TryParse() and ToString() - you can't, not practically). – logout Aug 19 '10 at 11:55
  • 5
    @logout no, it's an example of how an answer on StackOverflow promotes bloatware. This is indeed unnecessarily bloated, and I don't understand why this is considered superior to subtracting '0' from the char. – Roman Starkov Sep 22 '14 at 1:32
26
char c = '1';
int i = (int)(c-'0');

and you can create a static method out of it:

static int ToInt(this char c)
{
    return (int)(c - '0');
}
  • This is what I was looking for. You could maybe explain what you are doing with the minus zero part. – Xonatron May 31 '18 at 1:18
8

Try This

char x = '9'; // '9' = ASCII 57

int b = x - '0'; //That is '9' - '0' = 57 - 48 = 9
  • Your comment says '9', but your code has 9, which won't compile. – svick May 14 '14 at 15:50
7

By default you use UNICODE so I suggest using faulty's method

int bar = int.Parse(foo.ToString());

Even though the numeric values under are the same for digits and basic Latin chars.

3

This converts to an integer and handles unicode

CharUnicodeInfo.GetDecimalDigitValue('2')

You can read more here.

1

The real way is:

int theNameOfYourInt = (int).Char.GetNumericValue(theNameOfYourChar);

"theNameOfYourInt" - the int you want your char to be transformed to.

"theNameOfYourChar" - The Char you want to be used so it will be transformed into an int.

Leave everything else be.

1

Principle:

char foo = '2';
int bar = foo & 15;

The binary of the ASCII charecters 0-9 is:

0   -   0011 0000
1   -   0011 0001
2   -   0011 0010
3   -   0011 0011
4   -   0011 0100
5   -   0011 0101
6   -   0011 0110
7   -   0011 0111
8   -   0011 1000
9   -   0011 1001

and if you take in each one of them the first 4 LSB (using bitwise AND with 8'b00001111 that equals to 15) you get the actual number (0000 = 0,0001=1,0010=2,... )

Usage:

public static int CharToInt(char c)
{
    return 0b0000_1111 & (byte) c;
}
  • 2
    While this code snippet may be the solution, including an explanation really helps to improve the quality of your post. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, and those people might not know the reasons for your code suggestion. – yivi Dec 26 '17 at 9:25
0

Comparison of some of the methods based on the result when the character is not an ASCII digit:

char c = '\n';                              
Debug.Print($"{c & 15}");                   // 10
Debug.Print($"{c ^ 48}");                   // 58
Debug.Print($"{c - 48}");                   // -38
Debug.Print($"{(uint)c - 48}");             // 4294967258
Debug.Print($"{char.GetNumericValue(c)}");  // -1 
0

I'm using Compact Framework 3.5, and not has a "char.Parse" method. I think is not bad to use the Convert class. (See CLR via C#, Jeffrey Richter)

char letterA = Convert.ToChar(65);
Console.WriteLine(letterA);
letterA = 'あ';
ushort valueA = Convert.ToUInt16(letterA);
Console.WriteLine(valueA);
char japaneseA = Convert.ToChar(valueA);
Console.WriteLine(japaneseA);

Works with ASCII char or Unicode char

-4

I've seen many answers but they seem confusing to me. Can't we just simply use Type Casting.

For ex:-

int s;
char i= '2';
s = (int) i;
  • 1
    This would return the ASCII code of the character 2, not the value 2. – cavpollo May 29 '17 at 18:45
  • Then how about using char.GetNumericValue (It returns a double value) and casting it to int. – Learner Sep 6 '17 at 17:10
  • Yup, that's what @Chad Grant's accepted answer proposes – cavpollo Sep 7 '17 at 6:12
-5

This worked for me:

int bar = int.Parse("" + foo);
  • 5
    How is that different from int.Parse(foo.ToString()), except for being less readable? – svick May 14 '14 at 15:51

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